967 posts tagged with Crime.
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Bike Batman

Meet “Bike Batman,” Seattle’s vigilante reuniting stolen bikes with their owners. [more inside]
posted by mbrubeck on Apr 29, 2016 - 4 comments

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife ... nor his ox. (Exodus 20:17)

Cattle rustling in Texas has risen five-fold in the past decade. Driving it? Drought and desperation: "Cattle rustling has returned, but it has also changed; if the essential act has not, its context has. Today’s rustler has no hope of parlaying a few stolen cattle into a business. Rustling is no longer an aspirational crime, but a stopgap, a stay against desperation. A single head of cattle is not the seed of an empire; it’s a payday loan, a child support payment, or cash for pills. Rustling is not, in this sense, an archaic crime at all, but a crime very much of its time and place, adapted to today’s America, in which social classes are established and the frontier, whatever it was once, has collapsed." [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Apr 26, 2016 - 31 comments

“I truly love keeping the wolf from the lambs.”

The retired cops investigating unsolved murders in one of America’s most violent cities. by Christopher Pomorski [The Guardian] A former murder capital of the US, Camden, New Jersey has created its first cold case squad. Can solving old killings help restore an embattled community’s trust in law and order? [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 24, 2016 - 4 comments

“There was big hype over the video, the stream had a good 2.8K views,”

When Rape Is Broadcast Live On The Internet by Rossalyn Warren [Buzzfeed News] Sexual assault, domestic abuse, and attempted murder are among the crimes recently captured on live video services. BuzzFeed News uncovered one apparent incident of a rape aired in real time and asked what it means for the companies that host this content. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 21, 2016 - 91 comments

38.0000,-97.0000

How an internet mapping glitch turned a random Kansas farm into a digital hell: For the last decade, [Joyce] Taylor and her renters have been visited by all kinds of mysterious trouble. They’ve been accused of being identity thieves, spammers, scammers and fraudsters. They’ve gotten visited by FBI agents, federal marshals, IRS collectors, ambulances searching for suicidal veterans, and police officers searching for runaway children. They’ve found people scrounging around in their barn. The renters have been doxxed, their names and addresses posted on the internet by vigilantes. Once, someone left a broken toilet in the driveway as a strange, indefinite threat. All in all, the residents of the Taylor property have been treated like criminals for a decade. And until I called them this week, they had no idea why.
posted by Cash4Lead on Apr 10, 2016 - 143 comments

Kitty Genovese's killer dies

"Winston Moseley, who stalked, raped and killed Kitty Genovese in a prolonged knife attack in New York in 1964 while neighbors failed to act on her desperate cries for help — a nightmarish tableau that came to symbolize urban apathy in America — died on March 28, in prison." (NYT link) [more inside]
posted by John Cohen on Apr 4, 2016 - 16 comments

My cellie is dead. I killed him.

The Deadly Consequences of Solitary With a Cellmate. "The 4'8"-by-10'8" space was originally built for one, but as Menard became increasingly overcrowded and guards sent more people to solitary, the prison bolted in a second bunk. The two men would have to eat, sleep, and defecate inches from one another for nearly 24 hours a day in a space smaller than a parking spot, if a parking spot had walls made of cement and steel on all sides. With a toilet, sink, shelf, and beds, the men were left with a sliver of space about a foot-and-a-half wide to maneuver around each other. If one stood, the other had to sit."
posted by Rumple on Mar 30, 2016 - 57 comments

The Mastermind

"My immediate reaction upon discovering this connection was a sudden and irrational fear: Le Roux was something new, a self-made cartel boss whose origins were not in family connections but in code. Not just any code, but encryption software that would play a role in world events a dozen years after he created it. I stared at the address on the screen, a post-office box in Manila, left now with a still larger mystery: What had turned the earnest, brilliant programmer into an international criminal, with a trail of bodies in his wake?" [more inside]
posted by kaibutsu on Mar 29, 2016 - 69 comments

Shouldn't there be a statute of limitations on all Tom Green movies?

James Myers, Jr. of Concord, NC was arrested on Tuesday after police stopped him for a broken brake light and, upon running his license, were surprised to discover an outstanding arrest warrant for him. From 2002. For failing to return a rented VHS tape (VHS was a video storage format popular in the United States at one time). That tape? Tom Green's 2001 opus, Freddy Got Fingered. (Trailer)
posted by Naberius on Mar 24, 2016 - 99 comments

The Squawker Might Squeal

A Parrot in the Witness Protection Program... and other fascinating tales of some non-humans who have witnessed crimes. A Terry Pratchett joke in real life. (Previously).
posted by LeLiLo on Mar 23, 2016 - 8 comments

...But for you - only five million francs

The Man Who Sold the Eiffel Tower. Twice.
posted by Chrysostom on Mar 10, 2016 - 7 comments

The List

When juveniles are found guilty of sexual misconduct, the sex-offender registry can be a life sentence.--Longform by Sarah Stillman in the New Yorker.
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 7, 2016 - 21 comments

The Crazy Injustice of Denying Exonerated Prisoners Compensation

In California, as well as many other states, even if a prisoner is exonerated of the crime for which they were imprisoned, they are not automatically compensated for prison time. They may have to wait years before receiving payments, if they receive any at all.
posted by Peregrine Pickle on Feb 26, 2016 - 26 comments

Booming Business

Scrapper, directed and produced by Stephan Wassmann, is a film about a group of survivalists, desperadoes, and range runners who risk their lives scavenging scrap metal from exploded and unexploded ordnance from the impact areas of the U.S. Navy and Marines Aerial Gunnery Range in the Chocolate Mountains of southeastern California.
posted by mattdidthat on Feb 17, 2016 - 18 comments

People in prison drawing people who should be

For over a year, we asked people in prison to paint or draw people we felt should be in prison–the CEOs of companies destroying our environment, economy, and society. Here are the results. Click on the images to see the crimes committed by both the companies and the artists.
posted by louche mustachio on Feb 17, 2016 - 20 comments

How in the world can she go to the Super Bowl?

"Demaryius Thomas has just sent his mother a picture of the most unlikely Super Bowl ticket of all, the one intended for her, and now Katina Smith has a few days to decide whether she's prepared to take it."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 7, 2016 - 34 comments

"That’s when the narcotics officers kicked in the door."

The NYPD is Kicking People Out of Their Homes, Even If They Haven’t Committed a Crime via ProPublica and the New York Daily News.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 5, 2016 - 24 comments

The precogs were right

St. Louis turns to predictive policing software: "At a time when communities are crying out for justice," Crockford told me, "I never heard anyone in one of these communities say, ‘I think police need to use more computers!’"
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 3, 2016 - 25 comments

"But for me, this is not entertainment; it’s extremely painful."

Last night FX premiered their true crime adaptation of The People V. O.J. Simpson, based on the Jeffrey Toobin's book The Run of His Life. Marcia Clark, a prosecutor in the case, has given an interview to Vox on, "on What Episode One of The People v. O.J. Simpson Got Right and Wrong". Briefly, Clark covers how the prosecutorial team considered race, liberties the show takes, her perception in the media circus the trial would inspire, the aftermath of the case (including O.J.'s later incarceration), and the meaning of the trial in the present day.
posted by codacorolla on Feb 3, 2016 - 43 comments

The "Guilty Mind" principle eliminates a lot of "crimes"

Everyone commits crimes. There are so many laws out there making what's relatively banal behavior criminal if looked at in that light. Apparently a longstanding legal principle tho has been the idea of a "guilty mind," which has gotten somewhat lost recently. The idea is that if you can't write a law where it's possible for a person to commit a crime without meaning to commit a crime. More in the link.
posted by BradyDale on Jan 30, 2016 - 43 comments

The Trials of Alice Goffman

‘‘Alice used a writing style that today you can’t really use in the social sciences.’’ He sighed and began to trail off. ‘‘In the past,’’ he said with some astonishment, ‘‘they really did write that way.’’ The book smacked, some sociologists argued, of a kind of swaggering adventurism that the discipline had long gotten over. Goffman became a proxy for old and unsettled arguments about ethnography that extended far beyond her own particular case. What is the continuing role of the qualitative in an era devoted to data? When the politics of representation have become so fraught, who gets to write about whom? [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 13, 2016 - 60 comments

'...follow the law or you’re no better than the crook.'

Inside the Snitch Tank. After his arrest for the worst mass shooting in Orange County, CA history, Scott Dekraai poured out his feelings to a jailhouse informant. But instead of nailing down a death-penalty conviction against a confessed killer who was arrested with murder weapons in his car, the bugging of Dekraai’s cell touched off a legal storm over prosecutorial misconduct and the misuse of jailhouse informants which has delayed justice and drawn national attention. The Orange County Register has set up an extensive website to accompany their ongoing investigation and report.
posted by zarq on Jan 13, 2016 - 17 comments

Cheese robbery in the Netherlands

DutchNews reports on how Dutch cheese farms have recently been plagued by cheese theft. It may sound a little bit like the plot for a children's book, but it's quite serious: thousands of euros worth of cheese are being stolen from the dairy farms. [more inside]
posted by Too-Ticky on Jan 11, 2016 - 85 comments

The Long Fall of Phoebe Jonchuck

"He was a schemer who used the courts for profit and revenge. He was a paranoid, angry meth addict who had been arrested for battery and domestic violence seven times. He had been involuntarily committed, by his family’s count. And yet, in its report on Phoebe’s death, the Florida Department of Children and Families concluded, “There was nothing in the preceding several years that could have reasonably been interpreted as predictive of such an event.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 8, 2016 - 13 comments

344

Baltimore's City Paper came out today with a list of all 344 people murdered in the Baltimore City this year with a small description of each incident. "The editorial staff at City Paper looked to the Vietnam Memorial for inspiration this week for the following reasons: Because almost every day the police department announces the latest homicide, because every week the paper runs the death tally in Murder Ink, because there were more homicides this year than in the previous 22, because the numbers keep rising, because each single homicide is the story of a life with a ripple effect on a family and neighborhood, because we wish we could do a proper obituary for each person killed but lack the editorial resources, because we wish to acknowledge each death, because we are hopeful that cumulative murders and the visual impact of sheer numbers and names will move readers to action, because we have faith in this city and its ability to do so much better than it does, because we hope people will be shocked out of their complacency, because something has to change, we have dedicated this entire issue to a list of the 344 murders in Baltimore this year. There will be no arts coverage, no columns, no photos. We are in mourning."
posted by josher71 on Jan 6, 2016 - 39 comments

215 Of The Best Longreads Of 2015

215 Of The Best Longreads Of 2015 [more inside]
posted by triggerfinger on Jan 1, 2016 - 19 comments

Much of what we do in the law is guesswork

12 reasons to worry about our criminal justice system, by 9th Circuit Judge Alex Kozinski [PDF]
posted by T.D. Strange on Jan 1, 2016 - 16 comments

A scam like this is going to take years to investigate

Rather than a simple scam, Vyapam appears to be a vast societal swindle—one that reveals the hollowness at the heart of practically every Indian state institution: inadequate schools, a crushing shortage of meaningful jobs, a corrupt government, a cynical middle class happy to cheat the system to aid their own children, a compromised and inept police force and a judiciary incapable of enforcing its laws.
Aman Sethi writes in the Guardian on the so-called Vyapam scam—allegations of high-level and systematic corruption in the administration of the state professional examinations that determine entry into medical schools, state colleges, and entry-level civil service jobs within the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. The scandal has been connected with 48 suspicious deaths involving people implicated in or investigating the scandal. The Indian Express has a timeline of events, while the Times of India has an extensive archive of further coverage.
posted by Sonny Jim on Dec 18, 2015 - 15 comments

"Here is a fascinating game of wits for a party of any size."

Minute Mysteries (1932) by H. A. Ripley is a recent addition to Project Gutenberg: "In these accounts every fact, every clue necessary to the solution is given ... Each problem has only one possible solution. Written in less than two hundred and sixty words, these little stories can be read in a minute. Here is your chance to work on an absolute equality with the Professor; to match your wits with his and the criminal's. You know as much as the Professor does. Now you have an opportunity of proving just how good a detective you are and what poor detectives your friends are." [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Dec 16, 2015 - 30 comments

"An Unbelievable Story of Rape"

An incredible story by ProPublica and The Marshall Project. What happens when police believe rape victims? What happens when they don't?
posted by trillian on Dec 16, 2015 - 42 comments

"Well ya know, for me, the action is the juice."

A guy told me one time, "Don't let yourself get attached to anything you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you feel the heat around the corner."
Michael Mann's Heat was released 20 years ago today. [more inside]
posted by kirkaracha on Dec 15, 2015 - 61 comments

Emilio no longer looks me in the eye, but Molly has become vicious.

Jury Duty, by Anonymous. (SL Medium): There is one other person in the room who doesn’t quite fit in, the Latino man who is the only other male juror of color. He sits and stares out the window. He doesn’t join in on small talk. “I haven’t been sleeping,” he says, when asked why he is so silent. “A man’s life is at stake.” I think of him as Henry Fonda in 12 Angry Men. We will share this role.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 4, 2015 - 140 comments

The Boy They Couldn't Kill

"The Boy They Couldn't Kill: How Rae Carruth's son survived and thrives" by Thomas Lake.
posted by goatdog on Nov 18, 2015 - 10 comments

The more things change . . .

After more than a decade of decline, Baltimore's homicide rate spikes up. Tonight it just broke the 300 mark. [more inside]
posted by CommonSense on Nov 14, 2015 - 17 comments

Bust: An Insider's Account of Greenville's Underground Poker Scene

Twelve years ago, an amateur poker player from Tennessee won the main event at the World Series of Poker, and suddenly, the entire world wanted to play Texas Hold ’em. The craze spawned countless underground poker rooms. Greenville, S.C., was one of the South’s hottest underground poker towns — until the whole thing went sideways in a hail of gunfire. This week, as the 2015 WSOP draws to a close, The Bitter Southerner will tell you a week-long story about that night in Greenville — and the South’s twisted relationship with legal poker. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Nov 13, 2015 - 16 comments

"We were to become paymasters for the CIA around the world."

The mysterious collapse of Australia's Nugan Hand bank (SLYT) has long been a favorite subject of the espionage mythos, with its chairman's suicide, the disappearance of its former CIA co-founder Michael Hand, the bank's ties to the CIA, apparent drug money laundering... basically, talk of ties to every CIA conspiracy theory of the last 30 years... the stuff of legends. Except, of course, that Michael Hand has been found by Australia's 60 Minutes, living in Idaho Falls, where he runs a business manufacturing combat knives for the special OPs crowd. Here is the full 60 Minutes report.
posted by markkraft on Nov 8, 2015 - 20 comments

Murder in the Alps

Four dead, an ever-expanding list of suspects, dozens of detectives on the case. Three years after the fact, a mysterious shooting in the French Alps has evolved into one of the most confounding, globe-spanning criminal investigations in decades.
posted by Chrysostom on Oct 14, 2015 - 59 comments

A Criminal Mind

For 40 years, Joel Dreyer was a respected psychiatrist who oversaw a clinic for troubled children, belonged to an exclusive country club, and doted on his four daughters and nine grandchildren. Then, suddenly, he became a major drug dealer. Why?
posted by ellieBOA on Oct 7, 2015 - 15 comments

The Columbine effect

Mother Jones: How the Media Inspires Mass Shooters, and what it can do to prevent copycat attacks
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 6, 2015 - 125 comments

Unlockdown Nation

Why are little kids in Japan so independent? - 'If we had a nonviolent society, kids could walk around on their own, unafraid, like they do in Japan'. (via)
posted by kliuless on Oct 3, 2015 - 83 comments

Horror and chill

For the first time in forever, Halloween will be filled with scary movies.* And while you're here... [more inside]
posted by triggerfinger on Sep 29, 2015 - 89 comments

The Rise of Rape Culture

We demand that women live in fear and behave impeccably to avoid 'asking for it.' "In an extract from her book, Asking for It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture — and What We Can Do About It, author Kate Harding explains how women order their lives around the fear of rape – and of being blamed for not preventing it." [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Sep 26, 2015 - 61 comments

Why Do We Admire Mobsters?

We don’t glamorize all violent crime; no one holds the Son of Sam or Charles Manson in high regard. (It’s hard to imagine their descendants gathering for a celebratory dinner at a steakhouse.) So why are Al Capone, Lansky, Arnold Rothstein, Luciano, and their ilk held up as mythic figures, even heroes of a sort, not just by their families but by the general public? Why are members of the Italian mafia treated more like celebrities than unsavory criminals?
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 21, 2015 - 95 comments

The Whole Run of Crime

The Best American Crime Writing Series (renamed The Best American Crime Reporting in 2006) ran from 2002 to 2010 and presented the finest in true crime journalism. Many of the stories are available from the online magazines in which they were first printed or from other legitimate sources. Links to all 105 available stories appear below the fold. I have previously presented links to the stories from the 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 editions. Some of those links have gone bad, so they have been reworked. [more inside]
posted by dances_with_sneetches on Sep 17, 2015 - 25 comments

The Heart Of Football Beats In Aliquippa

Over five decades of economic decline and racial conflict, a Western Pennsylvania mill town has found unity and hope on the football field. "There is no drug dealing at the Pit, and rarely any violence," Walker says. "It really is sacred ground; it's like a miracle. You've got guys that, any other time of the day, they're going to try and rip each other's throats out, but they just walk past each other in the Pit. They're there to watch those kids play."
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 1, 2015 - 5 comments

“I know you’re going to solve it. You always do.”

Relentless: Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills chases a killer
In Putnam County, everybody knows Howard Sills, and Howard Sills knows everybody—except who brutally murdered an elderly couple on Lake Oconee last May. After four decades of always getting his man, has the sheriff met his match?
posted by andoatnp on Aug 25, 2015 - 23 comments

‘‘excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed."

The Bail Trap
Every year, thousands of innocent people are sent to jail only because they can’t afford to post bail, putting them at risk of losing their jobs, custody of their children — even their lives.

Previously: Memorize a landline number RIGHT NOW
posted by andoatnp on Aug 22, 2015 - 26 comments

The End of the Sixties

You Must Remember This: Charles Manson's Hollywood - Karina Longworth's podcast on the hidden history of Hollywood (previously, previously) takes an an in depth look at the darker side of the 60s. [more inside]
posted by Artw on Aug 12, 2015 - 53 comments

"I am not going to be your attorney"

When Eric Wyatt told his public defender that he was mistakenly being thrown back into jail after already serving his time, his public defender cut him off with those eight words. He would spend over three months incarcerated before another public defender urged him to take a plea deal to serve 10 years in prison for a crime he already served time for. It would be another week, 110 days in total, before Wyatt would be set free. [more inside]
posted by Ouverture on Aug 7, 2015 - 36 comments

What? And Give Up Show Business?

(Or I CAN Get Arrested in This Town!) Aspiring actor Jason Stange nailed the audition for the role of an evil doctor in the forthcoming horror film Marla Mae. The low budget production was shot in Olympia Washington, where the local paper took an interest. [more inside]
posted by Naberius on Jul 29, 2015 - 18 comments

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