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Humanity needs bots to save the world's knowledge from humanity.

Wikipedia is edited by bots. That's a good thing.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Mar 23, 2014 - 33 comments

 

¶¶˄↗][#

A Conversation With My Copyeditor
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 28, 2014 - 37 comments

Even less talking about Fight Club

VFX artist Richard Trammell presents: Fight Club minus Tyler Durden [via] [more inside]
posted by figurant on Jan 21, 2014 - 25 comments

"Whoa! That was crazy!"

Through the power of clever editing, forced perspective and some other subtle tricks, Zack King has a "magic" Vine compilation that is excellently entertaining. [slyt]
posted by quin on Jan 16, 2014 - 21 comments

Will Graham's No Good Very Bad Day

Crackvids are the genre of fandom videos playing out of context or absurd audio over clips of thier favorite media but rarely do they meet the heights of this video for NBC's super serious high-Gothic drama about serial killers, Hannibal. (SLYTP, NSFW audio, SPOILERS, general fandom silliness)
posted by The Whelk on Oct 16, 2013 - 225 comments

Tyrant, mass-murderer ... editor.

Stalin's Blue Pencil (via).
Djugashvili (later Stalin) was a ruthless person, and a serious editor. The Soviet historian Mikhail Gefter has written about coming across a manuscript on the German statesman Otto von Bismarck edited by Stalin's own hand. The marked-up copy dated from 1940, when the Soviet Union was allied with Nazi Germany. Knowing that Stalin had been responsible for so much death and suffering, Gefter searched "for traces of those horrible things in the book." He found none. What he saw instead was "reasonable editing, pointing to quite a good taste and an understanding of history."
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 15, 2013 - 21 comments

Who Edited Shakespeare?

New technology has changed scholarship. Whereas previous generations of experts have sought to reconcile the differences between quarto and Folio, current thinking highlights the difficult relationship between the various incarnations of Shakespeare's texts, something made easier by the availability of rare Shakespeare quartos in digital databases such as Early English Books Online. The scholar Eleanor Prosser thus detects "considerable evidence" for the elimination of metrical and stylistic "irregularities" in the Folio: short lines are lengthened to 10 syllables, verbs agreed with subjects, double negatives resolved. In addition, a range of unusual words are added to the text, words not used elsewhere by Shakespeare. Prosser concludes: "somewhere behind the Folio … lies a conscientious and exacting editor with literary pretensions", albeit one "more experienced in the transcription of literary than of theatrical works". But who was it?
Who edited Shakespeare? by Saul Frampton. [more inside]
posted by Kattullus on Jul 13, 2013 - 36 comments

Jacques Barzun, Grandfather, Advisor, Editor, Scholar

Two lengthy appreciations of Jacques Barzun's influence: Barzun's grandson remembers the letters of his well-known grandfather, and Helen Hazen reminisces about Barzun's unexpected effort to help her write her first book.
posted by cgc373 on May 15, 2013 - 2 comments

Scott Kelby on composition

Photoshop guru/author Scott Kelby speaks about composition and editing (65 mins). [more inside]
posted by starman on Mar 7, 2013 - 12 comments

Point of View, Depth of Focus

Scott Eric Kaufman examines the visual rhetoric of Game of Thrones, Doctor Who, Mad Men, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, and more.
posted by Iridic on Nov 29, 2012 - 15 comments

Creative Director Starts Drinking Heavily

How Does An Idea Become A Book? (flowchart)
posted by The Whelk on Sep 29, 2012 - 25 comments

Even with the best contract in the world, if the people on the other side of the agreement are crooks or jerks, you’re going to have a difficult time.

When publishing goes wrong. Mandy DeGeit was a first time author submitting to a horror anthology by Undead Press. The contract included a line that they had the right to edit the story -- standard operating procedure. But when she got a copy of the book, they'd drastically changed the story: "They turned a non-gendered character into a boy, they named the best friend, they created a memory for the main character about animal abuse. They added a suggestion of rape at the end…" [more inside]
posted by Rev. Syung Myung Me on Sep 3, 2012 - 45 comments

My Money's on Nolan

Christopher Nolan (mentioned previously) has been a divisive maker of movies. Some have lauded him as "the only working auteur" while others, like David Cronenberg ,and those that agree with him, tend to think he is a mere maker of entertaining genre flicks. Film scholar, David Bordwell, explains why both arguments have merit.
posted by sendai sleep master on Aug 21, 2012 - 74 comments

We're watching your comments for correct comma usage.

"Who knew people were so interested in commas?" Ben Yagoda has written three NYT pieces on correct comma usage: Fanfare for the Comma Man, The Most Comma Mistakes, and Some Comma Questions.
posted by hypotheticole on May 26, 2012 - 62 comments

"What did they talk about all those days?"

"The 'Undue Weight' of Truth on Wikipedia" - When historian Timothy Messer-Kruse attempted to edit the Wikipedia article on the Haymarket Affair he ran up against the project's policies and editors. Besides the coverage by Messer-Kruse about his two years trying to edit the article in The Chronicle, linked above, the story has spilled out into other media outlets. An article in The Atlantic, an NPR segment with Messer-Kruse and Andrew Lih, a Reddit thread, Bigthink, and others have chimed in on the situation. Lengthy discussion, and a "good article reassessment", has resulted on Wikipedia.
posted by IvoShandor on Mar 3, 2012 - 92 comments

"Give Back and Learn"

"Fast Company’s four-hour interview with [Martin Scorsese] for their December-January cover story: How to Lead A Creative Life, was ostensibly about his career, and how he had been able to stay so creative through years of battling studios. But the Hugo director punctuated everything he said with references to movies: 85 of them, in fact." Welcome to Martin Scorsese’s Film School: The 85 Films You Need To See To Know Anything About Film [more inside]
posted by zarq on Feb 26, 2012 - 37 comments

"I really love to discover other people."

Zapatou is a video editor who likes to make audio-visual mashups, such as World Covers of Adele's Rolling in the Deep, a a 10th anniversary 9/11 memorial in pictures, quad-screen HD eye-candy of the Fast and the Furious, and Mellencamp's Hurt So Good, lip-synched by the Ice Age 3 crew.
posted by iamkimiam on Jan 22, 2012 - 11 comments

The Unkindest Cut of All

Why the video pros are moving away from Apple
posted by Artw on Jan 15, 2012 - 111 comments

Raiders of the Lost Archives

Shot-by-shot comparison of "Raiders of the Lost Ark" vs. scenes from 30 different adventure films made between 1919-1973
posted by Artw on Dec 31, 2011 - 62 comments

"Scenes reflect what has not yet happened, scenes anticipate what has already happened."

In the Cut: Piecing Together the Action Sequence. A video essay in three parts by Jim Emerson.
posted by villanelles at dawn on Dec 6, 2011 - 46 comments

The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth

After his presidency, Thomas Jefferson took on the task of re-editing the New Testament by literally cutting and pasting a new version of the text, shorn of Jesus's miracles and the Resurrection. Titled The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth (but known more commonly today as the Jefferson Bible), the handmade book had begun to crumble after nearly two centuries. Now, after a painstaking conservation process, the Jefferson Bible has been digitized, and will be on exhibition at the Smithsonian though May 2012. (Previously)
posted by Horace Rumpole on Dec 6, 2011 - 64 comments

You’ve probably read all the stories you ever want to about killer sows from outer space, but mine is a little different …

The Sobering Saga of Myrtle the Manuscript. A cautionary tale.
posted by Think_Long on Oct 19, 2011 - 10 comments

Drums, bass, guitar, synth...

Alt-rockers MUTEMATH's new song lets you futz around with its individual tracks. Cool bonus: it alters both the audio track and an accompanying video of the part being played. Takes some time to load, but it's worth it to unleash your inner producer.
posted by Askiba on Jul 23, 2011 - 7 comments

"I used it for ten minutes and it's the worst interface ever."

Final Cut Pro backlash. Two months ago, Apple previewed the new 64-bit version of its popular professional video editing application, completely re-written and re-designed with loads of new, revolutionary features, an iMovie-like interface, and a deep price cut. Excitement and anticipation abounded. On Tuesday, it was released, and the excitement has been completely reversed. Unfortunately, as Apple typically does with all-new products, they left out a lot of features that users particularly needed (including backwards compatibility), and simultaneously killed the previous version, causing an unprecedented amount of confusion and anger in a matter of hours. Many people felt left in the lurch, others felt that Apple had abandoned the pro market without telling anyone, and still others prescribed patience.
posted by fungible on Jun 23, 2011 - 193 comments

Restoring Orson Welles' "Touch of Evil"

As time has gone by, though, Touch of Evil has acquired a large cult following, and it now regularly appears on lists of the best films of the century. What is not generally known is that the film never accurately reflected Welles's intentions for it. In July 1957, the studio took over the editing of the film and prevented him from participating in its completion. In an odd turn of events, however, a 58-page memo that Welles wrote in 1957 was recently rediscovered, and a small team on which I was film editor and sound mixer has used that remarkable document to bring Touch of Evil as close as possible to Welles's original concept. - Walter Murch, 1998
posted by Trurl on Jun 14, 2011 - 37 comments

monkey like jump cuts

If you believe the hype, this is a surfer video edited by a monkey.
posted by crunchland on Mar 29, 2011 - 28 comments

"Until you run out of breath."

Have you heard about face yoga? [odd SLYT]
posted by defenestration on Feb 13, 2011 - 35 comments

Put Your Camera to Work

Vimeo Video School is a fun place for anyone to learn how to make better videos. Start by browsing the Vimeo Lessons, or find specific video tutorials created by other members.
posted by netbros on Dec 20, 2010 - 4 comments

Do you see what happens when you fight a stranger in the alps?

Dubbing over dialoge is a necessary evil for any network that wants to play a movie within their standards and practices. But it can often turn a crass, but cogent line into something outright bizarre. The Big Lebowski. Snakes on a Plane. Pulp Fiction. Die Hard 2.
posted by mccarty.tim on Nov 15, 2010 - 59 comments

Writing and editing

"I've discovered some wonderful books but am frustrated by the standard of editing." [more inside]
posted by philipy on Oct 29, 2010 - 43 comments

Are You Sure? The Video Footage Says Otherwise.

Software, and Instant Real-Time 1-Click Commissar Removal: In the old days, photographic purges were laborious and time-consuming. Modern software has of course made this process much faster, and now this important task can be applied to video, and in real-time. Of course, if you don't want to actually remove someone or something, but instead simply want to turn ordinary men into Heroes of the Revolution and vixens into forgettable faces in the crowd, well, that too is an option.
posted by darth_tedious on Oct 12, 2010 - 18 comments

Original manuscript of AA's "Big Book" to be made public

For millions of addicts around the world, Alcoholics Anonymous's basic text - informally known as the Big Book - is the Bible. And as they're about to find out, the Bible was edited. After being hidden away for nearly 70 years and then auctioned twice, the original manuscript by AA co-founder Bill Wilson is about to become public for the first time next week, complete with edits by Wilson-picked commenters that reveal a profound debate in 1939 about how overtly to talk about God.
posted by Joe Beese on Sep 22, 2010 - 76 comments

Beep Do Doot Repeat

The Creator's Project unleashes The Eclectic Method’s (previously) latest video, Super Mario Mashup onto the world with a bonus genre-exploding montage and Q&A trying to put it all together.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 31, 2010 - 8 comments

"Tweet?" Delete.

Standards editor Philip Corbett at the New York Times (allegedly) issues memo officially discouraging use of the word "tweet." [more inside]
posted by hat on Jun 12, 2010 - 106 comments

Dede Allen, 1923-2010

Dede Allen, editor of such films as Bonnie and Clyde, Dog Day Afternoon and Night Moves has died at the age of 86.
posted by brundlefly on Apr 19, 2010 - 22 comments

The Chyron's Kuleshov

Culture, Relativism, and Bank Ads
posted by jtron on Mar 16, 2010 - 33 comments

Open Movie Educator

Raffaella Traniello (Vimeo profile) is an educator and multimedia enthusiast who describes herself as "Animation lover. Linux user. Hungry for clever beauty." She's also committed to bringing free/open source software to the classroom. Her efforts are remarkable in that she achieves pleasant results with community-developed software and involves school children in the production process. Since many users of Linux video editing software -- especially the Cinelerra software package -- are quickly turned off by its opaque interface, Raffaella has also created Cinelerra for Grandma, in which she covers everything from the basics to more difficult subjects like animation.
posted by circular on Mar 10, 2010 - 26 comments

I Got This Frakkin' Thorn In My Side

Galactica: Sabotage is a shot-by-shot remake of the Beastie Boys' Sabotage video, using footage from Battlestar Galactica. Here's a side-by-side comparison.
posted by mattdidthat on Mar 9, 2010 - 42 comments

Two For the Road

"Two for the road is an online editing experiment based on the aesthetic and composition of two photographs co-existing in the same space."
posted by chunking express on Jan 12, 2010 - 23 comments

"I am a former child,'' she said, ''and I haven't forgotten a thing.''

Ursula Nordstrom—the "Maxwell Perkins of the Tot Department"—was, from 1940 to 1973, head of the Department of Books for Boys and Girls at the New York publisher Harper & Row, and until 1979 had her own imprint there, Ursula Nordstrom Books. A legendary editor known to her authors as UN, she published the books of Laura Ingalls Wilder, Margaret Wise Brown, Shel Silverstein, Maurice Sendak (whom she is credited with discovering) and, to not a little controversy, E. B. White (previously). One of "the last generation of devoted letter writers," she wrote nearly 100,000 during her five decade career at Harper, of which 300 of the most amusing, acerbic, and illuminating are collected in Dear Genius by Leonard S. Marcus, the first hundred pages of which can be read at the Harper website. [more inside]
posted by ocherdraco on Jan 6, 2010 - 8 comments

Tips 'n' cuts

Digitalfilms, a blog by video/film editor Oliver Peters, serves primarily as a repository for his product reviews pertaining to nonlinear editing systems - including, but not limited to, Avid Media Composer and Apple Final Cut Pro... [more inside]
posted by Neilopolis on Dec 2, 2009 - 27 comments

Slow lede - get to the news faster

When the Toronto Star announced that they were outsourcing in-house editing jobs, the union wasn't too happy. Neither was this disgruntled editor.
posted by Saxon Kane on Nov 10, 2009 - 81 comments

Is this your homework, Larry?

The research, literary, and copy editors of Vanity Fair go to town on Sarah Palin's resignation speech.
seeing as nearly everyone I talked to at the 10th meetup was an editor of some kind, you'll all get a kick out of this
posted by Jon_Evil on Jul 20, 2009 - 79 comments

Paul Graham Writes An Essay

Paul Graham recently wrote an essay. And saved all his edits, so you can replay it in entirety just as he wrote it.* It's quite fascinating to see if you ever wondered how he (or other writers) went about their job. And here's the Hacker News thread he initiated. This can be a very useful tool to watch and understand your own writing process, or understand and help your students write. Like cvs/svn mirror for long form writing. [more inside]
posted by forwebsites on Feb 26, 2009 - 54 comments

Buying a scalpel set doesn't make you a surgeon, but...

Not all of us need, or want, $10,000 worth of Adobe and Microsoft software to be creative. So, here's some alternatives, each available on every major platform:

GIMP, for all your drawing and photo-editing needs. (Windows and OSX.)
Inkscape, for vector graphics creation.
Scribus, for incredibly powerful document creation.
FontForge, if you want to make your own fonts.
OpenOffice, the old standby for word processing, spreadsheets, and all those other office needs. [more inside]
posted by cthuljew on Feb 20, 2009 - 189 comments

Break it down, Martin! Yo, I'm tr-tr-tr-tr-tr-tr-tr-try-try-try-try-tryin' to.

Cinemnesis, filmmaker Martin Arnold's 41 minute compilation of the films of his "compulsive repetition" trilogy, is available to you online. The quality is lacking, small details are missed, but I thought you'd enjoy these nonetheless. Time codes for the three pieces and more inside. [more inside]
posted by Ambrosia Voyeur on Dec 4, 2008 - 6 comments

Profile of a Profile

Storyboard is an almost-real-time, behind-the-scenes look at the assigning, writing, editing, and designing of a Wired feature. The Birth of Storyboard is a (minimally edited) video of the conversation that spawned the project. The feature—that will be published in November—is about screenwriter Charlie Kaufman. In the past he has woven the process of creating his work into the work itself, so Wired writer Jason Tanz thought it would make sense to do the same. Looking to promote his directorial debut, Kaufman has agreed to take part in the project.
posted by defenestration on Sep 3, 2008 - 6 comments

Let's Step Outside

Who ruined the Hollywood fight scene? With average shot length under six seconds and falling, are fight scenes more exciting than they used to be? Or is Hollywood's love of fast editing cutting us short? [more inside]
posted by The Card Cheat on Jul 29, 2008 - 111 comments

What I Really Want Is To Direct

The films of Joel and Ethan Coen. The films of Tim Burton. The films of Stanley Kubrick.
posted by optovox on Jun 17, 2008 - 63 comments

Get Your Red Pens Ready.

Zip up that dangling modifier--it's National Grammar Day! Let the ranting begin...
posted by laconic titan on Mar 4, 2008 - 37 comments

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