1249 posts tagged with Education.
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“It’s time to rethink this system.”

The 50 Most Segregating School Borders In America [NPR.org] “The grass is greener ... if you're a student in Detroit, looking across your school district's boundary with the neighboring Grosse Pointe public schools. Nearly half of Detroit's students live in poverty; that means a family of four lives on roughly $24,000 a year — or less. In Grosse Pointe, a narrow stretch of real estate nestled between Detroit and Lake St. Clair, just 7 percent of students live at or below the poverty line. To recap, that's 49 percent vs. 7 percent. Neighbors. Which is why a new report from the nonprofit EdBuild [Fault Lines] [.pdf] ranks the Detroit-Grosse Pointe boundary as "the most segregating school district border in the country."”
posted by Fizz on Aug 24, 2016 - 54 comments

You are worth having coffee with.

Francis Su is a professor of mathematics at Harvey Mudd College and the first non-white president of the Mathematical Association of America. In 2013, he presented his Haimo Teaching Award lecture, The Lesson of Grace in Teaching. For Su, when we learn the lesson of grace—that we have dignity irrespective of accomplishments—and when we impart that lesson to our students, we make good teaching, enthusiastic learning, and honest evaluation possible. [more inside]
posted by J.K. Seazer on Aug 16, 2016 - 20 comments

The Flying University of Poland

Marie Curie Got Her Start At a Secret University For Women
posted by Michele in California on Aug 9, 2016 - 4 comments

James Barry, pioneering nineteenth century army surgeon, had a secret

"Sophia Bishop was laying out the body of Dr James Barry, on July 25, 1865, when she screamed. Her master was a woman." [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Aug 4, 2016 - 29 comments

So, the unknowable kicks in

Logic hacking - "Writing shorter and shorter computer programs for which it's unknowable whether these programs run forever, or stop... the winner of the Busy Beaver Game for N-state Turing machines becomes unknowable using ordinary math - somewhere between N = 5 and N = 1919." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jul 30, 2016 - 17 comments

Remember it's your life. Live it any way you like.

First Lady Michelle Obama joins James Corden for a drive around the White House grounds. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 21, 2016 - 56 comments

There's a bear in there

And a chair as well! There's people with games and stories to tell. It's Play School. The much loved Australian children's television program celebrates 50 years on the air. [more inside]
posted by adept256 on Jul 11, 2016 - 15 comments

Legal Troubles

As the rich get richer, trouble continues to brew for law schools in the United States. [more inside]
posted by jedicus on Jun 28, 2016 - 66 comments

Orthodox Jews organize against their former high schools

Young Advocates For Fair Education, or YAFFED, is an NYC-based advocacy group of Orthodox Jewish youth and young adults who complain that their limited high school educations left them ill-equipped to support themselves as adults, and demand that the New York City and New York State education departments enforce laws on minimum school standards. Recently the ED of YAFFED co-wrote an op-ed, Why Do Jewish Leaders Keep Ignoring Ultra-Orthodox Education Crisis?
posted by showbiz_liz on Jun 22, 2016 - 22 comments

Choosing a School for My Daughter in a Segregated City

Choosing a School for My Daughter in a Segregated City: The New York City public-school system is 41 percent Latino, 27 percent black and 16 percent Asian. Three-quarters of all students are low-income. In 2014, the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles, released a report showing that New York City public schools are among the most segregated in the country. Black and Latino children here have become increasingly isolated, with 85 percent of black students and 75 percent of Latino students attending “intensely” segregated schools — schools that are less than 10 percent white. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 16, 2016 - 25 comments

‘Chemophobia’ is irrational, harmful – and hard to break

"We all feel a profound connection with the natural world. E O Wilson called this sensation biophilia: ‘the urge to affiliate with other forms of life’. That sense of connection brings great emotional satisfaction. It can decrease levels of anger, anxiety and pain. It has undoubtedly helped our species to survive, since we are fundamentally dependent on our surrounding environment and ecosystem. But lately biophilia has spawned an extreme variant: chemophobia, a reflexive rejection of modern synthetic chemicals."
It has become conventional wisdom among chemists that “chemophobia” is the root of many people’s trepidation about chemicals. Framing the issue as an irrational fear may not be the best way to improve chemicals’ public image, however.
[more inside] posted by Blasdelb on Jun 13, 2016 - 122 comments

Graduate for Jolley

Last fall, Baltimore's Renaissance Academy High School was put on the school district's closure list for poor student performance, though the decision was later reversed. In November, 17 year old senior Ananias Jolley was stabbed in the middle of science class, and died a few days before Christmas. By the end of February, two more students from the school were killed. 65 students graduated this past Friday from Renaissance; among them Ananias' brother, 20-year-old Santonio Jolley, a dropout who enrolled in Renaissance five days after his brother died. This is Renaissance.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 5, 2016 - 7 comments

Anyone would do it.

Chinese students gaming entry into and passage through Western universities The advertisements were tailored for Chinese college students far from home, struggling with the English language and an unfamiliar culture. Coaching services peppered the students with emails and chat messages in Chinese, offering to help foreign students at U.S. colleges do much of the work necessary for a university degree. The companies would author essays for clients. Handle their homework. Even take their exams. All for about a $1,000 a course.
posted by modernnomad on May 30, 2016 - 48 comments

Posh: a vision of Britain that sells

Britain has changed so quickly, the gains of 40 years of social progress undone in half a generation, that most of us are still struggling to compute it, but the evidence is right there in front of us, on our cinema and television screens. It’s not posh-bashing to say this is a problem.
Why Working-class Actors Are a Dying Breed, The Observer (8 May 2016).
posted by Sonny Jim on May 8, 2016 - 35 comments

Contact! Let's make contact!

"'Too many children think that scientists are all middle-aged white males in laboratory coats,' Edward Atkins, 3-2-1 Contact's director of content, told The New York Times in 1983." The Kids' Show That Taught Me to Ask "Why?", an ode to 3-2-1 Contact. [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets on May 3, 2016 - 41 comments

Neurodiversity on display

With his project Special Books by Special Kids, special education teacher Christopher Ulmer interviews neurodiverse people about their lives and interests. [more inside]
posted by R a c h e l on Apr 30, 2016 - 2 comments

"Most of them hit ninth grade thinking, 'It's not for me.'"

"Students who are new to America or lack college-educated parents often don't know how important college is. They don't know their options. They don't know that the sticker price isn't necessarily their price. They don't know how to choose schools and apply for college and financial aid. They also lack the support structure that can keep them on track." Guiding a First Generation to College [NYT] [more inside]
posted by amnesia and magnets on Apr 26, 2016 - 25 comments

Interactive timeline of history

Chronas is a history project linking Wikipedia and Wikidata that lets you use a time slider at the bottom to see how the world looked any given date during the past 2000 years, watching realms grow and disappear. Video describing how it works. If you click on the countries/regions/empires shown, then it will show you the appropriate Wikipedia entry. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Apr 20, 2016 - 24 comments

Playing with Blocks

In the late ’70s and ’80s, the arrival of personal computers like the Commodore 64 gave rise to the first generation of kids fluent in computation. They learned to program in Basic, to write software that they swapped excitedly with their peers. It was a playful renaissance that eerily parallels the embrace of Minecraft by today’s youth - Inside the Minecraft Generation.
posted by Artw on Apr 17, 2016 - 30 comments

Seattle School's Segregation

How Seattle Gave Up on Busing and Allowed Its Public Schools to Become Alarmingly Resegregated. Seattle reluctantly bused students to integrate schools in the 1970's. They bus no longer—unfortunately, as integration benefited the students who did it.
posted by Margalo Epps on Apr 17, 2016 - 56 comments

Now that applications for Teach for America are down....

TFA chief executive is taking a fresh look at how to turn things around. Applications are down 35% over 3 years. The executive team is taking a "fresh look" at how to make things work, with the goal of doing things differently. [more inside]
posted by Salamandrous on Apr 13, 2016 - 27 comments

"I’m glad people have stopped asking whether the schools are better"

Pearson’s Quest to Cover the Planet in Company-Run Schools
posted by cosmic.osmo on Apr 12, 2016 - 28 comments

On poverty, surviving, taxes and economic justice in America

"The Throwaways" by Melissa Chadburn, from 2012. (Via. tw: mentions rape, but not graphically.)
posted by zarq on Apr 9, 2016 - 24 comments

The centre at the edge

Is There Value in Training Scientific Generalists For Positions at the Edge of Academia? Gopal Sarma says Yes
posted by Rumple on Apr 2, 2016 - 28 comments

“It’s a good school. It’s capable of being a better school.”

Price of Admission
Howard University has admitted its troubles. Can it thrive again?
posted by andoatnp on Mar 25, 2016 - 4 comments

Hoof Capsule Removal

This is just a youtube video of a lady pulling the hoof right off of the disembodied foot of a dead horse, as an educational demonstration of equine anatomy and a lesson in the proper care of hooves. Warning: exactly what it sounds like.
posted by Anticipation Of A New Lover's Arrival, The on Mar 10, 2016 - 38 comments

Digital Humanism

The Digital in the Humanities: An Interview with Franco Moretti - "the term 'digital humanities' (DH) has captured the imagination and the ire of scholars across American universities. The field, which melds computer science with hermeneutics, is championed by supporters as the much-needed means to shake up and expand methods of traditional literary interpretation and is seen by its most outspoken critics as a new fad that symbolizes the neoliberal bean counting destroying American higher education. Somewhere in the middle of these two extremes lies a vast and varied body of work that utilizes and critically examines digital tools in the pursuit of humanistic study. [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Mar 9, 2016 - 21 comments

The Secret Service will rest easier without you around on our south lawn

15 seasons.
282 Episodes.
13 years.
Thousands of experiments and explosions.
White House visits, including a failed solar death ray.
And at least one Metafilter debate answered on air.
Goodbye, Mythbusters. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 9, 2016 - 68 comments

"We think kids are so fragile. Tell them the truth. They are resilient."

Researchers have found that students who learn about famous scientists' personal and scientific struggles outperform students who only learn of those scientists' achievements. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Mar 2, 2016 - 44 comments

Algorithmic Education vs Indie EdTech

An algorithmic education, despite all the promises made by ed-tech entrepreneurs for “revolution” and “disruption,” is likely to re-inscribe the power relations that are already in place in school and in society. Whether it's annotating the scholarly web, creating connected copies through wikity or domain of one's own, alternatives to algorithmic education are offered by the indie edtech movement.
posted by typecloud on Feb 12, 2016 - 11 comments

“You’re confusing everybody.”

The New York Times has obtained and published a video of a first grade teacher at the Success Academy, a charter school in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, berating and ripping up the paper of a six year old after the child could not explain to the class how she solved a math problem. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 12, 2016 - 192 comments

More kids more math

"You wouldn’t see it in most classrooms, you wouldn’t know it by looking at slumping national test-score averages, but a cadre of American teenagers are reaching world-class heights in math—more of them, more regularly, than ever before." Peg Tyre in The Atlantic covers the new wave of deeper, faster, and hopefully broader math education. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Feb 8, 2016 - 27 comments

Your Code in Spaaace!

In the ISS there are two Astro Pi computers, Ed and Izzy, equipped with Sense HATs, two different camera modules (visual and IR), and stored in rather special cases. They are now running code written by UK school children - the winners of a competition. The data will be feeding back soon! [more inside]
posted by Stark on Feb 5, 2016 - 3 comments

Looking Back on Romer (1990)

25 years ago, Paul M. Romer's oft-cited article: "Endogenous Technological Change" (pdf) was published in The Journal of Political Economy. In it, he tried to explain how technological progress and knowledge creation affected the dynamics of growth. Romer’s model (pdf) became the "primary engine that fueled a decade-long re-examination of long-term growth in economics." This past October, Dr. Romer posted 7 follow-up blog entries to his historic paper, in order to 'revisit the basics,' starting with: Nonrival Goods After 25 Years. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jan 25, 2016 - 5 comments

10 things to know about progress in international development

10 things to know about progress in international development (.pdf) Around the world, amazing progress is being made. More than 1 billion people have been lifted out of extreme poverty since 1990, with major gains made in health and education and in other areas that contribute to human well-being.

Lots of problems remain of course. And you can still be very poor and not be below the $1.25 (in $2005) line. But a big deal.
posted by hawthorne on Jan 23, 2016 - 9 comments

mapping the college curriculum across 1M+ syllabi

The Open Syllabus Project is pleased to make the beta version of our Syllabus Explorer publicly available. The Explorer leverages a collection of over 1 million syllabi collected from university and departmental websites. [more inside]
posted by betweenthebars on Jan 22, 2016 - 22 comments

Campus Sexual Assault Under Investigation

Campus Sexual Assault Under Investigation: Track Hundreds of Federal Sexual-Assault Investigations
posted by all about eevee on Jan 11, 2016 - 1 comment

More evidence that student evaluations of teaching evaluate gender bias

Inside Higher Ed: There’s mounting evidence suggesting that student evaluations of teaching are unreliable. But are these evaluations, commonly referred to as SET, so bad that they’re actually better at gauging students’ gender bias and grade expectations than they are at measuring teaching effectiveness? A new paper argues that’s the case, and that evaluations are biased against female instructors in particular in so many ways that adjusting them for that bias is impossible. [more inside]
posted by leahwrenn on Jan 11, 2016 - 44 comments

How fortunate you’re not Professor de Breeze

Given that it's no longer widely taught in even the most prestigious high schools in the US and UK, and given the current economic climate, Why should Millennials Study the Classics?
posted by Potomac Avenue on Jan 5, 2016 - 47 comments

The new preschool is crushing kids

"Preschool classrooms have become increasingly fraught spaces, with teachers cajoling their charges to finish their 'work' before they can go play. And yet, even as preschoolers are learning more pre-academic skills at earlier ages, I’ve heard many teachers say that they seem somehow—is it possible?—less inquisitive and less engaged than the kids of earlier generations." [Atlantic]
posted by forza on Dec 20, 2015 - 158 comments

Where "schools aren’t a place to learn, they’re a place to fear."

In 2007, the Pinellas County, Florida School Board abandoned integration, joining hundreds of US school districts in former Confederacy states that have resegregated since 2000. The Board justified the vote with bold promises: Schools in poor, black neighborhoods would get more money, more staff, more resources -- none of which happened. This past August, the Tampa Bay Times published an exposé, revealing how district leaders turned five once-average schools into Failure Factories. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 18, 2015 - 62 comments

A scam like this is going to take years to investigate

Rather than a simple scam, Vyapam appears to be a vast societal swindle—one that reveals the hollowness at the heart of practically every Indian state institution: inadequate schools, a crushing shortage of meaningful jobs, a corrupt government, a cynical middle class happy to cheat the system to aid their own children, a compromised and inept police force and a judiciary incapable of enforcing its laws.
Aman Sethi writes in the Guardian on the so-called Vyapam scam—allegations of high-level and systematic corruption in the administration of the state professional examinations that determine entry into medical schools, state colleges, and entry-level civil service jobs within the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. The scandal has been connected with 48 suspicious deaths involving people implicated in or investigating the scandal. The Indian Express has a timeline of events, while the Times of India has an extensive archive of further coverage.
posted by Sonny Jim on Dec 18, 2015 - 15 comments

"...thou shalt not be a bystander" ― Yehuda Bauer

Hollywood's Last Survivors [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 17, 2015 - 3 comments

גם זו לטובה

Judaism's core texts grew out of millennia-long conversations and arguments across generations, with interconnected dialogues, source citing and (re)interpretation. Now, it's all going digital: Sefaria is creating a massive public domain, interactive "living library of Jewish texts and their interconnections, in Hebrew and translations." Their goal is to build a reference resource and community that "gives a better learning experience than anything that comes before it," from ancient to modern texts and "all the volumes of commentary in between." Read texts, browse submitted public source sheets on dozens of topics or visualize associations between texts.
posted by zarq on Dec 7, 2015 - 22 comments

What Teachers Do

National Education Association president Lily Eskelsen García on what teachers do
posted by aniola on Nov 30, 2015 - 29 comments

1 in 30 American Kids is Homeless. That's about 2.5 Million Children.

A College Guide for Homeless Students (by Resilience.org) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Nov 26, 2015 - 6 comments

Faced with gaping moral and economic holes in society

Rewrite the rules to benefit everyone, not just the wealthy - "If there's one thing Joseph Stiglitz wants to say about inequality, it's that it has been a choice, not an unexpected, unfortunate economic outcome. That's unnerving, but it also means that citizens and politicians have the opportunity to fix the problem before it gets worse." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Nov 11, 2015 - 112 comments

this is a basic civil right

The U.S. Department of Education announced yesterday that an Illinois school district is violating the rights of a transgender student by refusing to allow her the unrestricted use of a girls' locker room. This statement comes one week after the Department of Justice filed a brief supporting Gavin Grimm, a high school student in Virginia who has been denied access to the boy's bathrooms. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 3, 2015 - 55 comments

Obligatory Monty Python Reference Goes Here

Geekfilter: A series of video lectures on how Python works under the hood. (MLYT)
posted by JHarris on Oct 31, 2015 - 9 comments

Are Think Tanks Undermining Australian Democracy?

"Are Think Tanks Undermining Australian Democracy? The past decade, for example, has seen powerful American think tanks (link is external), headed by political elites and backed by significant philanthropic funding, fundamentally re-shape key aspects of schooling. This has raised serious questions about whether elite economic and political actors are ‘working through’ think tanks to undermine democratic processes and the ideals of representative democracy."
posted by man down under on Oct 27, 2015 - 13 comments

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