3025 posts tagged with Film.
Displaying 2201 through 2250 of 3025. Subscribe:

Interpreting Vertov

Interpreting Vertov - an open invitation to reimagine the early Russian filmmaker Dziga Vertov's 1929 'Man with a Movie Camera".
posted by Burhanistan on Jul 18, 2007 - 30 comments

Australia’s audiovisual heritage online

australianscreen launched today. You can view clips from Australian feature films, documentaries, TV programs, shorts, home movies, newsreels, advertisements, other historical footage, and sponsored films produced over the last 100 years, with curators’ notes and other information about each title. [via Margaret and David]
posted by tellurian on Jul 18, 2007 - 8 comments

Kerwin Mathews, RIP

Kerwin Mathews, 1926-2007. The genre actor may be best remembered as the title character in one of my favorite movies, the classic The 7th Voyage of Sinbad.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on Jul 18, 2007 - 8 comments

Robbery,......... Style

Robbery American Style. Robbery French Style. Robbery Italian Style. Classic Soviet animation from Soyuzmultfilm.
posted by TrialByMedia on Jul 14, 2007 - 26 comments

Burroughs

Burroughs
A 1983 documentary by Howard Brookner on William S. Burroughs. 89 mins, G-vid, a bit more inside...
posted by carsonb on Jul 10, 2007 - 13 comments

The Paradox of Michael Bay

You can love him or hate him but Transformers made $250,000,000 last week. To some, Michael Bay is a genius. To others he's a racist hack. Or just a hack. He may even be both a hack and a genius. Is this evidence of an auteur? Or does dude just like really big explosions? Plus: a character driven Bay film?
posted by PostIronyIsNotaMyth on Jul 9, 2007 - 124 comments

The Decision is Binding

NoMediaKings.org will tell you how to hand-bind books in a variety of ways. Then you can make the movie of the book. As a bonus: Time Management for Anarchists.
posted by WPW on Jul 8, 2007 - 10 comments

The Boss of It All

"I'm a control freak-- but I was not in control." Lars von Trier made his latest movie without a cameraman. The Boss of It All (trailer), a comedy, was made with "Automavision", allowing a computer to decide when to tilt, pan, or zoom. The film also employs Lookey, a game that challenges the viewers to spot objects that don’t belong in a scene. The first viewer in Denmark to identify all the Lookeys correctly wins a cash prize and a chance to be an extra in von Trier’s next film.
posted by hermitosis on Jul 4, 2007 - 14 comments

Too Weird for Words

The Holy Mountain is an extremely odd 1973 film by Alejandro Jodorowsky, and the trailer for it is probably the most bizarre single video on Youtube (not an easy feat by any measure). It just doesn't get much weirder than this guy. Well, then again... (none of this is SFW).
posted by dbiedny on Jul 3, 2007 - 72 comments

Augenblick Augenblick Augenblick

Augenblick Studios provide many strange and offensive animated cartoon video films including Superjail. You may be familiar with their work!!! [flash, mayhap quicktime]
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 on Jul 3, 2007 - 7 comments

It's like reality TV, but without reality. Or the TV.

You Choose the Cliff (NYT). In Emmy-winning Satacracy 88, as in other films by itsallinyourhands, viewers' votes determine the next episode. Other films invite more personal interaction. In Mystery at Mansfield Manor viewers interview suspects. In the BBC's Wannabes (produced by Illumina), characters seek viewers' advice. [More Inside]
posted by honest knave on Jun 30, 2007 - 6 comments

Digital Skin Grafting

"In this film, director Shanker wanted to change Rajini's wheatish complexion to a white European complexion. It has taken 25 dedicated CG technicians almost a year to achieve this 6 ½ min. feat."
posted by tighttrousers on Jun 26, 2007 - 42 comments

Virtuoso Vertiginousness

Vertigo got you spinning? The answers to your problems and more are available at the Hitchcock DVD Wiki.
posted by felix on Jun 25, 2007 - 5 comments

feline family

The Private Life of a Cat, 1944, (GoogleVideo, 22 minutes), is a gem of a silent film by Alexander Hammid, about a mother cat giving birth, her relationship with her kittens and mate.
posted by nickyskye on Jun 25, 2007 - 29 comments

Ready to work some yellow magic? No, not like that.

The Simpsons Movie website just went live. In 12 languages, apparently (including non-American English).
posted by miss lynnster on Jun 22, 2007 - 67 comments

M Is For Montage

How to make a film like Hitchcock would have. Also, a sociological perspective on guilt and innocence in Hitchcock's work - rituals of liminality (pdf). (via)
posted by chlorus on Jun 20, 2007 - 16 comments

Elaine Stritch as Ursula? Kinda makes sense...

"Why (For) Pat Carroll wasn't actually Disney's first choice to voice Ursula in 'The Little Mermaid'? The casting story of one of Disney's most delightful demons.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero on Jun 15, 2007 - 18 comments

Koichiro Tsujikawa : self-taught surrealist filmmaker.

Koichiro Tsujikawa : self-taught surrealist filmmaker. Mostly music videos : Like a Rolling Stone .. Eyes [hi-fi, making of] .. Untitled .. Fit Song.. Breezin' .. Tone Twilight Zone .. Wonder Word .. Gakaxy in the Groove .. I Hate Hate
posted by Dave Faris on Jun 11, 2007 - 5 comments

"Father of African film" passes on

Ousmane Sembene, Senegalese writer and filmmaker, has died.
posted by RogerB on Jun 11, 2007 - 16 comments

The Tank Man of Tiananmen Square

17 years since the Tiananmen Square Massacre: The Tank Man [Video Link] Long, but worth it.
posted by Flem Snopes on Jun 9, 2007 - 31 comments

Duck & Cover Film Festival! Wheeeeeee!

"For the quarter-century following World War II, a special kind of classroom film received wide circulation. These "mental hygiene" films thrived in a confused and nervous America. The rebellious behavior of young people challenging the social norms struck fear into the hearts of parents and educators, who saw dark futures for the teens who broke the rules and refused to fit in with society. These concerned adults embraced the metal hygiene film as a new means of delivering social guidance." Program One: Manners, Menstruation and The American Way; Program Two: Dating, Deliquency and Diversity; Program Three: Conformity, Safety and The Bomb

Special Bonus: Amy Sedaris, Paul Dinello, Mitch Rouse & Steven Colbert re-enact How To Be Popular (from Program Two).
posted by miss lynnster on Jun 8, 2007 - 28 comments

Along came a spider ...

"... straight out of Down-Under, explosive stuntman-editor-producer-writer-actor-director Nash Edgerton delivers his latest effort, "Spider", a 9-minute action-thriller that gives an all-new meaning to old Peugeots, stunning blondes and love-jokes."
posted by bwg on Jun 8, 2007 - 35 comments

Don't Be That Guy

Hey! Isn't that the guy from that movie? The 20 best "that guys" of all time -- according to Cracked. (via)
posted by fallenposters on May 30, 2007 - 157 comments

Return to Form

Joel and Ethan Coen rarely disappoint. Their new film, No Country for Old Men (based on a novel by Cormac McCarthy), is no exception. See also: Cannes.
posted by chuckdarwin on May 30, 2007 - 55 comments

The War Prayer

The War Prayer -- Mark Twain's post-humously published anti-war classic, brought to life.
posted by empath on May 28, 2007 - 17 comments

Judd Apatow's Family Values

Judd Apatow's Family Values A look inside the comedic mind that brought us "Freaks and Geeks", "Undeclared", and "The 40 Year Old Virgin". Apatow’s childhood hero was Steve Martin. On a summer trip to L.A., Apatow persuaded his grandparents to drive by Martin’s home until Apatow spied his hero in the driveway. Martin wouldn’t give him an autograph, so Apatow wrote him an angry letter saying it was his patronage of Martin’s projects that allowed him to live the high life. A few weeks later, Martin sent Apatow a copy of his book “Cruel Shoes” with an apology: “I’m sorry. I didn’t realize I was speaking to the Judd Apatow.” Also: Judd and Seth Rogen at play.
posted by ColdChef on May 27, 2007 - 33 comments

Happy Belated 100th, Piiilgrim.

On May 26, 1907, a 13 pound baby boy named Marion Morrison was born in Winterset, Iowa. Nicknamed "Little Duke" after his childhood dog, he grew up to become the most famous icon of American patriotism in the world. When he was a football player at USC, Western filmstar Tom Mix got him a summer job at Fox in exchange for game tickets. After two years working as a prop man for $75 a week, his first acting role was in The Big Trail in 1930. "Marion Morrison" didn't sound like the right name for a trail scout though, so the studio took the last name from a Revolutionary War general and replaced "Anthony" with "John." Voila! A working actor from 1930 through the 1970s, this year John Wayne placed third among America's favorite film stars, the only deceased star on the list and the only one who has appeared every year. He was an opinionated patriot who, surprisingly, called himself a liberal... bigger than life, the consummate cowboy star, and the ultimate symbol of heroic action and the Code of the West. In the end, acting actually took his life indirectly thanks to radiation poisoning during a movie shoot in Utah (of the 220 persons on set, 91 had contracted cancer by the early 1980s), and almost three decades after his death, his family continues to carry on his legacy. He has an an airport, an elementary school, and various Cancer Foundations named after him, and while he wasn't much of a singer or dancer, he remains the ultimate symbol of American manliness to this day. Apparently there are hundreds of reasons to love the guy.

And for the record... no, he wasn't gay.
posted by miss lynnster on May 27, 2007 - 73 comments

and the meteoroid is a stone that's devoid of the fire that propelled it to thee

Paramount does Neil: Gaiman's book (illustrated by Charles Vess) is being made into a film called Stardust. You can watch the trailer or read the first chapter online. The film is directed by Matthew Vaughn, who doesn't exactly have a strong fantasy background. Cross your fingers, Gaimanites.
posted by chuckdarwin on May 16, 2007 - 46 comments

Histoire(s) DVD

Jean-Luc Godard's Histoire(s) du cinéma was recently released on DVD.
posted by RogerB on May 15, 2007 - 15 comments

Puleng

Puleng is a lovely and evocative animated short film (about 3 minutes) with a refreshingly simple yet sophisticated visual style. A poignant little portrait of life ended and life renewed.
posted by flapjax at midnite on May 12, 2007 - 11 comments

Countdown to Snobbery

Top 40: The greatest foreign films of all time as chosen by Guardian readers (complete with snarky comments by the paper's resident film writers).
posted by chuckdarwin on May 11, 2007 - 89 comments

The Long Take.

The Long Take aka "The Greatest Long Tracking Shots in Cinema".
posted by Armitage Shanks on May 9, 2007 - 93 comments

Mathematics in Movies

Mathematics in Movies.
posted by nthdegx on May 6, 2007 - 28 comments

Online documentaries

Biographies, history, science and more. Over 500 of the best online documentaries.
posted by Mblue on May 5, 2007 - 26 comments

Crack, baby, crack, show me you're real.

David Bowie: Cracked Actor – a BBC documentary circa 1974. One|Two|Three|Four|Five (53 minutes)
posted by miss lynnster on May 4, 2007 - 16 comments

Pop your funk

Disco cellist Arthur Russell is the subject of a new documentary. MP3s for those who don't know him: Sidebar here, here, here (photo may be NSFW), more here.
posted by klangklangston on May 3, 2007 - 10 comments

I turned to Virgil and said, "Hang on, I'm not too sure about this."

Dante's Inferno. A surfer-cum-Doré remix of the Divine Comedy's most famous chunk, from the book of the same name. The art of Sandow Birk informs this peculiar, but cool-looking spin on an old classic. Enjoy the trailer in glorious Quicktime, or suffer endlessly with the YouTube version. And while you're at it, check out their previous film - a mockumentary of California's civil war.
posted by Sticherbeast on May 1, 2007 - 13 comments

NYMag's Top Five Tribeca Film Fest shorts

New York Magazine's top five shorts from the Tribeca Film Festival, presented in full, including the 25-minute documentary "Someone Else's War," about third-world contract employees in Iraq. A bit more inside. [via Nerve's Screengrab]
posted by mediareport on Apr 29, 2007 - 6 comments

Hit Record [dot] Org

Hit Record -- the website of child actor-turned-respectable young thespian Joseph Gordon-Levitt. [more inside]
posted by pxe2000 on Apr 28, 2007 - 34 comments

Your favourite film sucks

'In defense of film critics' posits that 'Film critics [unlike food critics, etc] are expected to be cheerleaders.' I guess we're not supposed to think it's odd that the piece was written by paper's resident film critic. He does ask at least one good question, though: why have so many truly awful [and poorly reviewed ] films done so well at the the box office this year?
posted by chuckdarwin on Apr 27, 2007 - 36 comments

Jack Valenti, adieau

Jack Valenti, RIP.
posted by Astro Zombie on Apr 26, 2007 - 93 comments

"I ain't a pretty boy no more"

"I ain’t a pretty boy no more" Roger Ebert is determined to attend his Overlooked Film Festival tomorrow.
We spend too much time hiding illness. There is an assumption that I must always look the same. I hope to look better than I look now. But I'm not going to miss my festival.
[via]
posted by kirkaracha on Apr 24, 2007 - 124 comments

Best. Fake. Shark. EVAH.

The year is 1978. A group of 12 year-olds have decided to make a Super 8 film of their own based on Jaws. Presenting... SHARK!
posted by miss lynnster on Apr 23, 2007 - 34 comments

Let's see if Jesus will bring you candy!

If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do? (1971). This film based on the pro-Jesus/anti-Commie teachings of Baptist minister Dr. Estus Washington Pirkle (3/12/1930–3/3/05) warns what will happen to America if the citizens do not give up their depraved ways and turn to God and Jesus for salvation. Fun for the whole family! Also by Reverend Pirkle: The Burning Hell & The Believer's Heaven. Good times.
posted by miss lynnster on Apr 20, 2007 - 22 comments

L'inventaire Fantôme

L'inventaire Fantôme - an excellent and creepy animated short film (official site). Liked it? You might also enjoy the charming L'Animateur, not least for its soundtrack. Both found via StopMoShorts.
posted by Wolfdog on Apr 16, 2007 - 11 comments

War of the Welles: The Torturous Journey of The Other Side of the Wind to the Big Screen

The Other Side of the Wind is the lost last film of Orson Welles, a reputed unseen masterpiece, that may finally see the light of day in late 2008. The film tells the story of Jake Hannaford (played by John Huston), an aging movie director who has to film a low budget sex-and-symbolism flick to avoid getting overtaken by the Movie Brats of the Spielberg/Coppola generation. After providing voiceovers to two documentaries on the Persepolis ceremonies of 1971 and an intimate portrait of the Shah of Iran, Welles obtained Iranian financing to finish The Other Side of the Wind. Unfortunately, after the Islamic Revolution of 1979, the bank accounts of his Iranian financier were seized, which led to the negatives for the film getting locked in a French vault. After Orson Welles died in 1985, his lover/collaborator Oja Kodar had to settle his estate with Orson's estranged (but never divorced) wife Paola Mori. There the matter might have rested, if not for an unfortunate coincidence. (More inside.)
posted by jonp72 on Apr 15, 2007 - 50 comments

Roscoe Lee Browne. RIP, Mr. Nightlinger.

Roscoe Lee Browne, class act from beginning to end. The first time I ever noticed him was in The Cowboys, a western I've watched many times just to hear him speak.
posted by loosemouth on Apr 13, 2007 - 18 comments

I've heard it's the fillet of the web.

Noah Baumbach, Writer and Director of The Squid and the Whale, has a short film on youtube. 1--2--3
posted by jne1813 on Apr 10, 2007 - 19 comments

Hanna-Barbera never did this.

Cloned Disney cels: page 1 [Russian, bad English], page 2 [Russian, bad English]
posted by thirteenkiller on Apr 10, 2007 - 25 comments

Golden Ratios

Did the roof of the Pantheon influence Copernicus? Are the planets of the solar system aligned in accordance with a nearly-forgotten hypothesis known (unfairly) as Bode's Law? A fascinating wide-ranging discussion on BLDGBLOG with Walter Murch, the visionary editor and sound designer for such films as The Conversation, Apocalypse Now, The English Patient, THX1138, and many others. [Murch's film work has previously been discussed here and here.]
posted by digaman on Apr 7, 2007 - 20 comments

Page: 1 ... 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 ... 61