1759 posts tagged with Food.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 1759. Subscribe:

“Tofu was a tough sell"

In what remains a QVC record, Ina Garten — the only guest who Mr. Venable says made him feel like a crazed teenager at a rock concert — sold out of 30,000 copies of her latest book in 25 minutes 4 seconds. And that doesn’t take into account what the publishing industry calls the QVC effect. That is, the extra sales and marketing power that rises up through Amazon sales and bookstore orders because QVC has deemed a book worthy. -- QVC’s David Venable: The Man Who Helps America Cook by Kim Severson, New York Times
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 4, 2016 - 15 comments

"A Stir‐Fried Masterpiece"

Peng Chang-kuei, the inventor of General Tso's Chicken, has died at the age of 98. Peng first made the dish in the 1950s while working for the Nationalist government in Taiwan, naming it for Zuo Zongtang, a statesman and military leader from the Qing dynasty famous for having put down the Taiping Rebellion (previously). When the dish made it to the U.S., the New York Times' Mimi Sheraton raved about it using the words in the post title. [more inside]
posted by Cash4Lead on Dec 2, 2016 - 33 comments

It was just salt.

When you emigrate, you end up the last person to touch a lot of your family history. Somewhere along the line, we’ll forget my mom’s maiden name. We’ll forget what her actual name was before she changed it when she moved. We’ll lose language and the way to make a candle from ghee and a cotton ball. I can’t pull all of this information out of her, and I can’t carry all of it after she’s gone, and I panic when I think about how impossible it feels to one day not need her. But at least I can try to cook.
posted by ChuraChura on Dec 1, 2016 - 18 comments

But I wanted a circular pancake

A simple but ingenious pancake-making machine. [more inside]
posted by Stark on Nov 30, 2016 - 25 comments

Cooking/Maryland/History

A Maryland Food History Blog: 300 Years of Black Cooking in St. Mary’s County---Free State Oyster Omelet ---Interview with a Maryland Waterman---Mrs. Kitching’s Clam Chowder
posted by josher71 on Nov 18, 2016 - 16 comments

The American Thanksgiving

Fifteen families share with the New York Times their traditional Thanksgiving dishes. Recipes for all are collected here.
posted by backseatpilot on Nov 17, 2016 - 63 comments

Native American Ethnobotany Database

A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants.
posted by aniola on Nov 13, 2016 - 6 comments

There is no sincerer love than the love of food.

Food Decoration Fails — when your meal looks worse than you feel.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Nov 9, 2016 - 46 comments

RIP Product 19 ...................

"PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don't discontinue this cereal," one fan wrote on Kellogg's community boards a few months ago. " I LOVE LOVE LOVE this cereal!" The Long Death of Product 19, the Most Beloved Cereal You've Never Heard Of [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Nov 7, 2016 - 87 comments

Agrindus Come Round: Eating Your Ethics or Mouth On the Money

Eating Right, Harper's, by John Herron I think that the metaphor of seeing ethics in terms of a supermarket array of consumption decisions is all too pervasive in contemporary society. -- Philosopher Paul B. Thompson [more inside]
posted by lazycomputerkids on Nov 6, 2016 - 8 comments

tofu misozuke

I am just so in love with tofu misozuke that I thought I would share a recipe with y'all since they say it's hard to find, even in Japan. Think: tofu with bite like “Roquefort at the limit of ripeness” [more inside]
posted by aniola on Nov 3, 2016 - 33 comments

The uncertain history of Hollandaise: dueling stories of a tasty sauce

Hollandaise sauce might sound like a typical Dutch delicacy, however, it isn’t from the Netherlands at all, and instead was originally called Sauce Isigny (Google books) after a town in Normandy, Isigny-sur-Mer, known for its butter and other dairy products, but was renamed Sauce Hollandaise in World War I when butter was imported from Holland. Or was it? (Gb). When the once exiled Huguenots returned from northern Europe back to France, they may have brought a creamy, lemony sauce known as Sauce à la Hollandaise, as listed there in François Marin's 1758 cookbook Les Dons de Comus, and similarly in The Book of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton as "Dutch Sauce for Fish," and "Green sauce, or Hollandaise verte" (Archive.org). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 2, 2016 - 58 comments

It's time to bake a cake

BBC News: As the sun rises over the Old World Levain (OWL) Bakery in Asheville, North Carolina, a heady, warm scent of spices floats through the air outside. In the kitchen, bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are working with sourdough culture, dried fruit, butter, sorghum syrup and generous measures of sherry and whisky to revive an American tradition. Bon Appetit: Werner opted for an earthy rye and buckwheat base, with bourbon-bolstered stone fruits, and a toothsome mix of poppy seeds, flax seeds, and cocoa nibs. Miscovich chose an egalitarian version filled with currants and spices, minus the booze, so that everyone can partake. Actual recipe and another recipe, and a related 2014 song from Eurovision. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Nov 1, 2016 - 22 comments

"It suddenly looks like it's made for cooking"

In Food Hacking, a documentary series of shorts from Vice's Munchies, host Simon Klose explores the people and science mapping out new boundaries of Japanese cuisine, as well as their social and environmental implications. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 27, 2016 - 3 comments

Or you could just buy some Eggos

Stranger Things is streaming on Netflix, so just in time for Halloween, Netflix Kitchens shows you how to make French Onion Barb and Demogorgon Pie.
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 24, 2016 - 9 comments

Delicious in any language

The PBS documentary series "The Migrant Kitchen" explores Los Angeles’ booming food scene through the eyes of a new generation of chefs whose cuisine is inspired by the immigrant experience. The filmmakers visit the kitchens of those who have transformed the culinary landscape of the city, combining traditional ethnic cuisines and a fusion of new flavors and techniques. Ep 1: Chirmol: How a Guatemalan Tradition Journeyed to an American Menu; Ep 2: Barkada: L.A.’s Exploding Filipino Food Movement; Ep 3: Mercado: Artisanal Street Food & L.A.'s Best Mole; Ep 4: Loghmeh: Whole Animal Roasts & Middle-Eastern Culinary Traditions; Ep 5: Banchan: Korean Food Beyond BBQ. [Scroll down the pages for related background and recipes.]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 22, 2016 - 9 comments

A Snack Tray to Gather the Family Around

The lady in seat 4F, though, the one in the light cashmere pullover reading the newspaper, she clicked the latch on her seat-back tray and said: “Double Smirnoff, on the rocks. And Doritos.” NYTimes [more inside]
posted by mosessis on Oct 21, 2016 - 53 comments

The secret behind Italy's rarest pasta

"[I]n a modest apartment in the town of Nuoro, a slight 62-year-old named Paola Abraini wakes up every day at 7 am to begin making su filindeu – the rarest pasta in the world."
posted by SansPoint on Oct 20, 2016 - 53 comments

"a history lesson, a geopolitical reflection and a mouthwatering decent"

Our Fancy Foods, Ourselves - Three days at the world's greatest assemblage of exotic, expensive, absurd, and occasionally delicious snacks [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 16, 2016 - 7 comments

so put away that meat you're selling

"Millions of containers, thousands of ships, hundreds of scientists, 30 laws, 15 federal agencies, and we still can't prevent the next foodborne illness outbreak."

[Fun supplementary reading: FDA Defect Levels Handbook, FSIS Meat & Poultry Hazards & Controls Guide, CDC Foodborne Outbreak Investigations.]
posted by amnesia and magnets on Oct 11, 2016 - 12 comments

Maximum Nutrition with Minimal Effort

People get “violently ill” from Soylent bars; company stumped
posted by almostmanda on Oct 11, 2016 - 141 comments

Super Size

The Dizzying Grandeur of 21st Century Agriculture [NYT link] Our industrialized food system nourishes more people, at lower cost, than any comparable system in history. It also exerts a terrifyingly massive influence on our health and our environment. Photographer George Steinmetz spent nearly a year traveling the country to capture that system, in all its scope, grandeur and dizzying scale. His photographs are all the more remarkable for the fact that so few large food producers are willing to open themselves to this sort of public view [more inside]
posted by helmutdog on Oct 5, 2016 - 25 comments

“Cranking out more and more boxes was all they cared about.”

The Box: The Not-So-Wholesome Reality Behind The Making of Your Meal Kit [Buzzfeed] “Blue Apron wants to revolutionize the food system by selling would-be home cooks all the ingredients they need to make a meal without setting foot in the grocery store. But a BuzzFeed News investigation has found that in the rush to scale its supply chain at the speed of startup, the company has had health and safety violations, violent incidents, and unhappy workers at one of its packing facilities.”
posted by Fizz on Oct 3, 2016 - 83 comments

The Politics of Dancing

The economics of dining as a couple - "I am eternally astonished to find not only that many couples I know failed to discuss this key area before they marched up to the altar, but also that many of them still have not developed a joint dining strategy even after 10 or 20 years together. This is madness." Megan McArdle blends economics and marriage therapy.
posted by GuyZero on Oct 2, 2016 - 98 comments

You’ve been drinking SQUASH FREAKING SPICE LATTES this entire time

I just found out canned pumpkin isn't actually pumpkin at all, and my whole life is basically a lie. By Emma Crist at Food & Wine.
posted by Mchelly on Sep 28, 2016 - 111 comments

Daily life for kids in Japan.

Why Japanese bathrooms are the best. What a Japanese apartment is like. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
posted by Bee'sWing on Sep 24, 2016 - 63 comments

I should have just eaten the 18 pounds of Red Leicester.

Deccan Chronicle: "In a study that has been widely welcomed, researchers from the University of Copenhagen found that eating cheese is good for our hearts." More from [askmen] [delish] [allure] [Telegraph - mentions other studies]. The actual research article conclusion: "A high daily intake of regular-fat cheese for 12 weeks did not alter LDL cholesterol or MetS risk factors differently than an equal intake of reduced-fat cheese or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods."
posted by Wordshore on Sep 24, 2016 - 40 comments

Coming soon to a state fair near you

What do you get when you literally cross a hamburger with a hotdog? Hamdog!
posted by ardgedee on Sep 21, 2016 - 114 comments

God's Own Country: the nation of Yorkshire

Yorkshire is a county in t'north of England. It has a distinct range of dialects; for example 'nowt' means 'nothing', 'who?' means 'what?' and 'how are you?' is asked ... differently, with further variations across the county. Yorkshire is famous for its pudding, caustic cricket commentary, rhubarb, having its own day, one of the earliest surviving film fragments, the chocolate bar, poetry, tea, and ferret legging (alternative explanation). The anthem of Yorkshire, On Ilkla Moor Baht 'at, is about hats, death and cannibalism. Like other English regions, such as Cornwall and Wessex, Yorkshire has movements towards devolution, greater autonomy and ultimately independence. But what is the essence of Yorkshire? [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Sep 20, 2016 - 39 comments

“Ooooh, floor pie!”

‘Five-Second Rule’ for Food on Floor Is Untrue, Study Finds [The New York Times] “You may think your floors are so clean you can eat off them, but a new study debunking the so-called five-second rule would suggest otherwise. Professor Donald W. Schaffner, a food microbiologist at Rutgers University in New Jersey, said a two-year study he led concluded that no matter how fast you pick up food that falls on the floor, you will pick up bacteria with it. The findings in the report — “Is the Five-Second Rule Real?” — appeared online this month in the American Society for Microbiology’s journal, Applied and Environmental Microbiology.”
posted by Fizz on Sep 19, 2016 - 123 comments

Potatoes and cheese are friends!

Aligot? It's a legendary blend of mashed potatoes, cheese, butter, cream, and garlic from the Aubrac region in France. Aligot en français. Aligot!
posted by Orange Dinosaur Slide on Sep 16, 2016 - 51 comments

What Asian American Kids Bring for Lunch

Have You Ever Had a ‘Lunch Box Moment’? NBC Asian America has a video project called Jubilee Project: Voices in which Asian Americans are asked a single question about the Asian American experience. In the first video, Asian American adults recall what it was like to bring their family's tradition foods to the school lunchroom when everyone else had packed peanut butter and jelly.
posted by zutalors! on Sep 10, 2016 - 68 comments

Seriously, they do a lot of cleaning

One Day at Panda Express
posted by almostmanda on Sep 9, 2016 - 51 comments

Knives Out

Ian Parker writes about The New York Times' restaurant reviewer: Pete Wells Has His Knives Out
Previously, previously, previously.
posted by Joe in Australia on Sep 5, 2016 - 21 comments

Cookie Art

Amber Spiegel is a cookie artist. Using the nomnomnom de plume "sweetambs " she offers short video lessons in royal icing artistry on Instagram and longer lessons on YouTube, Facebook, and her own blog. [Note: videos have (soothing) background music.]
posted by Room 641-A on Sep 3, 2016 - 9 comments

But that's up to you!

All Chef John rhymes from 2012 to 2015.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Sep 2, 2016 - 12 comments

Deep-fat fryers and dunking Jaffa Cakes: a nation further divided

As the UK continues to absorb the implications of the Brexit referendum vote, further splits open due to the (possibly overcooked) arguments between TV cooking show hosts. The declaration of one, that “no family should own a deep-fat fryer” leads to the reply that “...the UK was built on chips and spam fritters.” Host hostilities are further inflamed by the cultural flashpoint of whether Jaffa Cakes should, or could, be dunked in tea, with the retort of “We don't do that in the south, you know.” (Previously [1] and [2]) [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Aug 28, 2016 - 92 comments

“the way of the sword, the way of the chef”

Food Manga: Where Culture, Conflict And Cooking All Collide [NPR.org] “In Japan, nearly every interest has a manga dedicated to it, whether it's sports, music or shooting pool. So it's no wonder that food, which has always been tied to Japan's cultural identity, has skyrocketed as a genre of manga, which represents about 40 percent of all books published in that country. Food manga first appeared in the 1980s, when the Japanese economy was strong, says Nancy Stalker, professor of Japanese history and culture at the University of Texas at Austin. One of the first, Oishinbo, ran for more than 20 years and became the basis for an anime series, as have many manga since. Conflict and cooking are at the heart of many food manga: Food Wars, Soldier of Food, Wakakozake, Detective Glutton, Solitary Gourmet, Criminal Grub, Cooking Master Boy, Antique Bakery, High Plains Gourmet.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 28, 2016 - 38 comments

"They didn't want people to become too happy with receiving food relief"

"Whatever [the ingredients] taste like together is not particularly relevant." Terry Gross interviews married culinary historians Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe on the culinary history of the Great Depression and their new book 'A Square Meal' (37:00 audio, transcribed sections)
posted by The Whelk on Aug 27, 2016 - 50 comments

“an ahead-of-its-time innovation and an exactly-of-its-time decadence”

The Legend of the Choco Taco [Eater] “For just about everyone other than the French inventor of the Cronut, the Choco Taco [wiki] is the stuff of nostalgic summer sweet tooth obsession — the most beloved and innovative of all the American ice cream "novelties." Its acolytes are legion. Restaurant pastry chefs and boutique scoop shop owners regularly pay homage.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 26, 2016 - 30 comments

How hot is too hot?

The Food Lab teams up with Adam Savage's (MeFi's own) Tested to find the perfect method for searing steaks.
posted by Harald74 on Aug 26, 2016 - 18 comments

Not just a menu item, but a way of lunch

The Slow & Sad Death of Seattle's Iconic Teriyaki Scene (Thrillist) But new Seattle -- with the locals priced out of the area, those that remain forgetting teriyaki exists, and newcomers ignoring it -- risks losing those real shops for good. Teriyaki could be heading the direction of deep-dish… just ask a Chicagoan about it and they’ll say, “Oh, that’s for tourists.” Teriyaki is from a different era, and it’s fading as fast as traffic-free days on I-5. Since teriyaki came to town, Seattle’s waved goodbye to the Kingdome, Kurt Cobain, and the Sonics. A signature stadium, a signature musician, a signature team -- and now, perhaps, a signature dish. [more inside]
posted by CrystalDave on Aug 25, 2016 - 81 comments

Edible uses of cheese

In Sweden, they dice it and pour coffee over it, while in Minnesota they dice it and smother in crushed seasoned tortilla chips (previously). Some people add a banana on the side, or perhaps some blackberries. Other people turn it into waffles, or put it inside vegetables. TV chefs bake it with paprika, or turn it into a pinwheel. In Florida, it is hidden in pie crusts, while others hide it inside bread, and others drizzle honey on their balls. But how do you eat yours? [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Aug 25, 2016 - 81 comments

(what the dormouse said)

"Welcome to Five Course Trivia! Five days a week, we’ll post five questions about something from the culinary world, from soup to nuts and all dishes in between."
posted by Iridic on Aug 24, 2016 - 10 comments

#breakfast

"By elevating the otherwise ordinary experience of eating breakfast into a social event, even if that socializing is all digital, the solitude of many breakfasts becomes more bearable." Breakfast on Instagram Is Magical and Insanely Popular, by Alana Massey for Extra Crispy.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 24, 2016 - 22 comments

“A place with so much atmosphere you have to push it aside to get in.”

As TGI Friday's goes minimalist, signalling the demise of restaurant Americana kitsch, what happens to all the antiques? Containing a pretty fascinating and comprehensive history of the development of the "good-time" chain restaurant/bar and the antique-picking and design work that created its signature feel. Previously.
posted by Miko on Aug 21, 2016 - 206 comments

Fictitious Feasts

A series of pictures of food as eaten in world famous scenes in literature. Charles Roux creates these fictitious meals, photographs them and then eats them. His goal is to collect the photographs in a book, putting the meals back on paper, where they belong.
posted by Too-Ticky on Aug 20, 2016 - 48 comments

Eat your breakfast

A Suggestion on How to Spend a Day at Home (Or: A Breakfast Manifesto). By Mouse Reeve.
posted by mbrubeck on Aug 19, 2016 - 28 comments

My Venezuela Nightmare

A 30-Day Hunt for Food in a Starving Land [more inside]
posted by poffin boffin on Aug 11, 2016 - 16 comments

Madam you have got to be joking. You cannot contain the Boris.

NO BS, JUST SHOOTING - DOOM overview is a heartfelt game review from Life of Boris. Boris will inform you about many aspects of Slav life, including How to squat like slav and Why Slavs wear Adidas. Also Russian language. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Aug 10, 2016 - 11 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 36