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34 posts tagged with GIS.
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100% NZ Wool

Florian Pucher makes carpets. Europe. Africa. Netherlands. USA. More. Story.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 7, 2014 - 7 comments

Let Freedom Ring...and Be Mapped

Esri Enables Federal Agencies To Open GIS Mapping Data To The Public ESRI is the world's leading maker of GIS software. Their initiative is incredibly important in making mapped/mappable data available to the world. They are basically giving government agencies an Easy Button for opening this up to the public. [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on Jul 1, 2014 - 34 comments

It's 11 o'clock, do you know where you cat is?

Map My Cat: "So we have a cat, well we have three cats actually. One of them is a ‘little’ overweight, so we put her on a diet. She didn’t seem to loose any weight. We assume she is probably finding other food sources, like friendly neighbours. So what did we do next? Well, normal people would do things like keep their cats inside (ours are kept inside at night but allowed out during the day), or maybe they would buy a tag that says do not feed. But we are geeks and needed a more sophisticated solution." Note: This blog contains cat photos. And maps. So that should pretty much get the internet excited.
posted by jacquilynne on Apr 13, 2013 - 43 comments

The Drinkers Guide to New York

If you're celebrating St. Patrick's Day or March Madness in New York, the State Liquor Authority can help plan your festivities with this handy guide to every establishment in the state of New York licensed to sell alcohol. [more inside]
posted by cedar on Mar 11, 2012 - 8 comments

V.I.L.E. henchmen are still nowhere to be seen

MeFi's own Alan Taylor brings us another crop of stunning aerial imagery from Google Earth, inviting you to guess what you're looking at. Now with multiple choice! (previously)
posted by theodolite on Nov 29, 2011 - 47 comments

An MBTA Business Day

What does a day's worth of activity look like for Boston's transportation system? Via bostonography, which has been featured previously.
posted by Eideteker on Nov 8, 2011 - 26 comments

City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program

The City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program manages information about hundreds of murals that have made Philadelphia famous. Muralfarm.org is the site where information about the growing body of public art created by the Mural Arts Program has been planted. Pictures and detailed information about murals can be searched by artist, theme, date, location, neighborhood, and other key terms. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Oct 7, 2011 - 12 comments

Cartography Geeks

Bostonography is the study of Greater Boston, Massachusetts through maps and graphics. This site is run by a pair of cartography geeks; Andy Woodruff of Axis Maps, and Tim Wallace. [more inside]
posted by netbros on May 1, 2011 - 19 comments

City of Trees

A map of every street tree in Washington, DC.
posted by schmod on Apr 29, 2011 - 33 comments

From #elxn40 to #elxn41: Mapping Canada's last most recent federal election

Cédric Sam has released an updated version of his 2008 Google Maps and Google Earth layers showing Canada's 2008 federal election data in every riding across the country, accessible down to the polling district level. A great GIS data visualization tool for understanding how your riding or district may vote on May 2.
posted by HLD on Apr 10, 2011 - 5 comments

Where we are. Who we are.

The New York Times presents an interactive map of America's population separated by race, income, and education, according to census data from 2005 to 2009. One dot for every 50 people. (Previously) [more inside]
posted by schmod on Dec 15, 2010 - 80 comments

White Flight and Federal Policy: Tipping Points, Self-Sorting, or Federally Sorted?

"The history of greater St. Louis, is bound up in a tangle of local, state, and federal policies that explicitly and decisively sorted the City’s growing population by race." Mapping Decline visually connects and tracks the history of laws, zoning, urban renewal projects, and their effect on white flight in St. Louis.
posted by stratastar on Oct 23, 2010 - 48 comments

geography geek blogs

50 Best Blogs for Geography Geeks. Among the picks are Geographicus- Rare & Antique Map Blog l Atlas Obscura l The Rural Blog l Geographic Travels l Climate Progress l Edible Geography l DIY Cartography and Geobabble with a list of some excellent geography sites that were not included.
posted by nickyskye on Sep 9, 2010 - 13 comments

Free Geography Tools

Free Geography Tools is Leszek Pawlowicz's invaluable collection of GIS links. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jul 23, 2010 - 13 comments

Geodata about China stays in China.

The Great Firewall just got a little taller. Starting next month, all geo data about China must be stored on servers inside China. This is much more that a snub of Google for moving its data out of the mainland, it is a power play aimed at controlling a type of data about which China is very sensitive, as shown in recent border disputes, and the discovery of secret military installations. [more inside]
posted by CheeseDigestsAll on May 21, 2010 - 25 comments

The notebook of cartographer Zachary Forest Johnson.

The notebook of cartographer Zachary Forest Johnson. There is lots of good stuff here. For example, political cartography: voting with our pocketbooks, or this biography of Wild Bill Bunge.
posted by chunking express on Mar 23, 2010 - 1 comment

The Revolution Will Be Mapped

The Revolution Will Be Mapped. "GIS mapping technology is helping underprivileged communities get better services — from education and transportation to health care and law enforcement — by showing exactly what discrimination looks like."
posted by chunking express on Jan 4, 2010 - 40 comments

OASIS

The New York City Open Accessible Space Information System Cooperative (OASIS) is an online, interactive mapping and data analysis application that gives an incredibly detailed view of New York City's open spaces and how they are used. The map enables overlays of information like: transit; parks, playgrounds and open space; zoning and landmarks; current and historical land use; social services; demographics; and environmental characteristics.(via The Ministry of Type, who like OASIS mainly for its pretty map possibilities.) [more inside]
posted by ocherdraco on Dec 15, 2009 - 5 comments

NOLA Cycle Project

One effect of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans was to render existing bike maps of the city obsolete and incomplete. The NOLA Cycle Bike Map Project is a grassroots effort to create a comprehensive, freely-available bicycle map for New Orleans (like those that already exist for Chicago, Portland, and other cities). Because the project is driven by DIY maps produced by individuals and by volunteer social events organized around mapping different locations that can then be added to the project's database, it's been described as "Wiki-style involvement in the real world." (Here's some video of the project.) [more inside]
posted by liketitanic on Oct 29, 2009 - 4 comments

City of Women

Women are finally putting Rio's favelas on the map. They're competing for a journalism scholarship by loading the most data from their GPS-enabled phones to Wikimapa (a name easily confused with Wikimapia). The data, including addresses, photos, and business details are not likely to be collected by Navteq's and Google's high-tech vans anytime soon due to the notorious danger. [more inside]
posted by ATXile on Oct 19, 2009 - 9 comments

Monopoly and Google maps mashup

Tomorrow, Monopoly City Streets begins, introducing a world-wide game combining google maps and the classic family fight-starter. Buy any street in the world, build houses, hotels and more. Remember, property always goes up, and your siblings always cheat.
posted by pompomtom on Sep 7, 2009 - 25 comments

Attention Map Nerds

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library has an online atlas of U.S. States and how their county boundaries have changed over time. Once you have your state on the screen, type in a date and you will see the historical county borders over the current borders. [more inside]
posted by marxchivist on Aug 31, 2009 - 11 comments

Don't go in there!

The Road to Moloch. A short film. Will the genre of rag-tag band of (battle-hardened soldiers/sex-crazy students/escaped convicts) stumbles upon (cave in the desert/cabin in the woods/house on the hill) and unearths (unspeakable zombie terror/undead apocalypse/soul stealing demons) ever get old?
posted by jadayne on Aug 18, 2009 - 13 comments

Digital Archaeological Atlas of the Holy Land

The Digital Archaeological Atlas of the Holy Land is a comprehensive spatially-referenced database of current archaeological knowledge of all periods of Levantine history and prehistory. Spatial search is a good entry point, as are the Palestine Exploration Fund historic maps. You can also search by time period or dig into the many ancient Empires of the area. Or just look at everything in the database. The site is a work in progress, but a cool one powered by a consortium of over 30 professional archaeologists. May require Google Maps. via
posted by Rumple on Mar 3, 2009 - 4 comments

Geowanking

"We can have all the applications and Internet connectivity [...] but that still won't get at issues of lack of electricity and cartographic literacy and suppression of geospatial information by the state and their complicit corporations" reads a recent post on Geowanking, a mailing list for GIS nerds. [SLMLP] [more inside]
posted by finite on Oct 9, 2008 - 13 comments

Maps revolutionize study of carbon dioxide emissions

New maps show US fossil fuel emissions aren't where we thought they were. The Vulcan Project collects more accurate data at a higher resolution than previous studies. Explanatory video. via [more inside]
posted by desjardins on Apr 7, 2008 - 28 comments

Rents are rising: News at 11

Rents are up in San Francisco. CraigStatsSF can tell you by how much over the last year. (coming soon: NYC, Chicago, Toronto, Boston, and more. What neighborhoods are hot? (Heatmaps are cool). Firefox is your friend.
posted by rtha on Sep 14, 2007 - 45 comments

Philly in 3-D

Is a "virtual" Philly even better than the real thing? Well, GeoSim Systems thinks so. Except for the aroma of freshly-grilled cheesesteak, at least. Their "Virtual Philadelphia" is the most detailed urban imaging system I've seen yet, and you can read about the monumental process of turning photographic images (taken from both aircraft and street-level) into this incredible rendering in a February 17 NY Times article (reg req). And - as expected - Google wants to get in on the action and do the same thing in San Francisco. via BB
posted by luriete on Jun 10, 2005 - 29 comments

Wow.

The before and after tsunami photos have been synced-up and they highlight even more (if that's possible) the power of the sea. Saomeone has geo-aligned the various before and after aerial and satellite photos and adjusted the scale to provide a very accurate then/now comparison.
posted by mmahaffie on Jan 7, 2005 - 41 comments

Because I Don't Want to Think About A Gay GWB

The Official Web Site of the Zipcode Man will help us clear our mental palates.
posted by mmahaffie on Sep 4, 2004 - 9 comments

Sometimes An Elephant Is Just An Elephant

The Peace Parks Foundation is an international, neutral body that coordinates the creation of "Peace Parks" -- a more foundation friendly name for "Transfrontier Conservation Areas." Peace Parks are defined as "relatively large protected areas, which straddle international frontiers between two or more countries and cover large-scale natural systems encompassing one or more protected areas."

Executive Vice-Chairman Willem van Riet of South Africa, in San Diego, California, this month to receive the Presidential Award from GIS software giant ESRI, is that Peace Parks remove the fences of international frontiers -- the "scars of history" -- to let elephants resume their natural migratory paths. An early success of this idea was profiled in full and stunning color by the National Geographic in 2001.
posted by mmahaffie on Aug 22, 2004 - 6 comments

Time's Person of the Year

"They swept across Iraq and conquered it in 21 days. They stand guard on streets pot-holed with skepticism and rancor. They caught Saddam Hussein. They are the face of America, its might and good will, in a region unused to democracy. The U.S. G.I. is Time's Person of the Year." [more inside]
posted by kirkaracha on Dec 21, 2003 - 67 comments

old japan maps

A bunch of very beautiful Old Japanese Maps has been put online. Java application Insight(tm) required to view and includes a nifty GIS application to overlay old maps on current maps with 3-D animated fly-throughs. State of the art in online map presentation "The digital images are even better than the originals because you can amplify them, rotate them to look at them from different angles," Mr. Zhou said. "In practical terms, this is a better way of using the material than actually coming here to see the pieces."
posted by stbalbach on Apr 13, 2003 - 5 comments

Map enthusiasts might enjoy The Geography Network, a new venture from ESRI, vendor of the most used GIS system. The site includes an in-browser viewer, so you don't need to own any ESRI products to see the free data. If you do, though, the data's yours for the downloading. They've already got the latest TIGER census maps as well as a ton of maps and information from around the globe. They hope to create a central location for GIS data sharing, and they're off to a good start.
posted by ewagoner on May 10, 2001 - 4 comments

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