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Toronto Historical Map viewer

The Toronto Historical Map viewer (created by Nathan Ng, also behind the Historical Maps of Toronto website) is a zoomable map that allows the viewer to shift between maps of the city at numerous points from 1818 to 2012. [more inside]
posted by ricochet biscuit on Feb 18, 2014 - 13 comments

 

Hygienic and Scientific Cooking

"....many a tragic episode in family life is superinduced by the baleful influence of a tortured stomach. Mighty is the hand that holds the ballot-box, but mightier is the hand that wields to advantage the pepper-box, the salt-spoon, and the sugar-shaker." read the entirely of Maud C. Cooke's, Breakfast, Dinner and Supper; or, What To Eat and How To Prepare It (1897) online and enter a world of home remedies, large scale recipes, sound advice, leftover wizardry, squirrel stews, scientific digestion, and horrible things done to vegetables.
posted by The Whelk on Jan 17, 2014 - 12 comments

A few cups of good cheer

A Bar Above presents 25 freely available classic bartending books providing a wealth of drinks (and otherwise fascinating information) to liven up your holiday season. These are hosted on Google's Play service, so a Google account might be necessary to access. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Dec 10, 2013 - 9 comments

The 'grotesque beauty' of medieval Britons' diseased bones

Digitised Diseases is an open access resource featuring human bones which have been digitised using 3D laser scanning, CT and radiography. The resource focuses on a wide range of pathological type specimens from archaeological and historical medical collections, specifically examples of chronic diseases which affect the human skeleton for which many of the physical changes are often not directly observable within clinical practice. Of major interest to many will be high fidelity photo-realistic digital representations of 3D bones that can be viewed, downloaded and manipulated on their computer, tablet or smartphone. [more inside]
posted by shoesfullofdust on Dec 9, 2013 - 7 comments

Touch Isolation

Touch Isolation: How Homophobia Has Robbed All Men of Touch, a reflection prompted in part by Bosom Buddies: A Photo History of Male Affection
posted by Pater Aletheias on Nov 17, 2013 - 122 comments

The dawn of an era, available and emulated in your browser to play.

A few months ago there was a list of links to classic video game emulators posted. Very recently, I'm pleased to report, those links all came true. The Internet Archive bespoke upon aforementioned consoles, computers, and mileposts on our way to the tech utopia of today, (seriously, where's my flying car?) and they asked us to do something: Imagine every computer that ever existed, literally, in your browser. And it was so. I have absolutely no affiliation with jscott, btw. Thought I should disclose that.
posted by jdaura on Oct 25, 2013 - 37 comments

The staircase you climb every day; the exact spot where you got engaged

Photographer and historian of the New York Press Photographers Association Marc Hermann searched the New York Daily News archive to find historic NYC crime scenes, and superimposed them on photographs of the same locations today. [more inside]
posted by cairdeas on Sep 15, 2013 - 8 comments

Five Feet of Books

"During his days as Harvard’s influential president, Dr. Charles W. Eliot made a frequent assertion: If you were to spend just 15 minutes a day reading the right books, a quantity that could fit on a five-foot shelf, you could give yourself a proper liberal education. Publisher P. F. Collier and Son loved the idea and asked Eliot to compile and edit the right collection of works. The result: a 51-volume series of classic works from world literature published in 1909 called Dr. Eliot’s Five Foot Shelf, which would later be called The Harvard Classics." (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 11, 2013 - 89 comments

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Illustrious Katie Sandwina

Strongwoman ("Almost nightly she bent iron bars, broke chains, supported enormous weights, including a 1,200-pound cannon on her shoulders..."), suffragette ("...she became vice-president of the suffrage group that formed within the Barnum & Bailey Circus in 1912"), wife ("But by his own account he recalled only entering the ring, a blue sky and being carried away from the ring by Kate like a prize"), mother ("... Sandwina had to crawl under barbed wire to get herself to a hospital. When she arrived, the hospital was full and she gave birth on the floor"), businesswoman ("After her retirement, Kate, Max and Ted opened a bar and grill in Queens, where the entire family performed on Saturday nights. Though advanced in age, Kate was still able to bend iron bars, lift heavy barbells and support her husband with an ease that showed she still possessed great strength"), and devastatingly charming interview subject ("And, besides, a man who is embracing a woman wants to hold a supple and warm body in his hands - not a lobster!"). Also: one of the subjects of the cutest marital photo of all time.
posted by julthumbscrew on Jun 7, 2013 - 13 comments

FOUND

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public."
posted by chunking express on Mar 11, 2013 - 15 comments

NYC Past

NYC Past Large-format historical photos of New York City.
posted by stavrosthewonderchicken on Mar 5, 2013 - 13 comments

candid photos of famous people

"Extremely silly" photos of: "extremely serious" artists - "extremely serious" writers - "extremely serious" historical figures. Also 14 photos that shatter your image of famous people. A few images might be considered slightly NSFW. [more inside]
posted by flex on Oct 29, 2012 - 65 comments

"Jumping the rope is not good exercise, for it jars the body too much"

Obsolessons: selected passages from the self-help and guide books of the past. [via mefi projects]
posted by The Whelk on Sep 14, 2012 - 17 comments

Hannibal and Subutai on saddle chaffing.

YOUR QUESTION: You have the ability to, for one night, reanimate any two historical personages (“historical” = “not currently alive”) and have them discuss/debate a topic of your own choosing. Which two historical personages do you choose, and what subject do you have them discuss/debate? (from MeFi's own Jscalzi)
posted by The Whelk on Aug 28, 2012 - 136 comments

Seoul before the war

Color pictures of Seoul, 1949.
posted by needled on May 23, 2012 - 11 comments

A psychopathology of unconscious gesture in search of a purpose

"The Secret Gestural Prehistory of Mobile Devices is cultural anthropology. It seeks to recover those moments of intuitive prehensile dexterity, when the famous and the ordinary alike felt the unconscious desire to occupy their hands for an as yet unknown purpose. Like Roy Neary's obsession with the image of Devil's Tower in Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), this gesture was vague, uncanny and compelling. It is the intimation in images of a gestural second nature to come." [more inside]
posted by taz on Mar 20, 2012 - 16 comments

The Victorian Kitchen Garden & a metric butt-ton of historical reconstruction series

The Victorian Kitchen Garden is a 13-part TV series that aired in 1987 on BBC2. It follows the month-by-month restoration of the Victorian walled kitchen garden at the Chilton Foliat estate in Wiltshire, England. Almost all the episodes are available to watch online. (via hark, a vagrant) It had three sequels - The Victorian Kitchen, The Victorian Flower Garden, and The Wartime Kitchen and Garden - and inspired more recent historical reconstruction programs: Tales From the Green Valley, A Tudor Feast at Christmas, Victorian Farm, Victorian Farm Christmas, Victorian Pharmacy, and Edwardian Farm. (Victorian Farm and Edwardian Farm previously.) [more inside]
posted by flex on Feb 26, 2012 - 29 comments

Theft of a "truly breathtaking" array of rare documents worth millions

Barry Landau, "America's Presidential Historian," collector, author, and expert on White House ephemera, and one Jason Savedoff, a Canadian golden boy who occasionally went by the name of J-Swing at my old stomping grounds, and who has assumed a number of aliases since, have been charged with "conspiring to steal historical documents from museums in Maryland and New York, and selling them for profit." Investigation has revealed further complications.
posted by Hyperbolus on Aug 6, 2011 - 24 comments

What did The Battle of Hastings smell like?

There's a growing movement to make sure that smells are incorporated into historical records. Historians, perfumers, and florists all want to make sure we can smell the past.
posted by rageagainsttherobots on Jul 24, 2011 - 36 comments

Africa: History, Cartography and Exploration

Evolution of the Map of Africa [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 7, 2011 - 15 comments

Historical timber finishes - no really.

A lot of people don't know where to go to source interesting info on historical wood finishes. You are not one of them. [more inside]
posted by bystander on Jun 2, 2011 - 10 comments

Old Pen

"The Old Idaho Penitentiary State Historical Site was a functioning prison for 101 years. It was built in 1870 and the first prisoners were brought in 1872. The buildings on the site were built by inmate laborers. The Old Idaho Penitentiary grew from a single cell house into a complex of several buildings holding Idaho's most notorious criminals. The Old Pen received over 13,000 inmates with a maximum population of 603 inmates. There were 222 women inmates (including repeat offenders.) Closed after riots in 1973, some say it's haunted.
posted by bwg on Mar 9, 2011 - 5 comments

Vintage Racing Bicycles.

Le blog de VelosVintage is a gorgeous French blog chock full of detailed photographs and history of beautiful vintage racing bicycles from older to newer.
posted by loquacious on Aug 18, 2010 - 10 comments

Affectionate Men

Bob Bragman has been collecting images of men being affectionate with each other for many years. Here is a small part of that collection posted on sfgate. Some are tender, some are awkward and some are from long ago.
posted by agatha_magatha on Aug 13, 2010 - 34 comments

Bully rocks:- impudent villians kept to preserve order in houses of ill fame

The Victorian Dictionary: A motley collection of primary source documents and reference materials about Victorian London by historical thriller author Lee Jackson. Read the 1841 Census, browse peroid advertisements, zoom in on the 1881 Pocket Guide to London or just learn some dirty words.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 19, 2010 - 17 comments

From Here to Then

SepiaTown lets you view and share thousands of mapped historical images from around the globe. [more inside]
posted by DU on Apr 8, 2010 - 4 comments

A "pictorial description of Broadway" in engravings

Broadway, block by block, 1899. (SLNYPL) "A 19th century version of Google's Street View, allowing us to flip through the images block by block, passing parks, churches, novelty stores, furriers, glaziers, and other businesses of the city's past."
posted by GrammarMoses on Feb 15, 2010 - 19 comments

Just the picture of health

This is an unoffical home for public domain photographs from the National Museum of Health & Medicine. View the stream, or visit its well-structuresd category catalog. [possibly NSFW in places] [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Jan 25, 2010 - 3 comments

The inadvertent poetry of the coroner's report

Coroner's reports 1896-1935 Monroe County, Indiana. Strange, spare and haunting. The economy of description here makes each death a condensed, mysterious story; it's an addictive glimpse into an America with different expectations of life and death reminiscent, to me, of Wisconsin Death Trip as seen on a previous thread.
posted by fullofragerie on Jan 19, 2010 - 110 comments

A Guide To Rivers, Plains, Planets, Stars

Peacay of BibliOdyessey highlights some stunning examples of Victorian Infographics from the Rumsey Map Collection(previously). (Direct Flickr link)
posted by The Whelk on Dec 22, 2009 - 21 comments

A Visit to the Pratt University Steam Plant

A Visit to the Pratt University Steam Plant. Antique electrical and mechanical. Brass, copper, iron, oak and stone. It smells of warm oil.
posted by jjray on Dec 8, 2009 - 29 comments

I thought I was the only one

“I think sometimes that being overly type-sensitive is like an allergy,” : The New York Times on the perils of being a font nerd.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 15, 2009 - 99 comments

Historical postcards from Opava, CZ

Historical postcards from Opava, CZ
posted by yegga on Jul 26, 2009 - 6 comments

California breaks off into the Pacific Ocean! Well, circa 1650.

It would take over 50 years after the creation of this map before it was confirmed that California is indeed attached to the mainland of America. 20 Fascinating Ancient Maps (via). More zoomable historical maps at the World Digital Library. (previously)
posted by desjardins on Jul 22, 2009 - 32 comments

Gimme That Old Time Derivation

The Cornell Historical Math Monographs archive has a great many famous papers, including works by De Morgan, Hamilton, Descartes (warning: French) and of course Lewis Carroll. [more inside]
posted by DU on Jun 15, 2009 - 7 comments

Everything Costs Something

What It Costs provides information on the costs associated with a wide variety of services and concepts. Whether you want to know the price range of practical activities — such as what it costs to replace a kitchen countertop, building a nuclear aircraft carrier — or are interested in unusual articles — such as the cost to build Fenway Park, being cryogenically frozen or cleaning up a murder scene — you will find all this and much more.
posted by netbros on Apr 9, 2009 - 24 comments

Hark, A Vagrant!

Kate Beaton, Historical Cartoonist
posted by flatluigi on Mar 13, 2009 - 70 comments

Other People's Pictures

You are interested in the unknown... the mysterious. The unexplainable. That is why you are here. And now, for the first time, we are bringing to you, the full story of what happened on that fateful day. We are bringing you all the evidence, based only on the secret testimony, of the miserable souls, who survived this terrifying ordeal. The incidents, the places. My friend, we cannot keep this a secret any longer. Let us punish the guilty. Let us reward the innocent. My friend, can your heart stand the shocking facts of a flickr collection of old snapshots?
posted by gamera on Feb 14, 2009 - 18 comments

Australian Newspapers, Digitised

The Australian National Library is digitising newspapers.
posted by Fiasco da Gama on Dec 16, 2008 - 13 comments

20 compelling photos from the Civil War.

20 photos from the Civil War via listverse
posted by lobstah on Nov 19, 2008 - 16 comments

Kilmer House

Kilmer House, the most engrossing corporate-based blog I've ever experienced, tells "The Story Behind Johnson & Johnson and Its People", from the days of the company's inception. Posts include strange products like silk and velvet Beauty Spots, a sherry-based cola drink, pain relievers laced with belladonna and kidney plasters; the difficulty marketing early feminine products to a prudish society; Doctor Dan the Bandage Man; why J & J is allowed to use the Red Cross on its packaging; and the iconic artistry behind the company's early ad campaigns.
posted by misha on Oct 7, 2008 - 9 comments

Hippies Bummed

For Sale: Max Yasgur's Farm [more inside]
posted by not_on_display on Jan 9, 2008 - 56 comments

get your ghoul on

Morbid Anatomy - an excellent blog with a focus on art, medicine, death, and culture. Great viewing anytime, but it might also be a good reference source for any macabre seasonal celebrations!
posted by madamjujujive on Oct 8, 2007 - 5 comments

Medical images - antiquities and curiosities

Historical medicine and health images - there's some fun browsing for aficionados of antique medical technologies, such as orthapedic devices, anatomical illustrations and models, public health materials, and much more. Each image can be enlarged and has explanatory text. (Just a small part of the 30,000+ image database of the wonderful site ingenious, previously brought to our attention by Fat Buddha.)
posted by madamjujujive on Aug 3, 2007 - 5 comments

Telephone Central Office / Exchange Name Histories

Telephone Central Office Histories - A fascinating collection of personal anecdotes and histories about telephony from the US and around the world, from The Telephone Exchange Name Project. Coral Cache links -1- -2- (via)
posted by loquacious on Jun 9, 2007 - 8 comments

They just don't make them like they used to (but you can).

Alternative Photography. How-tos and galleries of albumen prints, ambrotypes, tintypes (modern), (classic), temperaprint and many more. The article section is varied and includes instructions on making a cyanotype quilt and digital cyanotypes.
posted by Mitheral on Sep 28, 2006 - 5 comments

Freedom From Religion Pop Quiz

What Do You Know About The Separation of Church and State ? The Freedom From Religion Foundation has created this handy 21 question online multiple choice test. How good are your church/state separation Constitutional knowledge chops ? Could influential GOP member, Bush 2004 campaign consultant, and "America was founded as a Christian Nation" cheerleader David Barton pass ?
posted by troutfishing on Jan 27, 2006 - 70 comments

A Brief History of the Laughing Record

What's so funny?
posted by gilgamix on Aug 9, 2005 - 9 comments

New York Changing

New York Changing. Rephotographs from then and now.
posted by stbalbach on Nov 22, 2004 - 43 comments

Because digital pages don't turn yellow.

The National Endowment for the Arts and the Library of Congress are putting 30 million newspaper pages online. The National Digital Newspaper Program "will create a national, digital resource of historically significant newspapers from all the states and U.S. territories published between 1836 and 1922." The goal is to have it done in 20 years; the LOC has a sample up now: The Stars and Stripes from 1918-1919.
posted by me3dia on Nov 17, 2004 - 17 comments

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