Join 3,439 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

18 posts tagged with History by caddis.
Displaying 1 through 18 of 18.

Related tags:
+ (271)
+ (251)
+ (175)
+ (174)
+ (170)
+ (163)
+ (152)
+ (131)
+ (124)
+ (124)
+ (116)
+ (116)
+ (99)
+ (91)
+ (90)
+ (89)
+ (87)
+ (86)
+ (85)
+ (81)
+ (80)
+ (69)
+ (66)
+ (65)
+ (64)
+ (64)
+ (63)
+ (63)
+ (62)
+ (61)
+ (61)
+ (60)
+ (60)
+ (60)
+ (58)
+ (57)
+ (57)
+ (56)
+ (56)
+ (55)
+ (55)
+ (55)
+ (54)
+ (53)
+ (51)
+ (51)
+ (50)
+ (49)
+ (49)
+ (48)
+ (47)
+ (46)
+ (46)
+ (46)
+ (44)
+ (43)
+ (43)
+ (43)
+ (43)
+ (42)


Users that often use this tag:
zarq (115)
Miko (107)
homunculus (103)
Kattullus (99)
The Whelk (85)
plep (65)
anastasiav (53)
netbros (45)
nickyskye (43)
matteo (43)
Rumple (40)
infini (40)
carter (38)
Iridic (36)
brundlefly (34)
y2karl (33)
madamjujujive (32)
amyms (32)
MartinWisse (32)
filthy light thief (31)
Artw (29)
tellurian (28)
hama7 (27)
mediareport (26)
Chinese Jet Pilot (26)
marxchivist (25)
Trurl (24)
Abiezer (23)
taz (21)
nthdegx (21)
languagehat (21)
stbalbach (21)
kliuless (19)
Rhaomi (18)
caddis (18)
dhruva (18)
Mitheral (18)
Horace Rumpole (17)
loquacious (16)
jonson (16)
gman (15)
flapjax at midnite (14)
LarryC (14)
latkes (14)
Bora Horza Gobuchul (13)
unliteral (12)
reenum (12)
Blasdelb (12)
Joe Beese (12)
timshel (11)
Brandon Blatcher (11)
Ufez Jones (11)
Effigy2000 (11)
dersins (10)
OmieWise (10)
amberglow (10)
monju_bosatsu (10)
semmi (10)
absalom (9)
dng (9)

The most important battle you've probably never heard of

The Battle of Bouvines was fought 800 years ago on July 27, 1214 and its outcome directly led to the Magna Carta and also to the national identities of both England and France. Some historians claim this date should be remembered after the Battle of Hastings in 1066 as one of the defining moments in English history. King John attempted to retake lands in Normandy employing an alliance army including Otto of Germany. John attacked from the south, but more importantly Otto was decisively defeated at Bouvines. Humiliated in defeat John was forced to consent to the Magna Carta, and the Anglo-Norman realm came to a final end allowing both England and France to develop their separate national identities. More background.
posted by caddis on Jul 26, 2014 - 14 comments

Command decision

How Slavery Really Ended in America On May 23, 1861, little more than a month into the Civil War, three young black men rowed across the James River in Virginia and claimed asylum in a Union-held citadel.... [T]the laws of the United States were clear: all fugitives must be returned to their masters. The founding fathers enshrined this in the Constitution; Congress reinforced it in 1850 with the Fugitive Slave Act; and it was still the law of the land — including, as far as the federal government was concerned, within the so-called Confederate states. The war had done nothing to change it. Most important, noninterference with slavery was the very cornerstone of the Union’s war policy. President Abraham Lincoln had begun his inaugural address by making this clear, pointedly and repeatedly. “I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the states where it exists,” the president said. “I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.” [more inside]
posted by caddis on Apr 2, 2011 - 95 comments

Tenement Goose Farms

A story of moose snouts, tenement animal husbandry and Crisco - the Lower East Side.
RAZ: Now, you describe the markets in this part of the Lower East Side, around the Bowery that Mr. Glockner's wife would often go to to find fresh produce, I was amazed to read about what you could get in New York City in the 1860s. I mean, there were a lot of choices.
Ms. ZIEGELMAN: You could buy bear. You could buy moose. And not only moose, you could buy moose snout. This was considered a particular delicacy.
RAZ: By whom?
Ms. ZIEGELMAN: That I don't know.
[more inside]
posted by caddis on Jun 9, 2010 - 11 comments

America in the '30s

Kodachrome
They give us those nice bright colors
They give us the greens of summers
Makes you think all the world's a sunny day, Oh yeah
[another great find at Postroad's blog (NSFW)]
posted by caddis on May 19, 2010 - 21 comments

... --- ...

Happy 100th Birthday to SOS. “Send SOS,” one of the Titanic’s radio operators supposedly said to another after the famous ship struck that infamous iceberg. “It’s the new call and besides this may be your last chance to send it.” That “new call” is 100 years old today... (via the J-Walk blog)
posted by caddis on Jul 1, 2008 - 27 comments

Farm life in 1910

Farming with Dynamite Do stumps, clay or tired old soil have you down? Let "Red Cross" dynamite come to your rescue. (A blast from the past via ) [more inside]
posted by caddis on Jun 16, 2008 - 34 comments

I'm taking your horse Jesse James

In the Matter of Daniel Smoote v. Frank & Jesse James As bank robberies go, the 1869 heist pulled off by legendary outlaws Jesse and Frank James in Daviess County, Mo., wasn’t much of a success: They may have left with no money, they probably shot the wrong man, and Jesse James lost his horse. Perhaps even more frustrating for the outlaw duo, they ended up getting sued by a local farmer and his ambitious young lawyer—the first and only successful civil action against the former Confederate guerrillas-turned-outlaws. [more inside]
posted by caddis on Apr 28, 2008 - 8 comments

Illegal Eagles

It's war, and young American illegally men head to Canada. From Canada they are off to join the RAF and fight the Nazis in the Battle of Britain. The U.S. had passed a series of laws during the 1930’s to keep the country from getting embroiled in the growing turmoil in Europe and Asia.... The Neutrality Acts were structured to keep the U.S. out of a possible European war. This, in effect, made it illegal for recruiters to hire Americans to go to Canada or England for enlistment purposes, or for U.S. citizens to volunteer for military service in England.... Violators of the U. S. Neutrality Acts could face stiff penalties of up to $20,000 in fines, ten years in prison, and loss of citizenship. Some F.B.I. agents were assigned to track down these evildoers, but it doesn’t appear they had much success. They became the Eagle Squadrons. A similar group, the Flying Tigers, headed to China to fight the Japanese, this one apparently with some clandestine US government sponsorship, despite the neutrality laws. Brave, effective and colorful as described in this interview.
posted by caddis on Dec 9, 2006 - 16 comments

How to Speak 19th Century

Forgotten vocabulary. Words and phrases from an earlier era, the early Nineteenth century. Some slang too. (via the Presurfer)
posted by caddis on Aug 30, 2006 - 41 comments

This ain't no cat fight

Real women. The gladiator - epitome of male combat, well, not always male. The gladiatrix (mNSFW) is no myth. The evidence exists.
posted by caddis on Aug 6, 2006 - 14 comments

Deadball

We all have to go sometime. Frank Russo has an obsession, dead ballplayers. Some died in accidents, some were murdered, some couldn't take it anymore, and some were cursed. They were all human. (via HNT)
posted by caddis on Jul 9, 2006 - 14 comments

I challenge you to a duel

Abraham Lincoln, duelist? Hamilton and Burr were not the only prominent duelists in US history. In the early morning hours of September 22, 1842, a young Abraham Lincoln crossed the Mississippi River at Alton, IL on his way to a small island where he would engage in mortal combat with a political adversary. Lincoln had used his sarcastic wit to write anonymous letters to the editor lampooning a political rival, James Shields. Some of his friends joined in and perhaps went a little too far, including suggestions of Shields' inadequacies with the ladies. One of these friends included Lincoln's future wife, Mary Todd. Shields demanded a duel and Lincoln defined the parameters of the duel - broadswords in a pit.
posted by caddis on Apr 24, 2006 - 46 comments

Stop squinting

Antique Spectacles David Fleishman, M.D., a retired ophthalmologist, has compiled a rather extensive collection of information about spectacles and their importance in history. In addition to many examples of early spectacles and information about the spectacles worn by figures in history, there is a general history - Eyeglasses Through the Ages:[R]eading glasses are one of the most important inventions of the past 2000 years.... No one really knows about the early history of image magnification. In ancient times, someone noticed that convex-shaped glass magnified images. Sometime between the year 1000 and 1250 crude technology began to develop regarding reading stones (simple magnifiers). English Franciscan Friar Roger Bacon (1220 -1292), in his 1268 ‘Opus Majus’, noted that letters could be seen better and larger when viewed through less than half a sphere of glass. Bacon's experiments confirmed the principle of the convex (converging) lens, described by Alhazen (965-1038) Arabian mathematician, optician and astronomer at Cairo, and even earlier by the Greeks. (via the dead tree version of the WSJ)
posted by caddis on Apr 6, 2006 - 18 comments

In your cups

A vessel to fill with mirth. Drinking vessels from days of yore, including Lord Byron's skull cup, a fuddling cup, a black jack (leather cup), a pot crown ( a precursor to the beer helmet?), and a whistle cup. The site contains lots of other wine history as well. Ah, but they didn't have lover's cups back then. (via Cynical-C)
posted by caddis on Mar 24, 2006 - 5 comments

In the year 8113

An ambitious time capsule. In the basement of Phoebe Hearst Hall at Oglethorpe University in Georgia, there is a stainless steel vault door which was welded shut over sixty five years ago. Behind this door lies a 20' x 10' waterproofed room containing a menagerie of once-modern artifacts and microfilm records, placed there by men and women in the years between 1937 and 1940. If their goal is realized, the contents of this vault will remain unseen and undisturbed for the next 6,107 years. Official site, pictures, and inventory. (link lovingly pilfered from another filter)
posted by caddis on Feb 23, 2006 - 42 comments

Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing

Motown history traded for Super Bowl parking. (mostly audio) The Motown Center in Detroit was torn down a few weeks ago and turned into Super Bowl parking. Although not the main recording studios, and long abandoned, it still contained many Motown documents and memorabilia, most of which were lost in the razing. Covered by local bloggers: dETROITfUNK (1, 2) , Detroit Blog (1, 2, 3, 4), and Kempa, plus local tv.
posted by caddis on Feb 6, 2006 - 45 comments

The New Whigs

Is the modern GOP a repackaging of the old Whig party? (archive link) The blend of businessmen's aversion to government regulation, down-home cultural populism and Christian moralism that sustains today's Republican Party is a venerable if loosely knit philosophy of government dating back to long before the right-wing upsurge that prepared the way for Reagan's presidency. A few pundits and political insiders have likened the current Republicans to the formidable, corporate-financed political machine behind President William McKinley at the end of the 19th century. The admiration Karl Rove has expressed for the machine strengthens the historical connection. Of course, the Whigs couldn't hold their disparate coalition together in the face of the slavery issue. What might undo the current disparate coalition in the GOP?
posted by caddis on Oct 16, 2005 - 29 comments

Six Drinks that Changed the World

Six Drinks that Changed the World. Beer, Wine, Coffee . . . Their impact upon the history of the World. via GeekPress
posted by caddis on Oct 9, 2005 - 50 comments

Page: 1