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53 posts tagged with History by anastasiav.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 53.

The Lion of the Union is No More

One hundred years ago today, General Joshua L. Chamberlain - the "lion of the union" - linguist, professor, mason, soldier, Medal of Honor winner, public servant, and author -- died at the age of 85, from the lingering wounds he had suffered at the Siege of Petersburg, fifty years earlier.
posted by anastasiav on Feb 24, 2014 - 12 comments

'A slice of bread seems an unimportant thing.....'

Foods That Will Win The War (and how to cook them)
posted by anastasiav on Mar 4, 2010 - 39 comments

You can't begin to tell the story....

Life Before Your Eyes
posted by anastasiav on Jan 14, 2010 - 21 comments

'Favorite dolls may fade with time - our love for them never will.'

Doll Kind :: Dolls of the 20th Century - A Celebration in Pictures and Histories
posted by anastasiav on Nov 16, 2009 - 20 comments

They are fighting for a new world of freedom and peace.

Toons at War [more inside]
posted by anastasiav on Dec 9, 2008 - 5 comments

'Where Forgotton Books are Remembered'

The Neglected Books Page
posted by anastasiav on Dec 5, 2008 - 13 comments

How do you do! I am the little book that you have made.

Book of Short Stories :: Short stories written by New York State 5th graders in 1931. (Be sure to read the About page to get a sense of the setting of the times.) (via Thingamababy)
posted by anastasiav on Sep 22, 2008 - 20 comments

Magnificent Obsessions # 5,184

The Pram Museum
posted by anastasiav on Jul 18, 2008 - 13 comments

'People are machines of forgetfulness'

The Heritage of the Great War
posted by anastasiav on May 8, 2008 - 8 comments

'Radioactive mama, we'll reach critical mass tonight'

Atomic Platters :: Cold War Music from the Golden Age of Homeland Security
posted by anastasiav on Feb 15, 2008 - 5 comments

witness the strangest customs of the red, white, brown, black and yellow races ... attend their startling rites, their mysterious practices ... all assembled for you

The Secret Museum of Mankind :: "Published in 1935, the Secret Museum is a mystery book. It has no author or credits, no copyright, no date, no page numbers, no index ... The tone of the commentary is dated, and uniformly racist in the extreme, often hilariously so. It reads like the patter of a carnival sideshow barker, from a time when the world was divided between "modern" Europeans and "savages" ... Presented here is the Secret Museum in its entirety, all 564 pages scanned and transcribed-- nothing is omitted or censored ... Treat it as entertainment instead of education (don't take it seriously and don't believe a word it says!), adjust for the blatant racial bias of the time, and enjoy."
posted by anastasiav on Feb 14, 2008 - 67 comments

'It Speaks for Itself'

British Movietone News - Digital Archives :: Apparently complete archives of the UK Movietone Newsreels from 1929 - 1979. Free registration required. Uses Quicktime. Beware of many lost hours ahead. Via DaddyTypes
posted by anastasiav on Feb 12, 2008 - 15 comments

The Flatter the Landscape the Flatter the Accent

How The Edwardians Spoke :: BBC documentary via Google Video, about an hour [more inside]
posted by anastasiav on Oct 19, 2007 - 23 comments

I have always thought that there is no more fruitful source of family discontent than a housewife’s badly-cooked dinners and untidy ways.

Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management
posted by anastasiav on Sep 18, 2007 - 41 comments

A vision of persistence of vision

The History of The Discovery of Cinematography
posted by anastasiav on Aug 23, 2007 - 7 comments

Rationalize rhetoric and it speaks to your mind; personify her and she speaks to your soul

American Rhetoric :: an online archive
posted by anastasiav on Aug 22, 2007 - 14 comments

"…the eye is not satisfied with seeing…"

Aerial Archaeology in Northern France
posted by anastasiav on Aug 17, 2007 - 13 comments

The Mystery of Ales

The Mystery of Ales :: a new take on the Alger Hiss problem
posted by anastasiav on Jul 19, 2007 - 11 comments

'The story is dark enough, drawn from the plain public records, to send a chill to any heart.'

How the Other Half Lives :: Studies Among the Tenements of New York (1890)
posted by anastasiav on Jun 1, 2007 - 14 comments

The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, and more...

The Internet Library of Early Journals :: A digital library of 18th and 19th Century journals
posted by anastasiav on May 31, 2007 - 23 comments

Every picture tells a story....

The Evolution of Modern Speech balloons (in painting and caricature). One small part of Andy's Early Comics Archive.
posted by anastasiav on May 18, 2007 - 10 comments

'To an Eastern man this city is full of surprises. '

Ghost Cowboy :: True Tales of Adventure in the American West
posted by anastasiav on Feb 3, 2007 - 10 comments

Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives:

State of the Union Addresses 1790-2006 :: complete texts
posted by anastasiav on Jan 3, 2007 - 18 comments

'That is all very well, but who is to bell the Cat?'

Aesopica: Aesop's Fables in English, Latin & Greek
posted by anastasiav on Oct 25, 2006 - 17 comments

'What words say does not last. The words last. Because words are always the same, and what they say is never the same.'

The Phrontistery presents A Compendium of Lost Words
posted by anastasiav on Jul 1, 2006 - 14 comments

"As much of life that the world can show"

The Illustrated London News :: an archive
posted by anastasiav on Apr 27, 2006 - 4 comments

In the olden days, before 1984, not very many people used computers....

Apple Computer 1984 Newsweek Advertising Insert :: a complete scan of Apple's 16-page advertising insert in Newsweek magazine, introducing the new and revolutionary Macintosh computer.
posted by anastasiav on Apr 26, 2006 - 55 comments

'The search for the perfect suit continues...'

Space Suits
posted by anastasiav on Jan 9, 2006 - 18 comments

Happy Birthday, Metafilter!

Cat-Scan.com is one of the strangest sites I've seen in some time. I have no idea how these people got their cats wedged into their scanners, or why.
posted by anastasiav on Jul 13, 2005 - 121 comments

Bolos, Ascots, Bandannas, The Steinkirk, Cravats, and Shih Huang Ti

Neckties Through The Ages
posted by anastasiav on May 10, 2005 - 10 comments

Your great-great-grandmother didn't have to surrender her children. What happened?

The Underground History of American Education
You aren't compelled to loan your car to anyone who wants it, but you are compelled to surrender your school-age child to strangers who process children for a livelihood.... If I demanded you give up your television to an anonymous, itinerant repairman who needed work you'd think I was crazy; if I came with a policeman who forced you to pay that repairman even after he broke your set, you would be outraged. Why are you so docile when you give up your child to a government agent called a schoolteacher?
posted by anastasiav on Apr 1, 2005 - 95 comments

The Lost Worlds of the Romanovs

The Lost Worlds of the Romanovs
posted by anastasiav on Mar 24, 2005 - 5 comments

The Trial of John Dicks, and other True Stories

Homosexuality in 18th Century England :: an amazing compilation of primary source material from newspaper reports and other sources.
posted by anastasiav on Mar 3, 2005 - 13 comments

Crime, politics, romance, emigration, humour, tragedy, royalty and superstitions

The Word on the Street :: A collection of over 1800 broadsides published in Scotland between 1650 and 1910, featuring both digital images of the original Broadsides as well as transcriptons of the texts. You can just review the highlights or search or browse the entire collection.
posted by anastasiav on Feb 20, 2005 - 13 comments

Fringe Archaeology

A Skeptics View of Fringe Archaeology
posted by anastasiav on Feb 10, 2005 - 10 comments

Self-defence with a Walking-stick

Self-defence with a Walking-stick : The Different Methods of Defending Oneself with a Walking-Stick or Umbrella when Attacked under Unequal Conditions (Part I) (with pictures!) :: via The Journal of Non-Lethal combatives ::
posted by anastasiav on Jan 28, 2005 - 20 comments

Everything Old is Cool Again

Vintage Technology :: I like the bric a brac best.
posted by anastasiav on Jan 7, 2005 - 2 comments

Avast, ye scurvy dogs! Or something.

naval-history.net :: yet another fine example of how the web can help one man or woman with a true passion for a subject go from a hobbist to a published expert. Be sure to read the dedication to his dad at the top of the page.
posted by anastasiav on Jul 16, 2004 - 1 comment

See the USA in your CHEVROLET

The Old Car Manual Project
posted by anastasiav on Jun 1, 2004 - 5 comments

Avoid such old-fashioned, time-wasting answers as

How To Make Friends By Telephone :: a useful how-to book from the 1940's
posted by anastasiav on May 27, 2004 - 22 comments

Famous Unsolved Codes and Ciphers

Famous Unsolved Codes and Ciphers
posted by anastasiav on May 18, 2004 - 13 comments

Office Supply Geeks Unite!

The Early Office Museum :: check out communications technologies used by our Grandparents, as well as Punched Card Tabulating Machines and much, much more!
posted by anastasiav on Mar 3, 2004 - 10 comments

The only problem was that there was two women for every man.

50's Women and Their World
:: via blort and Madamjjj ::
posted by anastasiav on Jan 21, 2004 - 25 comments

The History of Eating Utensils

The History of Eating Utensils
posted by anastasiav on Dec 6, 2003 - 8 comments

If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

Propaganda Postcards From World War I
posted by anastasiav on Nov 18, 2003 - 3 comments

A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know. -- Diane Arbus

Anima: A fascinating archive of the ways early photography was used to give the illusion of motion, as well as information on the evolution of optical toys and early cinema.
posted by anastasiav on Nov 8, 2003 - 5 comments

What a romance my life has been! -- Napoleon Bonaparte

On October 17, 1815, following The 100 Days and Waterloo, Napoleon Bonaparte arrived on the Island of St Helena, where he would remain until his death (mysterious or otherwise) in 1821. Discovered by the Portuguese in 1502, St Helena had a long and interesting history before Napoleon arrived, but that history was overshadowed by the story of the Emperor's last years, living in captive exile at the simple yet beautiful Longwood House. Victorians had an insatiable interest for information about the remote island. Today, the picturesque Island is a a tiny bit of England in the South Atlantic, where coffee and tourism (indeed, what some might call pilgrimages) are the main sources of income.
posted by anastasiav on Oct 17, 2003 - 3 comments

He kept the West in food and wives. -- Will Rogers

The story of Fred Harvey and the Harvey Girls is the story of the civilization of the American West. From 1896 to 1945, Harvey House Restaurants and Hotels along the route of the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe represented first-rate food served in clean, stylish surroundings at reasonable cost. His corps of well-trained waitresses, wearing their distinctive uniforms and bound by a code of hard work and good conduct, provided both adventure and independence to generations of young women. Today, all that is left of the Harvey empire is the remembrances of former employees, beautiful buildings which dot the southwest, some vintage recipes, a 1946 Judy Garland film, and (possibly) the enduring term "Blue-Plate Special".
posted by anastasiav on Oct 1, 2003 - 8 comments

And the leper in whom the plague is, his clothes shall be rent, and the hair of his head shall go loose, and he shall cover his upper lip, and shall cry, unclean, unclean

The locals simply called it Carville. Known more formally as the The Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease Center, it was transformed in July 2000 into The National Hansen's Disease Museum. What is Hansen's Disease? You may know it better by its biblical name - Leprosy. From the founding of the National Leprosarium in 1917 until the hospital closed in 1998, The stories of the people of Carville, their isolation, and finally their fight for civil rights combine to make one of the most important stories in American public health history.
posted by anastasiav on Sep 7, 2003 - 15 comments

Duck and Cover!

In the house where I grew up, we had a 1950's-era Bomb Shelter in the backyard (a cold war relic inherited from the previous owner). We used our shelter as a playground, but many are now forgotten, repurposed, or restored as museum exhibits. Although such shelters are still for sale (often marketed as Tornado or Storm Shelters), many people today regard these shelters as relics from an earlier time. For some, however, the current terror alerts are reviving cold war shelter memories. As demonstrated by sites like the excellent civildefensemuseum.com, we are clearly still fascinated with this important and revealing part of our history.
posted by anastasiav on Feb 25, 2003 - 7 comments

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