4371 posts tagged with History.
Displaying 101 through 150 of 4371. Subscribe:

Oh my God, shoes.

Shoes - ten years ago Liam Kyle Sullivan created "Shoes", one of the first viral hits of the YouTube era featuring his Midwestern teen girl character Kelly. Now he sits down with Vice to talk about YouTube fame, touring, how it came about, and what came after.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 16, 2016 - 31 comments

No pokey

A short history of the thimbles one might find in the English countryside. Also crotal bells and Gunter's chain markings. [more inside]
posted by Mitheral on Apr 15, 2016 - 11 comments

"Clark's Place"

How does a TV show go from an idea to something you can watch ? Caroline Framke spent six months following the production of an episode of FX's critically lauded spy drama 'The Americans' to find out.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 14, 2016 - 30 comments

How to Read a Neighborhood

Dating Historic Images A key to using clues in photos to narrow down the date of construction for historic vernacular architecture, from University of Vermont's Landscape Change digital image project. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Apr 13, 2016 - 11 comments

Baltimore and Baltimore-A Tale of Two Cities

“That’s the thing, though,” he continues. “All that is surrounded by vacant lots, boarded-up homes, and that junkyard—the scrap metal and salvage place where there’s always a line of people hauling stuff in. Down the street from Jubilee Arts, where those little girls do ballet in their pink leotards, I saw a metal coffin once being scrapped for cash.” Nell pauses. “But that’s the way Baltimore has always been",he says. “It’s what a good friend of mine who is no longer around used to say: ‘In Baltimore, beauty and chaos live side by side.’”
posted by josher71 on Apr 12, 2016 - 6 comments

Buried Ideas

‘For over two millennia,’ Ian Johnson writes, ‘all our knowledge of China’s great philosophical schools was limited to texts revised after the Qin unification.’ Now a trove of recently discovered ancient documents, written on strips of bamboo, ‘is helping to reshape our understanding of China’s contentious past.’ [more inside]
posted by schneckinlittle on Apr 11, 2016 - 13 comments

So, *that's* why we have 4-H.

Fetishizing Family Farms Broken families, underground vice, and sexual variance - not stability - characterized the American family farm for most of its history, argues historian Gabriel Rosenberg. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Apr 10, 2016 - 88 comments

Inside America’s Auschwitz

Smithsonian Magazine looks at the Whitney Plantation, the first slave museum in the United States.
“Often, plantation exhibits were established for those who lived through the Civil Rights era and yearned for a less complicated time,” says Ashley Rogers, director of museum operations. “And that’s an easy thing to accomplish when you have a ‘chandelier’ tour. Where the previous focus at plantations has been on the house and the culture of Southern gentility, things are changing.”
posted by frimble on Apr 9, 2016 - 41 comments

The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary

The mysterious and useful Vegetable Lamb of Tartary: a plant whose ripe seed-pods yield tiny live lambs. Or was it a plant growing in the shape of a full-size lamb, but with an umbilical tether to the ground? (Oh, and do you know about the barnacle goose?) A tale from the medieval science grapevine. [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Apr 8, 2016 - 7 comments

Look for Periwinkle Patches.

The Burial Database of Enslaved African Americans is a project of the Periwinkle Initiative to identify and document often-unmarked cemeteries where the remains of enslaved people are interred. Now "in its infancy," it will aggregate submissions nationwide. People who know of a site can submit it online - an important task given that many are threatened by development and identified by local lore and memory alone.
posted by Miko on Apr 8, 2016 - 6 comments

How to Write a History of Video Game Warfare

How to Write a History of Video Game Warfare - A look at journalist Andrew Groen's new book, Empires of Eve, a detailed history of The Great War in Eve Online, a MMORPG of spaceships, star systems, intrigue, betrayal, and diplomacy.

And for a more academic look at the game, Internet Spaceships Are Serious Business, also recently published. (Link for those with university Shibboleth access)
posted by Argyle on Apr 6, 2016 - 12 comments

What is an "average" Rembrandt?

The Next Rembrandt Can you create a "new" Rembrandt "painting" via data analysis? This project gives it a try.
posted by xingcat on Apr 5, 2016 - 27 comments

Practical Magic

Edward Lovett was a bank employee and amateur folklorist fascinated with charms and amulets and the superstitions they represented. He rambled early 20th century London collecting charms from soldiers, sailors, street vendors and others. Today the charms are preserved in the Wellcome Collection, Pitt Rivers Museum, and Horniman Museum. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Apr 2, 2016 - 2 comments

Is that a gun in your spacesuit?

The Ultimate List of Weapons Astronauts Have Carried Into Orbit
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Apr 2, 2016 - 44 comments

Delmer Berg, Last U.S. Survivor of the Spanish Civil War, Dead at 100

The Death of the Last Veteran of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. "Delmer Berg, 100, was one of the Americans who volunteered to fight Francisco Franco in the Spanish Civil War, and he never stopped fighting for leftist causes." Berg died on February 28, 2016. The war ended 77 years ago today. [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Apr 1, 2016 - 26 comments

Being An Ambassador To An Anti-Gay Country When You’re A Lesbian

Never before has a British ambassador given an interview about being lesbian or gay [...] this is the first full discussion with a member of the press about life as an out-and-proud ambassador. It has taken 25 years for this to even be conceivable – and it isn’t until the end of the interview that the real reason for Gough’s anxiousness emerges.
posted by moody cow on Apr 1, 2016 - 10 comments

How to Hack an Election

"For eight years, Sepúlveda, now 31, says he traveled the continent rigging major political campaigns... Many of Sepúlveda’s efforts were unsuccessful, but he has enough wins that he might be able to claim as much influence over the political direction of modern Latin America as anyone in the 21st century."
posted by cudzoo on Mar 31, 2016 - 16 comments

"Draw a picture of a whale"

Mark Twain reveals his surefire method for memorizing the reigns of the English monarchs. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Mar 31, 2016 - 10 comments

“Soul food is in the marrow of our bones...”

The State of Soul Food in America: Exploring the Past, Present, and Future by Adrian Miller [First We Feast] What does soul food mean in 2016? A roundtable of experts discusses the emerging movements and obstacles the cuisine faces. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 30, 2016 - 5 comments

The Emergency Egress

Balcony Seats to the City: "Officially of course, the urban fire escape is primarily an emergency exit, but in New York, this prosaic adornment of countless five- and six-story apartment houses has assumed myriad other functions: faux backyards, platforms for criminal getaways, oases for marginalized smokers and makeshift bedrooms popular during an age before air-conditioning." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 29, 2016 - 23 comments

Canny political players, not pawns or victims

Writing women characters into epic fantasy without quotas, an essay by SFF writer Kate Elliott. [more inside]
posted by suelac on Mar 25, 2016 - 32 comments

An awful lyre

The seal was a remarkable find, bearing the name of an unknown princess and the only depiction of an ancient Israelite harp. Good enough to be depicted on Israeli coinage? Almost too good... The Trouble With the Maadana [more inside]
posted by Joe in Australia on Mar 25, 2016 - 8 comments

The Harvard Library That Protects The World's Rarest Colors

The most unusual colors from Harvard's storied pigment library include beetle extracts, poisonous metals, and human mummies
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Mar 24, 2016 - 18 comments

A Private Little War

Between 1975 and 1977, Paramount and Gene Roddenberry planned to make a Star Trek movie, but it turned out to be anything but easy. What would it be about? Plot ideas included time travel, snake people, God, black holes and the titans of ancient Greek mythology. Writer after writer took a turn at coming up with a story, leaving behind a string of rejected screenplays. In March 1978, Paramount president Michael Eisner announced a film spin-off. The race to make Star Trek: The Motion Picture was on. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 23, 2016 - 96 comments

Baltimore: The Third Rail

"Three weeks later, his administration released a revealing map showing how the money for road upgrades would be allocated around the state. Not only did the governor’s map show no money for Baltimore City. It did not show the city at all. By some Freudian slip, the city of 620,000 people had mistakenly been swallowed up by the Chesapeake Bay. Disappeared."
posted by josher71 on Mar 21, 2016 - 33 comments

Can I Toast Whole Wheat in That?

From July 2007 to April 2013, Arstechnica writer Jeremy Reimer wrote a series of articles covering the History of the Amiga. Now almost 3 years later, part 9 has been released. It covers the game changing (pun not intended but this is the Amiga) Video Toaster.
posted by juiceCake on Mar 18, 2016 - 38 comments

Rule 303

Harry "Breaker" Morant, Lieutenant in the Bushveldt Carbineers, in 1902 was convicted by court-martial of the killing of prisoners in present-day South Africa during the Boer War. He was executed by firing squad and his story was memorialized in the film bearing his name. More than a century later, Australian lawyer Jim Unkles is fighting to clear his name. But should he be pardoned? [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 15, 2016 - 13 comments

The history of the Novaya Zemlya effect, a polar mirage

In 1596, Willem Barentsz and his crew went searching for the Northeast passage for a third time. It did not go well, and the crew was forced to spend a winter on Novaya Zemlya. On November 3 they saw the sun go down, and did not expect to see it again until February 8. However on January 24, 1597, three of the crew caught a glimpse of the sun. Three days later, Barents himself saw the sun, "in its full roundness, just free of the horizon." They had witnessed what would be know as the the Novaya Zemlya effect (YouTube of such an event; PDF with history and details). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 15, 2016 - 18 comments

Dorothy on Adolf

In 1931, journalist Dorothy Thompson interviewed Adolph Hitler, asking "Will Adolf Hitler come to power? And if he does--will it make any difference?" [PDF] and concluding that " If Hitler comes into power, he will smite only the weakest of his enemies. But perhaps the drummer boy has let loose forces stronger then he knows." Ten years later, after she became the first American journalist expelled from Nazi Germany and her prediction had proved rather spectacularly wrong, she asked "Who Goes Nazi?" [more inside]
posted by sallybrown on Mar 12, 2016 - 54 comments

No wool, no vikings

The fleece that launched 1,000 ships.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 9, 2016 - 17 comments

The Southern Strategy and the devil down south.

"Goldwater discovered it; Nixon refined it; and Reagan perfected it into the darkest of the modern political dark arts." An excellent piece on the history of the Republican party’s racial politics since the Civil Rights Movement era, and how the 'Southern Strategy' and its dog-whistle appeal to racism paved the way for the current unpleasantness within the Grand Old Party. [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Mar 7, 2016 - 131 comments

↑↑↓↓←→←→BA

The Forgotten Politics Behind Contra's Name by Matt Morey [Kill Screen]
Do a quick Google search of “contra.” Browsing the first few pages, you should see a saturation of links about the videogame—the now-primary version of the word—sprinkled with other definitions. Next in the deck is contra as preposition: “against, contrary, or opposed to,” suitingly enough. Then, a “contemporary New York cuisine” restaurant; contra-dancing, a folksy flirty form adaptable to many musical styles; the second album by Vampire Weekend; and eventually, peeking through before being closed out again, you’ll stumble upon the elephant in the room.
posted by Fizz on Mar 7, 2016 - 69 comments

What's changed and changing about (American) politics?

The three party system - "There are three major political forces in contemporary politics in developed countries: tribalism, neoliberalism and leftism (defined in more detail below). Until recently, the party system involved competition between different versions of neoliberalism. Since the Global Financial Crisis, neoliberals have remained in power almost everywhere, but can no longer command the electoral support needed to marginalise both tribalists and leftists at the same time. So, we are seeing the emergence of a three-party system, which is inherently unstable because of the Condorcet problem and for other reasons." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Mar 4, 2016 - 77 comments

The dental drill predates the wheel -- but was it safe?

Despite our rapidly advanced dental technology, the idea of dental drilling still scares many of us today. Now imagine your teeth being drilled by Neolithic tools and our ancestors suddenly appear a great deal braver than us. They must have known the true fear of a trip to the dentist.
For BBC Earth, Colin Barras investigates the evidence for the existence of dentistry in prehistoric times.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 3, 2016 - 20 comments

“They just added an extra five days of festivals, of partying...”

The Surprising History Behind Leap Year by Brian Handwerk [National Geographic]
The ancient Egyptians did it, and so do we. Here's how a leap day—which occurs Februrary 29—helps keep our calendars and societies in sync. It's that time again: This Monday, February 29, is a leap day, the calendar oddity that occurs (almost) every four years. For centuries, trying to sync calendars with the length of the natural year caused confusion—until the concept of leap year provided a way to make up for lost time.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Feb 29, 2016 - 39 comments

Grace's Guide to British Industrial History

Grace's Guide to British Industrial History ‘is a free-content not-for-profit project dedicated to publishing the history of industry in the UK and elsewhere. Its aim is to provide a brief history of the companies, products and people who were instrumental in industry, commencing with the birth of the Industrial Revolution and continuing up to recent times.’ It ‘contains 115,164 pages of information and 163,140 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.’ Browse by Archived Publications, Biographies (‘over 35,000 pages of biographical notes on individuals’), Industries, Locations or Timelines. There is also a blog.
posted by misteraitch on Feb 29, 2016 - 5 comments

"Being Iceland, it gets complicated."

Saga Thing is a podcast [iTunes link] about the Sagas of the Icelanders by Professors Andrew Pfrenger and John P. Sexton. The format is simple, the two of them discuss a single saga over the course of one or more episodes. Then they render judgment at the end, on such issues as the quality of its nicknames, witticisms, characters and bloodshed. If you need a refresher on the medieval literature and history of Iceland, Saga Thing has you covered with three introductory episodes (1, 2, 3), or you could listen to the BBC's In Our Time episode about the sagas. Andy and John also have a few short episodes on related topics, such as the gruesome blood eagle, dueling and Norse remains in Newfoundland.
posted by Kattullus on Feb 28, 2016 - 16 comments

Roadtrip like it's 1966

Every year for the last 50+ years the BC Ministry of Transportation has had a instrumented truck drive every mile of every highway in the province to record highway conditions. Part of the instrumentation is millions of pictures (one every 10-30 metres). The Ministry has compiled selected sets of those pictures from 1966 into video photolog trips of selected highways. Highway 1 from Lytton to Revelstoke; The Island's Malahat; Highway 99 from Horseshoe Bay to Squamish; [more inside]
posted by Mitheral on Feb 28, 2016 - 17 comments

Yellow Eggplants, White Carrots, Seeds Everywhere

What did common fruits and vegetables look like before domestication? [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Feb 27, 2016 - 26 comments

"NASA and the space" is not a buddy movie

"The Evolution Of Webdesign is a collection and imitation of Webdesign Trends from 1991 to 2015." with a slider. and Neil Armstrong.
posted by oneswellfoop on Feb 27, 2016 - 13 comments

Silver, metal, liquid, blue

Y2K Futurism - An investigation into the futurism/aesthetic of the period 1996-02 (SLImgur)
posted by timshel on Feb 26, 2016 - 45 comments

Finance, old wood, and flame

How do you make a secure record of a debt or exchange if you can't read or write? Cut a number of notches across a stick to symbolize the assets involved, then split the wood lengthwise: you now have two tamper-proof receipts, one for each party to the transaction. The split tally method formed the basis for much of European bookkeeping between medieval times and the modern era. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Feb 25, 2016 - 20 comments

The Unknown 17

Jesse Owens usually gets all the attention when people talk about the 1936 Summer Olympic Games, but the documentary Olympic Pride, American Prejudice looks at the other black athletes who traveled with Owens to Hitler’s Berlin 80 years ago, including Jackie Robinson’s big brother Mack, and Tidye Ann Pickett-Phillips, first black American woman to compete in the Olympics.
posted by LeLiLo on Feb 24, 2016 - 7 comments

"Coolie Women Are in Demand Here"

I was made to recite the story of my greatgrandmother, to the extent that I knew it: Her name was Sujaria, and this was her village. The British took her away in 1903 to work their sugar plantations in a place now known as Guyana. She sailed on a ship called The Clyde. My grandfather was born on that ship.
Gaiutra Bahadur traces the story of her great grandmother's singular journey as indentured labour meant for the sugar plantations of the Caribbean, shedding light on the lives of women in British India over a hundred years ago.
posted by infini on Feb 23, 2016 - 11 comments

"Single Women Are Our Most Potent Political Force"

Almost a quarter of the votes in the last US presidential election were cast by women without spouses, up three points from just four years earlier. They are almost 40% of the African-American population, close to 30% of the Latino population, and about a third of all young voters. The most powerful voter this year is The Single American Woman.
posted by zarq on Feb 22, 2016 - 53 comments

They shall not pass.

One hundred years ago today began the terrible battle of Verdun. The German strategy called not so much for territorial conquest as for simply killing as many Frenchmen as possible, to "bleed France white". The name of the plan was Operation Gericht, as in judgement or, grimmer still, the place of execution. Up to nearly one million casualties resulted.

The battle was the most bloody and destructive of World War One up until that point. It would last for the rest of 1916, continuous fighting lasting for more than 300 days. [more inside]
posted by doctornemo on Feb 21, 2016 - 48 comments

Espionage Techniques of Seventeenth-Century Women

While Dr. Nadine Akkerman of Leiden University was examining letters sent by Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia (Google books preview) during her exile in the Hague, she discovered that some were filled with secret codes.... Akkerman was intrigued as to why the queen would require such covert correspondence. This was her first encounter with the 17th-century female spy.
Within England, Dr. Akkerman uncovered a network of more than sixty female spies. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 16, 2016 - 11 comments

Our Nimble Lass

Back in March, a few of us here at the magazine got e-mails from friends who had seen an intriguing item listed on eBay. “1930s stripper/dancer scrapbook—Cincinnati,” the posting announced, “Jean Harlow’s double.” So we bought it. But who was she? [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 14, 2016 - 6 comments

A Collection of Negro League Documentaries

A variety of documentaries about Negro League baseball: Only The Ball Was White, Black Ball, Extra Innings: Preserving the History of the Negro Leagues, and The Long Summers of Lou Dials. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 10, 2016 - 4 comments

Folding and securing paper to function as its own enclosure

‘Letterlocking refers to the folding and securing of any writing surface (such as papyrus, parchment, and paper) to function as its own enclosure.’ In their YouTube channel, Jana Dambrogio of MIT Libraries and her colleagues demonstrate a number of letterlocking techniques, from a simple method used by Russian soldiers in WWII, to more elaborate and ‘secure’ schemes employed by the likes of John Donne, Constanijn Huygens, Elizabeth Stuart and Queen Elizabeth I. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Feb 10, 2016 - 18 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 88