Join 3,512 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

3692 posts tagged with History. (View popular tags)
Displaying 3051 through 3100 of 3692. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (272)
+ (251)
+ (177)
+ (175)
+ (171)
+ (165)
+ (155)
+ (133)
+ (125)
+ (124)
+ (116)
+ (116)
+ (99)
+ (92)
+ (90)
+ (90)
+ (88)
+ (88)
+ (87)
+ (82)
+ (80)
+ (69)
+ (66)
+ (66)
+ (66)
+ (65)
+ (64)
+ (64)
+ (64)
+ (62)
+ (62)
+ (61)
+ (60)
+ (60)
+ (59)
+ (58)
+ (58)
+ (57)
+ (56)
+ (56)
+ (55)
+ (55)
+ (55)
+ (53)
+ (53)
+ (51)
+ (51)
+ (50)
+ (49)
+ (49)
+ (47)
+ (47)
+ (46)
+ (46)
+ (45)
+ (45)
+ (44)
+ (43)
+ (43)
+ (42)


Users that often use this tag:
zarq (116)
Miko (107)
homunculus (103)
Kattullus (102)
The Whelk (86)
plep (65)
anastasiav (53)
netbros (45)
matteo (43)
nickyskye (43)
infini (41)
Rumple (40)
carter (38)
Iridic (37)
brundlefly (35)
y2karl (33)
MartinWisse (33)
madamjujujive (32)
amyms (32)
filthy light thief (32)
Artw (29)
tellurian (28)
hama7 (27)
mediareport (26)
Chinese Jet Pilot (26)
marxchivist (25)
Trurl (24)
Abiezer (23)
stbalbach (21)
taz (21)
nthdegx (21)
languagehat (21)
kliuless (20)
caddis (18)
Mitheral (18)
dhruva (18)
Rhaomi (18)
Horace Rumpole (17)
jonson (16)
loquacious (16)
gman (15)
LarryC (14)
flapjax at midnite (14)
latkes (14)
Bora Horza Gobuchul (13)
Blasdelb (13)
reenum (12)
unliteral (12)
Joe Beese (12)
Ufez Jones (11)
Brandon Blatcher (11)
Effigy2000 (11)
timshel (11)
semmi (10)
monju_bosatsu (10)
amberglow (10)
OmieWise (10)
dersins (10)
feelinglistless (9)
mathowie (9)

Vintage Tech

The Douglas Self Site is an eclectic mix of web oddities including The Museum of RetroTechnology, some less than successful audio projects and the truth about Roswell. The RetroTech Museum is full of forgotten mechanical devices like monowheels, pneumatic networks, gyrocars, and optical telegraphs. (via dm)
posted by euphorb on Jul 24, 2004 - 2 comments

Small step for a man

Getting there, landing, getting back. And here's a panorama. Happy 35th Moonshot Day. (For real this time.)
posted by brownpau on Jul 20, 2004 - 11 comments

Aristophanes: the Michael Moore of his day.

Aristophanes: the Michael Moore of his day.
posted by stbalbach on Jul 18, 2004 - 27 comments

the day the genie was let out of the bottle

33 40' 31'' N - 106 28' 29'' W, 7/16/45, 05:29.45
posted by crunchland on Jul 16, 2004 - 21 comments

Apollo 11 (+35)

Today, it is 35 years since Apollo 11 landed on the moon. For detailed records of the events of that day, read the Apollo 11 Lunar Surface Journal. You can also take a look at the National Air and Space Museum's Apollo collection, or view photos from The Apollo Archive Image Gallery. Today, Neil Armstrong (who had meant to say "one small step for a man") leads a mostly private yet busy life, while Buzz Aldrin maintains a somewhat more public profile. Michael Collins, the much lesser-known astronaut who stayed in lunar orbit that day, went on to become Director of the National Air and Space Museum. As for those of you who still think the moon landing was faked, give it another think. Happy 35th Moon Shot Day! (Can you believe it?! The f-ing moon!!)
posted by brownpau on Jul 16, 2004 - 25 comments

Avast, ye scurvy dogs! Or something.

naval-history.net :: yet another fine example of how the web can help one man or woman with a true passion for a subject go from a hobbist to a published expert. Be sure to read the dedication to his dad at the top of the page.
posted by anastasiav on Jul 16, 2004 - 1 comment

BookFilters

The Forbidden Library.
posted by Gyan on Jul 12, 2004 - 26 comments

Stories about the lives we've made

Making the Modern World brings you powerful stories about science and invention from the eighteenth century to today. It explains the development and the global spread of modern industrial society and its effects on all our lives. The site expands upon the permanent landmark gallery at the Science Museum, using the Web and dynamic multimedia techniques to go far beyond what a static exhibition can do. Terrific wrapping, excellent content.
posted by tcp on Jul 12, 2004 - 4 comments

ProbabilityXLS

The History of Probability - Excel Version Huge detailed timeline. [via Roll the Bones]
posted by srboisvert on Jul 11, 2004 - 2 comments

well, they were a big hit at Plato's Laugh Shack

A man, just back from a trip abroad, went to an incompetent fortune-teller. He asked about his family, and the fortune-teller replied: "Everyone is fine, especially your father." When the man objected that his father had been dead for ten years, the reply came: "You have no clue who your real father is."--that's one of the jokes from The Laughter Lover (Philogelos), an ancient Greek joke book published in the 4th or 5th century AD. The New Yorker commented on it, and other old jokes here, stating about one of the possible authors: ... there is some scholarly speculation that the Hierocles in question was a fifth-century Alexandrian philosopher of that name who was once publicly flogged in Constantinople for paganism, which, as one classicist has observed, “might have given him a taste for mordant wit.”
posted by amberglow on Jul 10, 2004 - 12 comments

a series of expressions

120 Years of Electronic Music. Electronic musical instruments 1870 -1990.
posted by the fire you left me on Jul 10, 2004 - 12 comments

Hidden Lives Revealed

Hidden Lives Revealed. 'Hidden Lives Revealed provides an intriguing encounter with children who were in the care of The Children's Society in late Victorian and early 20th Century Britain. ' Via the 24 Hour Museum.
posted by plep on Jul 6, 2004 - 5 comments

100 Wonders of the World

The 100 Wonders of the World. A list, which includes both photos and a short description of all the wonders. The list may not be complete, but it's an interesting list for those of us, who love to travel. Italy seems to be a nice place to start, with 12 of the 100 wonders (1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12).
posted by einarorn on Jul 5, 2004 - 26 comments

Crimes of the century

Homicide in Chicago: 1870-1930
July 25, 1899 Murphy, James, 28 years old, shot dead, saloon 1210 Wabash Av., by Lorezo Sodini, proprietor. Murphy refused to pay for drinks and ran out of saloon and threw stone through window. Sodini ran out and fired at him, killing him instantly. Harrison St. Station. Held by Coroner's Jury, July 29. Acquitted Dec. 9, 1899, by jury in Judge Baker's court. Case number: 1498
posted by tcp on Jul 2, 2004 - 1 comment

Walt Whitman Archive

The Walt Whitman Archive, and the Poet at Work.
posted by hama7 on Jun 29, 2004 - 7 comments

Atlanta Time Machine

"The Atlanta Time Machine website is dedicated to examining the history of Atlanta, Georgia  by comparing vintage photographs of Atlanta with much more contemporary images shot, more or less, from the same perspective of the original photographer." [via kottke.org]
posted by kirkaracha on Jun 29, 2004 - 12 comments

Grain farming pushed back 10000 years

Farming origins gain 10,000 years. Humans made their first tentative steps towards farming 23,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. Stone Age people in Israel collected the seeds of wild grasses some 10,000 years earlier than previously recognised, say experts.
posted by stbalbach on Jun 27, 2004 - 8 comments

Batman was here.

Undercity reveals Gotham's secrets as uncovered by a guerrilla historian. [via Anil Dash]
posted by riffola on Jun 26, 2004 - 9 comments

Bach!

The J.S. Bach Home Page.
posted by Gyan on Jun 26, 2004 - 9 comments

The Beecher Family

The Beecher Family. 'Families that have been influential in American life and culture are often recognizable by their signature names. The Beecher family is an example of one such family whose deep religious convictions and social conscience spanned the nineteenth century and made them prominent historical figures whose impact on religion, education, abolition, reform movements, literature and public life were exceptional. Biographer Milton Rugoff claims that in "two generations the Beechers emerged, along with many other Americans, from a God-centered, theology-ridden world concerned with the fate of man's eternal soul into a man-centered society occupied mainly with life on earth." ... '
posted by plep on Jun 25, 2004 - 8 comments

Pontius Pilate contracted his brows, and his hand rose to his forehead...

"Jesus?" he murmured, "Jesus -- of Nazareth?..." Pontius Pilate, prefect of Judea, is the only historical figure named in the Nicene Creed -- Coptic saint or eternally damned, his role in the greatest story ever told has been debated by many of history's greatest minds: St Augustine, Dante Alighieri, Tintoretto, John Ruskin, Mikhail Bulgakov, Monty Python. Unfortunately, there is very little historical evidence about him. His role in the death of a certain charismatic Galilean healer and apocalyptic preacher is still being debated today by theologians and historians alike. He is also, of course, the main character of The Procurator of Judea, the classic short story (complete text in main link) by Anatole France. (France's magnificent story has lately been tragically neglected by publishers, even if the author was one of his era's most acclaimed writers in the world -- he won the Nobel Prize in 1921 over Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, Thomas Hardy, D.H. Lawrence, and Proust, and when he died in 1924, hundreds of thousands of people followed his funeral procession through Paris). These last 2,000 years of fascination with Pilatus can be explained, some argue... (more inside, for those unwilling to wash their hands of this post)
posted by matteo on Jun 24, 2004 - 37 comments

When the circus came to town...

Defunct amusement parks. It has postcards and historical photos. It also has relatively current photos of parks in various states of disrepair. A great site for fans of entropy, like myself. (via Linkfilter)
posted by jester69 on Jun 16, 2004 - 27 comments

All the presidents' presidents

US Presidents: Lists and Records. For Presidential Historians and Trivia addicts only. More inside
posted by psmealey on Jun 16, 2004 - 5 comments

German Helmets

The Online Reference Guide to World War II German Helmets 1933-1945.
posted by starscream on Jun 15, 2004 - 31 comments

Terrible affair that General Slocum explosion...

One hundred years ago today, 1,358 members of the Kleindeutschland, the German neighborhood on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, boarded a chartered ferry named the General Slocum for a picnic excursion to Long Island. A fire broke out in the ship's hold while it cruised up the East River, the captain ran the vessel aground on the rocky shores of North Brother Island amid the swift currents of Hell Gate, and when it was all over 1,021 people (mainly women and children) had perished by drowning or from the fire, and it remained the worst single-day New York City disaster until 9/11.
posted by Vidiot on Jun 15, 2004 - 16 comments

Before and After

Before and After
Cosmetic surgery was born 2,500 years ago and came of age in the inferno of the Western Front. The Great War not only gave birth to plastic surgery as a modern medical specialty but also marked a rare moment when the proponents of reconstructive or “serious” surgery and the defenders of cosmetic or “frivolous” surgery declared a truce in what would become a long and morally charged battle.
posted by Irontom on Jun 14, 2004 - 3 comments

Where is this country headed?

Is U.S. like Germany of the '30s?
posted by Rastafari on Jun 12, 2004 - 139 comments

anniversary

10 years ago today, and the killer is still at large.
posted by crunchland on Jun 12, 2004 - 46 comments

Iraq, Manchuria, Askari Street--It's The History News Network!

From Nanjing 1937 to Fallujah 2004; Is the U.S. Repeating the Mistakes of Japan in the 1930s?; Attempting Analogy: Japanese Manchuria and Occupied Iraq and Manchuria and Iraq, 1932 and 2004: you can kiss that Vietnam analogy good bye--when historians talk history, they range farther afield. I ♥ the History News Network! Here is food for thought at an all night, all you can eat smorgasbord--those who teach history are condemned to discuss it and we're all the better for it.

For example, Hala Fattah's Askari Street is my current favorite Iraqi weblog. She gives us the history of the Arab horse, the Pachachi family, the Shammar tribe and Kirkuk, and its place in Iraqi History and she has barely begun to write.
HNN: oh, it's an embarrassment of riches and a fount of endless fascination.
posted by y2karl on Jun 11, 2004 - 23 comments

Let her go, let her go, God bless her...

The story of "St. James Infirmary." You thought it was a piece of old New Orleans? Turns out St. James Hospital was in London (and treated lepers), and the song goes back at least to the 18th century (though it used to be sung to the tune of "Streets of Laredo"). Rob Walker's Letter From New Orleans #13 describes the results of his obsessive researches. If you have more info, he wants to hear from you! (Via Wordorigins, a site any word lover should know.)
posted by languagehat on Jun 11, 2004 - 9 comments

Today In Alternate History

Today In Alternate History, blogging the what if: "In 1984, John Lennon, an obscure musician who had once been in a band with international sensation Pete Best, writes a tell-all book about Best, detailing their crazy life in Hamburg, Germany, and their rough-and-tumble beginnings in Liverpool, England. The book, I Want To Tell You, is an international best-seller."
posted by feelinglistless on Jun 10, 2004 - 11 comments

the death of lincoln

the death of lincoln. Originally from June 1865. "The murder of President Lincoln aroused a feeling of regret deeper than was ever before known in our history. Men and papers who had opposed his policy and vilified him personally, now vied with his adherents and friends in lauding the rare wisdom and goodness which marked his conduct and character." Hmmmm... sounds familiar.
posted by sunexplodes on Jun 9, 2004 - 36 comments

The Suicide’s Soliloquy

The Suicide’s Soliloquy August 25, 1838, the Sangamo Journal, a Whig newspaper in Springfield, Illinois, carried an unsigned poem, thirty-six lines long. It stands out for two reasons: first, its subject is suicide; second, its author was most likely a twenty-nine-year-old politician and lawyer named Abraham Lincoln. Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin relates how historians regard a broken off engagement to Mary Todd as the trigger to his famous depression, but it was his perceived failure as politician, she maintains, that fed Lincoln's "black dog". (For his depression, Lincoln probably took "blue mass", a drug prescribed to treat "hypochondriasis," a vague term that included melancholia). Lincoln's medical history file is here
posted by matteo on Jun 7, 2004 - 12 comments

See the USA in your CHEVROLET

The Old Car Manual Project
posted by anastasiav on Jun 1, 2004 - 5 comments

America's First POWs

America's First POWs. The Department of Defense says there were 4,435 battle deaths during the Revolutionary War. More than twice as many Americans died in British prison ships in New York Harbor. You can get an idea of their suffering from the news stories I've linked, or read a more detailed account written in the 1860s from Henry R. Stiles's A History of the City of Brooklyn (scroll down a bit and keep hitting Next). There are more links at this site, which focuses on the long-neglected Monument for the Prison Ship Martyrs in Brooklyn's Fort Greene Park. A remembrance for Memorial Day.
posted by languagehat on May 31, 2004 - 6 comments

Quakers on the WWW

Digital Quaker Collection Courtesy of Earlham College, the Digital Quaker Collection offers free access to "over 500 individual Quaker works from the 17th and 18th centuries." More historical texts, including many from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, are available from The Quaker Writings Home Page. (Main link via Scribblingwoman.)
posted by thomas j wise on May 31, 2004 - 5 comments

The Bakken: A social history of electricity

The Bakken: A social history of electricity The Bakken is a growing center "for education and learning that furthers the understanding of the history, cultural context, and applications of electricity and magnetism in the life sciences and their benefits to contemporary society." The site includes an illustrated collection of artifacts ranging from static electricity generators and Leyden jars to Victorian therapeutic magnetic belts, and exhibitions on Mesmer and Mesmerism and Mary Shelley and Frankenstein. The institute was founded by Earl Bakken, the co-inventor of the pacemaker.
posted by carter on May 30, 2004 - 2 comments

Avoid such old-fashioned, time-wasting answers as

How To Make Friends By Telephone :: a useful how-to book from the 1940's
posted by anastasiav on May 27, 2004 - 22 comments

JQKA

It's all in the cards: an interesting look at the development and design of playing cards.
Despite their global origins, playing cards are a uniquely American art form. Looking at a deck of cards provides a glimpse of social, economic, and advertising history.

posted by jazon on May 25, 2004 - 6 comments

Old Family Photos

Gallery of the Unamed. As much as i love digital cameras, i doubt that in a hundred years our descendants will rummage thru stacks of old flash cards or CD's looking for pictures. Here is almost 10,000 old photographs...not only the unknown, but Civil War veterans, railroads, fire departments...or you can search by location or surname. I've already spent hours and hours looking. Have some of your own? Go ahead and send them in...
posted by th3ph17 on May 24, 2004 - 14 comments

The Papers of George Washington

Washington's Farewell Address, from The Papers of George Washington.
posted by hama7 on May 22, 2004 - 4 comments

A Visit to Old Los Angeles

A Visit to Old Los Angeles "A pictorial survey of downtown Los Angeles, and certain other areas, focusing on the years 1900 to 1915, though occasionally making use of images from other times. This series will follow, primarily by means of actual postcards of the era, the travels of a farming family from the great plains as they visit Los Angeles and its environs in the early years of the Twentieth Century." In 29 episodes, and with lots of postcards.
posted by carter on May 21, 2004 - 5 comments

Hey, hey LBJ! How many containers did you ship today?

Cargo cultists versus Christians. Two religions enter, one religion leaves! Differences have led to murder on an island near Oceania. Many of us learned about cargo cults from Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel. However, it seems that there's more to the story, including a Lyndon Johnson connection.
posted by Mayor Curley on May 21, 2004 - 15 comments

Decameron Web

Decameron Web: A Growing Hypermedia Archive of Boccaccio's Masterpiece.
posted by hama7 on May 19, 2004 - 6 comments

Sex and violence

Sex and PsyOps. An interesting look at sexual propaganda throughout modern military history. Unfortunately slightly censored, but a good look into what may or may not have been an effective demoralization tool.
posted by eas98 on May 19, 2004 - 25 comments

Famous Unsolved Codes and Ciphers

Famous Unsolved Codes and Ciphers
posted by anastasiav on May 18, 2004 - 13 comments

Look Magazine

Emmett Till's murder case has been reopened, nearly fifty years after the killers' acquittal. Don't I mean alleged killers? No, the cretins happily confessed all to a national newsweekly after their trial. A thousand details here, and a couple more in the subsequent letters to the editor, that will forever kill any nostalgia you might have for the "old days."
posted by stupidsexyFlanders on May 14, 2004 - 8 comments

Jodie Dallas LIVES!

If you're in New York City or LA between now and June 27th, the Museum of Television and Radio is presenting "Not That There's Anything Wrong With That --The History of Gay and Lesbian Images on Television" (via the Queer as Folk section of Showtime's site) (Anyone else remember Robert Reed playing a transsexual on Medical Center?)
posted by WolfDaddy on May 11, 2004 - 14 comments

Chat Rm 33006

The Great American Feud. Hatfield - McCoy timeline and photo gallery. 2003 VA news report on a truce between descendants of both families. Also, Congress has appropriated nearly $500,000 to improve feud sites for tourism. You can even help one of the families win a Reunion Marathon this June.
posted by mcgraw on May 10, 2004 - 9 comments

That was then...

A Report on Mesopotamia by T.E. Lawrence, August 2nd, 1920.
posted by homunculus on May 9, 2004 - 13 comments

Page: 1 ... 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 ... 74