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Double Vision

Stephen Soderbergh combines both versions of Psycho to create "Psychos" Director Stephen Soderbergh has just posted, via his blog a link to Psychos, his combining of Alfred Hitchcock's classic Psycho and the slightly less well received Gus Van Sant "shot for shot remake".
posted by chris88 on Feb 25, 2014 - 30 comments

A History of Horror, a personal journey of horror films with Mark Gatiss

"The cinema was made for horror movies. No other kind of film offers that same mysterious anticipation as you head into a dark auditorium. No other makes such powerful use of sound and image. The cinema is where we come to share a collective dream and horror films are the most dreamlike of all, perhaps because they engage with our nightmares." And so Mark Gatiss opens his three-part series, A History of Horror. "One of the great virtues of this series is that it is thoroughly subjective. Gatiss does not feel any particular obligation to give us an A to Z of horror, but instead lingers lovingly over his own favourites," taking the viewer with him from the Golden Age of Hollywood horror through the American horror movies of the 1960s and 1970s. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 28, 2014 - 17 comments

... he was utterly appalled by "the real thing."

"In 1945, Hitchcock had been enlisted by his friend and patron Sidney Bernstein to help with a documentary on German wartime atrocities, based on the footage of the camps shot by British and Soviet film units. In the event, that documentary was never seen." A truncated version of Alfred Hitchcock's Holocaust documentary was aired on Frontline in 1985 under the name "Memory of the Camps" (YouTube mirror), but now the restoration work on the film is nearly complete and set to be released later this year. The film is "much more candid" than other documentaries, and Hitchcock himself was reported to have been so disturbed during production that he stayed away from his studio for a week. (Given the subject matter, disturbing content throughout.) [more inside]
posted by jbickers on Jan 8, 2014 - 39 comments

We Don't Joke About Such Things Here

The 1991 CBs made-for-TV movie adaptation of Shadow Of A Doubt and the 1943 Alfred Hitchcock version are based on the same source material and contain many of the same lines, beats, and scenes. So why is one considered a classic film noir and the other a flop? The Dissolve puts the two movies next to each other and tries to find out.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 29, 2013 - 15 comments

Happy 114, Mr Hitchcock!

The Hitchcock Infographic
posted by crossoverman on Aug 13, 2013 - 18 comments

Hitchcock assembled

Hitchcock assembled. At the time, Hitchcock had many restrictions placed upon when creating this film. This is a perfect example of restriction breeding creativity.
posted by twoleftfeet on Jun 23, 2013 - 22 comments

Have You Heard?

Alfred Hitchcock ‘Directs’ a LIFE Picture Story, 1942. "...perhaps no filmmaker provided richer fodder for the Allies during the war itself than Alfred (later Sir Alfred) Hitchcock. Between 1940 and 1945, Hitch made films for England’s Ministry of Information as well as several excellent movies featuring plots that centered on the war (Saboteur, Foreign Correspondent, the remarkable Lifeboat and others). Hitchcock’s most unusual director’s credit from the 1940s, however, wasn’t attached to a movie at all, but instead appeared in the July 13, 1942, issue of LIFE magazine. Titled Have You Heard? (The Story of Wartime Rumors), the feature carrying Hitchcock’s name is a war thriller in photos, shot by LIFE’s Eliot Elisofon from a plot 'suggested by' FDR’s press secretary, Stephen Early, and 'directed by' Hitchcock himself."
posted by HumanComplex on Jun 13, 2013 - 5 comments

As he whispers in my ear: "Tonight you will die as a Hitchcock starlet"

Before The Pleasure Garden (Alfred Hitchcock's directorial debut) was released in 1925, Hitchcock's worked on a numerous silent films as both an assistant director and an art director. Now recently recovered and restored footage from one of his oldest, long-lost films, 1924's The White Shadow, has been released online, and you can watch it now at Film Preservation. (Via io9). Running time: About 43 minutes.
posted by Mezentian on Nov 21, 2012 - 3 comments

Hitchcock can get away with murder.

Hitchcock frets not at his narrow room. David Bordwell takes a look at Dial M for Murder, its roots in filmed theater and its dealing of the conventions of 3D filmmaking.
posted by shakespeherian on Sep 8, 2012 - 6 comments

"Iwerks is Screwy spelled backwards" -- Chuck Jones

"Over the years in animation, there have been a lot of great animators. Ub Iwerks was one of those people. We know his work, but we don't necessarily know the man." The Hand Behind the Mouse: The Ub Iwerks Story (in 5 parts on DailyMotion: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) tells of the life of Ubbe Eert Iwerks, from the formation of the friendship with Walt Disney when they met at advertisement studio in Kansas City, their artistic collaborations and Ub's 20 years of animation, to Iwerk's technical creations that kept Disney animated pictures ahead of other studios. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 31, 2012 - 14 comments

Nobody in a costume picture ever goes to the toilet.

Alfred Hitchcock takes us inside his creative process in this fascinating 1964 program from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. “A Talk with Alfred Hitchcock” is part interview, part master class in the craft of telling stories on film. (via Open Culture) [more inside]
posted by nosila on Feb 18, 2012 - 6 comments

How to make sense of Conspiracy Theories

"How to make sense of Conspiracy Theories" [Part 1 of 9 from YouTube] Rob Ager is best known for his very thoughtful analyses of films such as The Shining [see also this analysis of the Overlook's geometry, previously], A Clockwork Orange [and supplement], Psycho, Pulp Fiction, Aliens, Taxi Driver and others. He has recently completed an analysis of the subject of conspiracy theories. "All of us, from time to time, will believe that two or more people in a particular context have conspired to achieve a mutual aim – be it cheating in a card game or engineering an international war. It isn’t by definition a lapse in logic to believe that a conspiracy has or is going to occur in a given situation. Conspiracies do happen and it is a natural facet of healthy thinking and self-preservation to seek out awareness of conspiracies that may affect our lives." [Text version, Ager's Collative Learning site]
posted by McLir on Jan 18, 2012 - 53 comments

Vertigo Variations by B. Kite and Alexander Points-Zollo

<<Vertigo is an impossible object: a gimcrack plot studded with strange gaps that nonetheless rides a pulse of peculiar necessity, a field of association that simultaneously expands and contracts like its famous trick shot, a ghost story whose spirits linger even after having been apparently explained away, and a study of obsession that becomes an obsessive object in its own right, situated likewise on the edge of unreality. This video series avoids assigning the film any determinate shape and tries instead to enter it through a number of side doors, each indicative of a way of seeing. Part 1 (QT dl ~500mb) explored some of the ground-level weirdness of the film’s construction, offers a suggestion that the film may exist in its own unique tense, and examines two iterations of the (Chris) Marker Hypothesis*. Part 2 (QT dl ~1.5gB) is spooky, reading the film through a phantom appendage then laying down a sort of Vertigo tarot before moving onto slightly more solid ground with a new consideration of Hitchcock’s concept of the MacGuffin. Part 3 (QT dl ~1.9gB) takes the zoom-in-track-out as an emblem, reconsiders the issue of point of view, then throws all the pieces back up in the air. That’s a thematic rundown, from the position of the narrator. The images have their own agendas, which often coincide but sometimes don’t.>> [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Dec 29, 2011 - 13 comments

Everybody's Got The Shining

Arthur recreates scenes from classic movies.
posted by mippy on Nov 9, 2011 - 26 comments

One sister with no soul...

Lost Hitchcock film partially recovered. Starring Betty Compson as twins, three reels of The White Shadow have been discovered; Hitchcock was credited as the writer, but is considered by some to have been the co-director. It becomes the oldest extant Hitchcock film, and is part of a partially-explored cache of nitrate film help by the New Zealand Film Archives.
posted by rodgerd on Aug 3, 2011 - 16 comments

Kiss Me

Kiss me you fool!
posted by puny human on May 13, 2011 - 14 comments

"I ought to warn you, if you haven't read any of my stories, that you may be a little disturbed by some of the things that happen."

Though Roald Dahl is better known in this day as the author of stories for children, he had a parallel career as the author of short stories with more adult, macabre sensibilities. Some of those stories became part of a short-run series to fill the slot of to not one but two ill-fated Jackie Gleason shows. But instead of another game show or talk show, CBS wanted something to pair with the Twilight Zone. That show was Way Out, though it didn't rate well and only ran for 14 episodes (and 5 episodes are on Archive.org). 18 years later, Dahl returned to TV with his sinister stories, but this time it was in the UK, where Tales of the Unexpected lasted 9 seasons, 112 episodes in total. You can view 23 or so episodes online, split into parts (YT Playlist). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 22, 2011 - 27 comments

Battenberg

DEATH / HITCHCOCK (SLYT) (NSFW - brief nudity)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Mar 9, 2011 - 31 comments

"If cinema is sometimes dreamlike, then every edit is an awakening." -Roger Ebert

The long take, an uncut, uninterrupted shot in film, is seen by some as the counter to CGI, the last great field for cinematic art. The linked page features six clips from 1990 on, plus the opening shot from Orson Welles' 1958 film, Touch of Evil. Alfred Hitchcock's film from a decade earlier, Rope, took the long cut further, with the whole film shot in eight takes of up to 10 minutes each, a decision shaped by the limit of the physical recording media. With digital media, the long take could be pushed further, as with Russian Ark, from 2002. The movie was shot in one long take, with the narrative working through the history of Russia, set within The State Hermitage Museum, and captured in one day on the 4th take. If the long takes are a tad long for you, try the "short" long takes that are one-shot music videos [videos inside] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 28, 2010 - 74 comments

Skyscrapers & Submarines

Mr. Bungle Monday!!! In their 15-year career, the band only made one music video and it was banned by MTV for being ... well, generally deranged. Quote Unquote was originally called Travolta but Warner Bros. pressured them into changing the title. Luckily, their 3rd and final album left enough of a lasting impression to warrant fanmade videos. Thus, we now have: a)YT user tkan's Chris Cunningham-inspired Retrovertigo & the Hitchcock-esque Pink Cigarette clips; b)YT user Illusionoel's Goodbye Sober Day, which reworks footage from Baraka; and c)Vertigo, a beautiful medley of the album itself, California, performed by a highschool drumline [more inside]
posted by mannequito on Sep 27, 2010 - 28 comments

Mother isn't quite herself today.

The secrets of "Psycho's" shower scene. "In the course of my research, I read one allegation about the weeklong filming of the scene that both troubled and intrigued me, but none of the reference books I consulted elaborated on the assertion."
posted by Obscure Reference on Jun 26, 2010 - 89 comments

So far The Conversations has not discussed The Conversation.

'The Conversations is a monthly feature in which Jason Bellamy and Ed Howard discuss a wide range of cinematic subjects: critical analyses of films, filmmaker overviews, and more. Readers should expect to encounter spoilers.' Including: Passion of the Christ vs. The Last Temptation of Christ, Mulholland Dr., Pixar, and others.
posted by shakespeherian on May 14, 2010 - 10 comments

Truffaut/Hitchcock

The complete series of interviews of Alfred Hitchcock by François Truffaut (with interpreter Helen Scott) which were used to create the classic book, with some nice photos and commentary.
posted by serazin on May 5, 2010 - 19 comments

Violins and Violence

In 1960, Alfred Hitchcock created the most notorious sequence in the history of cinema - the shower sequence from Psycho. Thousands film students have studied it, dozens of books have been written on it) and...

One man became so obsessed with the sequence that he murdered The Girl In Hitchock's Shower. [more inside]
posted by cinemafiend on Apr 1, 2010 - 10 comments

"The birds attacked me but Hitch was scarier."

Tippi Hedren in make-up test stills for The Birds,*
posted by xod on Dec 29, 2009 - 36 comments

Alfred Hitchcock on The Tomorrow Show

"Long thought to be lost or destroyed, this complete recording of one of the few hour long interviews of Alfred Hitchcock has been found." [more inside]
posted by dhammond on Oct 12, 2009 - 17 comments

Birds Minus Birds

Give Us Today Our Daily Terror is an exact copy of Hitchcock’s 1963 film The Birds from which all the birds have been removed. Video: 1-2-3 Stills
posted by vronsky on Apr 12, 2008 - 47 comments

And Introducing Seth Rogen as Cary Grant in North by Northwest!

Hitchcock Classics as illustrated in the 2008 Hollywood Portfolio from Vanity Fair.
posted by dhammond on Feb 8, 2008 - 34 comments

Hitchcock on Hitchcock

Hitchcock on Hitchcock: Alfred Hitchcock reflects on his career in movies, discussing among other things, the origin of the term "MacGuffin", his creative process and what his earliest fear was.
posted by empath on Dec 17, 2007 - 7 comments

The Key to Reserva

The Key to Reserva Scorcese films a “lost” Hitchcock script. [more inside]
posted by breaks the guidelines? on Nov 30, 2007 - 36 comments

Hitchcock Triple Feature

Though not as commonly known, Alfred Hitchcock's late British period is nonetheless an intriguing look at what delights were to come from his later work.

Secret Agent (1936 | Wikipedia | Download)
Young and Innocent (1937 | Wikipedia | Download)
Jamaica Inn (1939 | Wikipedia | Download)

posted by dhammond on Nov 25, 2007 - 15 comments

Mother isn't quite herself today.

Norman Bates and that oh, so famous shower scene... [more inside]
posted by miss lynnster on Nov 24, 2007 - 47 comments

Virtuoso Vertiginousness

Vertigo got you spinning? The answers to your problems and more are available at the Hitchcock DVD Wiki.
posted by felix on Jun 25, 2007 - 5 comments

M Is For Montage

How to make a film like Hitchcock would have. Also, a sociological perspective on guilt and innocence in Hitchcock's work - rituals of liminality (pdf). (via)
posted by chlorus on Jun 20, 2007 - 16 comments

Charlie Parker, gunslinger

Thomas Sutpen is one of Faulkner's most complex and intriguing characters. His blog, If Charlie Parker was a gunslinger, there’d be a whole lot of dead copycats includes nostalgic collections of rare photographs in serial form. Samples: They Were Collaborators (298) Great Con Artists of the 20th Century (14) Vietnam - Dramatis Personae (7) A is for Arbus (37) Collect 'em All (26) The Golden Age of Prurience (37) Poets are both clean and warm (18). Many wonderful others on the sidebar.
posted by growabrain on Apr 21, 2007 - 13 comments

They never found her head

Dr. Crippen. He poisoned his wife, buried her in the basement, and then escaped with his female lover disguised as man and son aboard a ship. Then there was Patrick Mahon, who chopped up his mistress and stashed her in a trunk at Waterloo Station, among other places. The connection between these two men? Aside from addressing the problem of how to dispose of a body, they inspired Rear Window.
posted by Astro Zombie on Sep 12, 2006 - 10 comments

Hitchock Underground

In 1999, to mark the centennial of Alfred Hitchock's birth in the Leytonstone district of London, 17 mosaics were installed in the entrance corridors of Leytonstone tube station. Each mosaic celebrates a different Hitchock masterpiece. True to form, Hitch makes several cameos among the mosaics.
posted by lilbrudder on Aug 7, 2006 - 18 comments

Stills from Alfred Hitchcock's movies

Hitchcock Gallery. Stills from Sir Alfred's movies: Hitchcock blondes. Mothers in Hitchcock movies. Dangling and falling. Eyes in Hitchcock movies. Match cuts. 'Tunnel' shots. 'Pieta' shots. How to throw a punch. Also: Hitchcock & Psychoanalysis. (homepage)
posted by matteo on Feb 2, 2006 - 14 comments

Leonard J. South, Hitchcock's Camera Operator

"Hitch was always trying to push the limits on techniques and to be different".
Cary Grant chased by a crop-duster plane in a corn field; Janet Leigh screaming in the shower; Tippi Hedren attacked by killer seagulls. The man behind lens? Leonard J. South (1914-2006) , Hitchcock's camera operator. More inside.
posted by PenguinBukkake on Jan 17, 2006 - 13 comments

Michael, I'm On iTunes

iTunes Gets NBC Shows. And not just this season's: like a page out of Infinite Jest, iTunes and NBC are serving up classic NBC programs, including Knight Rider and Hitchcock Presents. (note: sorry - first link goes to iTunes Music Store -- no press releases available yet to link to.)
posted by eustacescrubb on Dec 6, 2005 - 32 comments

The killer is....

Hitchcock's infamous shower scene from Psycho overlayed with the '98 remake by Gus Van Sant: .mov (via Waxy)
posted by dirtylittlemonkey on Apr 21, 2005 - 22 comments

Hitchcockian Horrors

On this day in 1963 Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" was released into the world, causing us to forever tread lightly around pigeons. Anyone wanna lend me $18,950 so I can celebrate?
posted by shoppingforsanity on Mar 28, 2005 - 21 comments

Or he became me.

TCM is playing tribute this month to Archie Leach, better known to the world as Cary Grant. The range of films, the types of roles, the co-stars. Makes you long for another era of american film-making. Of interest to you architect types might be Mr. Blandings Builds his Dream House of 1948, with the fabulous Myrna Loy - whose 1947 film The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer partly occupies that special message place on my answering machine. Grant's films with Hitchcock - especially North by Northwest with its great fake FLW house and fantastic Saul Bass titles - Cukor, and Hawks are well worth searching out. Don't miss his final role - Walk Don't Run - a film set at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, and itself a remake of The More the Merrier of 1943. Who said that Hollywood couldn't do remakes?

One of the most interesting items to come out of the TCM documentary is Cary's embracing LSD in the early pre-illegal tests of it.
posted by grimley on Jun 1, 2004 - 25 comments

psychokid

Alfred Hitchcock meets Star Wars Kid [note: 7 mb WMV (Windows Media) file]
posted by crunchland on Sep 4, 2003 - 9 comments

Vertigo, Then and Now

Vertigo then and now is a collection of pictures from Vertigo, then and now. [via Scrubbles]
posted by y10k on Apr 5, 2003 - 13 comments

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