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Creature House Expressions

Microsoft is giving away a nifty piece of software. It's the beta of Expressions 3 by Creature House, something I used to use back in my Mac days but hadn't heard anything about in a long time. Apparently MS bought Creature House last year. I downloaded it (after filling out a somewhat arduous survey/profile thingy) and think it a nice drawing program. Both Mac and Win versions are posted.
posted by bz on Jun 9, 2004 - 30 comments

 

Bwah ha ha ha ha! Boo!

The GashlyCrumb Tinies "A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs", "B is for Basil, assaulted by Bears", "C is for Clara, who wasted away", D is for Desmond, thrown out of a sleigh", "E is for Earnest, who choked on a peach", "F is for Fanny, sucked dry by a leech" - But, as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. Edward Gorey's GashlyCrumb Tinies, A-Z, in pictures - done in by bears, tacks, gin, awls, mires, fires, mice, ennui......enjoy!
posted by troutfishing on Apr 14, 2004 - 32 comments

Animal Love - All together now... Awwwweeeee

Tragic Animal Love Stories - Simple drawings with sweet messages. via
posted by willnot on Apr 2, 2004 - 4 comments

Botanical illustrations

Smithsonian Catalog of Botanical Illustrations Feel the need for a touch of spring? The Smithsonian offers five hundred images (created by eleven artists) from its vast collection of botanical illustrations. Check out the images in the Curtis Botanical Magazine (1787-1807). For more wide-ranging overviews, try the Scientific Illustrators (1600-present); the Missouri Botanical Garden Library (digitized copies of 46 rare books); this special exhibition at the University of Delaware (general survey); and Haley & Steele (women artists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries). Julene Sodt provides an extensive bibliography.
posted by thomas j wise on Mar 8, 2004 - 2 comments

Funny strange......

Graham Roumieu is one twisted puppy. His illustrations highlight the absurdities of modern life and should give us all something to chuckle about.
posted by elwoodwiles on Jan 14, 2004 - 6 comments

Buy this art!

Buy this art! or just spend a lot of time looking.
posted by hypnorich on Jan 8, 2004 - 4 comments

Rare Botany Books

The Missouri Botanical Garden Library has scanned and posted 46 volumes of its rare book collection. 16,133 pages and 2,050 beautiful illustrations are currently available.
As an example, see this engraving of a foxglove by Pierre Vallet from 1608.
posted by thatwhichfalls on Dec 22, 2003 - 7 comments

The business model of the funny pages

When I was in college in the early 90s (B.W. -- before web), I used to subscribe to the daily newspaper just to get my comics fix every morning (back when Bill Waterson, Gary Larson, and Berkeley Breathed were king). Then the web came along and I had to suffer through the only (unfunny) cartoonist to embrace the web. But not anymore. With stuff like Comics-via-RSS and Comictastic I can fire up an app and start laughing every morning. I doubt I ever buy a newspaper again for the funny pages, and on top of that, these even let me avoid the lame ones I don't care about.
posted by mathowie on Dec 4, 2003 - 24 comments

It's all about the Love, baybee

Yeah baby! Bite my toenails! Funny, sad, simple, sweet, it's all about the luuurve. Remics Vol. 3 features illustrations by 29 artists on the theme of "love"; past editions (Flash and some sound) explored thoughts on "Place" and "Birthday".
posted by taz on Nov 20, 2003 - 7 comments

Fantastic in Art & Fiction - images of the grotesque, marvelous and macabre

The Fantastic in Art & Fiction - Cornell University's bank of nearly 300 images of the fantastic, the grotesque, the macabre, the marvelous and more "from works spanning a period from medieval manuscripts and printed incunabulae, to the early twentieth century."
posted by madamjujujive on Nov 16, 2003 - 6 comments

Images from Science

Images from Science - An Exhibition of Scientific Photography.
posted by ashbury on Oct 28, 2003 - 4 comments

Prison Funnies

Prison Funnies
posted by dobbs on Oct 21, 2003 - 7 comments

groovy, groovy, groovy digital collage

The Mandala Project by artist Genevieve Gauckler will make you happy. I promise. (For more happiness, also see The Emperors, L'Arbre Généalogique, and everything else.)
posted by taz on Oct 11, 2003 - 3 comments

William Steig,

William Steig, children's author, New Yorker illustrator, and creator of Shrek, is dead.
posted by Robot Johnny on Oct 4, 2003 - 9 comments

Shakespeare photographs

Cleveland Press Shakespeare Photographs Er, no, not photographs of Shakespeare--that would be difficult--but of Shakespeare's plays in performance, 1870-1982. Covers productions in all media; photographs can be browsed by dramatic genre (tragedy, comedy, etc.). On a related note, see also Harry Rusche's Shakespeare Illustrated (outstanding and extensive site devoted to nineteenth-century paintings of scenes from Shakespeare's plays).
posted by thomas j wise on Sep 27, 2003 - 6 comments

Space art in children's books

Let's go on a rocket trip to the Moon! A collection of space art in children's books, 1883 to 1974. These books, and their evocative art, instilled in a generation the romance and wonder of space flight. I grew up in the 1950's, and as a kid I could pour over this book and its illustrations for hours, dreaming.
via A Voyage to Arcturus
posted by Slithy_Tove on Sep 26, 2003 - 8 comments

You can give them to the birds and bees.

You've probably never heard of him, but as an artist JSG Boggs has been making "money" for two decades. Boggs has been the subject of many articles, a film, and a book by Lawrence Welscher. He's bought lots of things with his art ("Hot dogs, watches, airplane tickets, rent, clothing, jewelry–-anything." (And he's done so in England, Germany, France, Ireland, Belgium, Switzerland, the USA, and Italy.) The largest collection of his works belongs to The Secret Service. [more inside]
posted by dobbs on Sep 21, 2003 - 17 comments

If you drop this box on a dog, don't trip over its tail

Hall of Technical Documentation Weirdness, a collection of weird technical documentation illustrations, oddly enough.
via Macintouch
posted by jpburns on Sep 16, 2003 - 7 comments

Chromolithographs of E.L. Trouvelot

The Chromolithographs of E.L. Trouvelot. "Etienne Leopold Trouvelot (1827-1895), a French-born artist and amateur astronomer, spent 15 years observing the heavens and making original drawings from his observations: 'While my aim in this work has been to combine scrupulous fidelity and accuracy in the details, I have also endeavored to preserve the natural elegance and the delicate outlines peculiar to the objects depicted.' To illustrate his observations of celestial objects and phenomena, Trouvelot selected fifteen of his drawings to be reproduced using chromolithography, an illustration process that was at the zenith of its development in the 1880's." Heavens Above is a NYPL exhibit that compares his art and science to contemporary photos by NASA of the same phenomena.
posted by eyebeam on Sep 16, 2003 - 8 comments

The Princess of Wax - a Cruel Tale

"A wicked noblewoman presides over a decadent court of masked revelers. The most beautiful of waxen automatons is brought to life by a sorceress, her very heart hiding a deadly secret. And then love triumphs, if but for a single moment, before a sudden and terrifying finale. This is the bizarre world of The Princess of Wax".

Limned by descriptors such as "sinister", "ravishing" and "decadent", illustrated by a noted French surrealist painter, and inspired by a real-life fantastical figure, "The Princess of Wax - a Cruel Tale" (web site here), promises to be a satisfyingly twisted modern addition to the cherished fairy tale genre. More >>>
posted by taz on Sep 15, 2003 - 9 comments

these are not your mother's wide-eyed waifs

Mark Ryden is to the iconic saucer-eyed urchins of the '60s as Salvador Dali is to Hickory Dickory Dock. His delicate palette, fine details and classical references offer compelling counterpoint to the deliciously disturbing imagery of les tykes terrible in collections such as "Blood: Miniature Paintings of Sorrow & Fear"; "Bunnies and Bees: Paintings Created to Illustrate DIVINE TRUTH in Accordance with the Secret Principles of SCIENCE AND SOUL"; and "The Meat Show: Paintings about Childen, God, and USDA Grade A Beef". Plus, they're kids - with big eyes!
posted by taz on Sep 8, 2003 - 25 comments

Tom Feelings

Tom Feelings, an African-American illustrator, author, and historian, has passed. "I had used the functional form of a narrative without words, it is open to all people, especially those who have difficulty visualizing what Black people describe as racism from the past and its lingering presence in the present."
posted by moonbird on Aug 29, 2003 - 2 comments

Peepshow: a dozen British illustrators show their stuff

Peepshow - Sunday art stroll: this cute little site is a quick flash tour through the portfolios of a dozen funky and fun British illustrators.
posted by madamjujujive on Aug 24, 2003 - 6 comments

American History

US National Archives & Records Administration Exhibit Hall. Some good American history pieces - the Emancipation Proclamation, government drawings, 20th century photographs, the New Deal and the arts, panoramic photography, 1970s Chicago, World War 2 posters, gifts to presidents, and more.
posted by plep on Jul 3, 2003 - 4 comments

U.K. R.G.

The U.K.'s answer to Rube Goldberg. Cartoonist W. Heath Robinson, 1872-1944.
posted by crunchland on Jun 20, 2003 - 1 comment

Portfolios from cool contemporary illustrators

Sunday art stroll - visit the portfolios of some contemporary illustrators and artists ranging from the sweet, the sophisticated, and the sexy to the satiric and the strange. (flash warning and some illustrated nudity)
posted by madamjujujive on Jun 1, 2003 - 9 comments

1957 atomic revolution comic book!

1957 atomic revolution comic book. Quite a find for 1950s atomic memorabilia enthusiasts. Creepy and educational. Has anyone here ever heard of M.Philip Copp?
posted by Peter H on May 19, 2003 - 10 comments

Walton Ford

Walton Ford, 1,2,3: Nature Boy.
posted by hama7 on May 7, 2003 - 13 comments

Halfbakery illustrators

We've all seen the HalfBakery. But, can someone please help me understand the multitude of absolutely amazing galleries of illustrations of halfbakery ideas as well as some other individual contributions.
posted by slacy on May 2, 2003 - 2 comments

To reach this speed, curves must be abolished

Train Oddities & Curiosities features stunning illustrations and articles from late 19th/early 20th century science magazines. Read about the Chase-Kirchner Aerodromic Railroad, the beautiful Meigs Elevated Railway, or the history of the "Rainmaking" car. Be sure to check out the other sections for more fascinating train lore.
posted by snez on Apr 19, 2003 - 6 comments

Design, illustration and visual story telling

The Visual Telling of Stories Archive is a database used to train illustrators and designers. It's a deep, rich resource spanning centuries, and a very fun site to explore. I enjoyed puzzle pictures, the section on poses which includes a wife's grateful gestures and the Neapolitan language of gestures, a group of woodcuts of Boccacio's women from 1473, the hidden language of sex, and far too many other things to cite.
posted by madamjujujive on Apr 18, 2003 - 13 comments

Soviet Children's Books and more

Children's books of the Early Soviet Era [more]
posted by hama7 on Apr 9, 2003 - 11 comments

The future we were promised.

An exhibit of the art of Radebaugh and what the future looked like from the 50's. "The post-World War II optimism that pervaded the nation extended to the not-too-distant future, with its promise of spaceship-traveled skyways whirring in a utopia of streamlined cityscapes. Now, the works of A.C. Radebaugh -- a top illustrator of the day whose works helped define that future-vision -- are being shown in a retrospective at a quirky art gallery obsessed with Americana of the mid-20th century."
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Mar 31, 2003 - 1 comment

surreality: the art of Naoto Hattori

Reality is beginning to seem more and more like Naoto Hattori's surreality; check the gallery and see if you agree. ("Money, Blunts, 40's And Bitches" just amuses me hugely - I think it's the "bitches".) I particularly like the "Extras" section, in which he reveals a bit of the process behind the paintings. (Plus, snowboards!)
posted by taz on Mar 28, 2003 - 10 comments

Pop culture meets the masters

Highbrow meets lowbrow - Isabel Samaras uses classic paintings as a springboard to portray the secret lives of pop culture icons like the Addams Family, the cast of Gilligan's Island, Batman & Robin and Tattoo. Fun but NSFW stuff. Check out her portfolio of illustrations too.
posted by madamjujujive on Mar 11, 2003 - 11 comments

Weekend Frippery

Love or fight is a little animation by Boris Hoppek, and while visiting, don't miss his bimbo sculptures. Then, take a quick spin over to Noodle Town to meet the residents. And if you haven't yet overdosed on cute, visit the 10 second flash animations at itching hands...these quirky little primitives and stick figures seem to be quite the rage among illustrators.
posted by madamjujujive on Jan 25, 2003 - 5 comments

Funky Radical World

Funky Radical World was created by Japanese illustrator Radical Suzuki - don't miss the delightful fashion show. One of my favorite works is Real Tokyo Girls, a flash animation about the rather fascinating Ganguro girl fad. This gallery includes a few more samples of his work. warning - some cartoon nudity may be involved!
posted by madamjujujive on Jan 18, 2003 - 15 comments

The Art of Lesbian Pulp Fiction

Angie was a marked woman, paying her own ransom with a body none could resist.
Someone has spent an incredible amount of time and energy scanning in lesbian pulp fiction covers from the 50's and 60's. An interesting look into what was considered titillating 40 years ago.
posted by patrickje on Jan 8, 2003 - 21 comments

Meet J.C. Leyendecker, American illustrator

Meet J. C. Leyendecker, the Golden Boy of American Illustration. He helped codify the modern image of Santa Claus. His Baby New Year covers for the Saturday Evening Post invented a pop culture icon. He was "the most out front closeted gay man of the twentieth century" - a hugely popular artist whose work was often clearly homoerotic. The young Norman Rockwell used to stalk him and once said, "Leyendecker was my god." In 1905, he created advertising's first male sex symbol, the Arrow Shirt Man, which "defined the ideal American male" for decades, got more fan mail than Valentino and inspired a 1923 Broadway play. A detailed, opinionated biography and 14 pages of gorgeous Post covers.
posted by mediareport on Dec 21, 2002 - 5 comments

Dinosaurs - Your One Stop Internet Resource

Aiee!!    Pelorosaurus by god knows who, Corythosaurus illustrated by Zdenek Burian, Ornitholestes by Charles Knight--Dinosaur Illustrations has led me to two wonderful sites: Early Image and Paper Dinosaurs, 1824-1969 - An Exhibition of Original Publications From the Collections of the Linda Hall Library, as well as many other little treasures.
posted by y2karl on Nov 22, 2002 - 3 comments

Aspects of the Victorian Book

Aspects of the Victorian Book is a Sunday morning kind of site, a relaxed but vivid tour of 19th century British publishing that explores production techniques such as lithography, binding and illustration, and looks at the printed works of the period (including forms such as the inexpensive "Yellowbacks" and their cousins, the usually lurid "Penny Dreadfuls").
posted by taz on Nov 17, 2002 - 6 comments

The Smithsonian offers an online sampling of its Collection of Aeronautic Sheet Music. From the introduction: "...widespread fascination with flight has inspired an enormous output of historical drawings, paintings, advertisements and illustrations for publications. Some of the most colorful illustrations are those which adorn sheet music. In the Bella Landauer collection, you can find illustrations that range from the bizarre to the commonplace, from the humorous to the mundane. But most are colorful and interesting."
The collection is divided into categories such as "Ballooning", "Biplanes", and "Flying Machines". I love this one from 1914, called "A Hundred Years From Now".
posted by taz on Nov 12, 2002 - 9 comments

You probably remember him best for his famous green devil, tempting you with the esoteric delight of evil absinthe*, or the familiar image of the jester pushing the pleasures of Bitter Campari. Called by some the "father of the modern poster", and even the "father of advertising", Italian-born Leonetto Cappiello created over 1,000 memorable posters during his 40-year career in belle-epoque and fin-de-siecle Paris, and a quick look at a collection of his work quickly reminds us how enduring both his images and his basic concepts have been. (more...)
posted by taz on Nov 4, 2002 - 15 comments

Loopland

Loopland - fun and stylish site of Allan Sanders, freelance London-based illustrator. Visit his portfolio of client work, personal sketches and quirky little flash films (I like 06.01). Among his notable work, he was recently commissioned by Studio AKA to design & build the fun, interactive Campus FIFA for the official FIFA World Cup website. (but you know those damn designers - sites may contain flash and launch new windows)
posted by madamjujujive on Nov 3, 2002 - 10 comments

Distinctive Science Fiction Illustrator and Cover Artist Richard Powers

Richard Powers - His sleek surreal and otherworldly abstractions changed science fiction illustration and, in the process, the stature of science fiction itself. Here is the Richard Powers Catalog from Vandewater Books. From the e-zine Strange Words Archive, comes The Powers Years part of Collecting The Ballantine Originals, and check out the thumbnails amid and after the Richard Powers essay at Hedonia--who are the very wave of the future in so many ways at once! David G. Hartwell remembers Powers the man. Here is another from his son in download form from Paper Snarl, where Powers is well regarded. And check out the links at the Richard Powers Cyber Art Gallery - everything from a Goth art gallery to Terence McKenna's Dream Museum. But don't click on Miss Stephanie Locke if you're at work! Oh, and the Strange Worlds archive is worth a gander, too...
posted by y2karl on Oct 21, 2002 - 10 comments

La Speranza

La Speranza - take a surrealistic Sunday stroll through Viennese artist Luigi La Speranza's gallery of illustrations, watercolors, paintings and sculptures.
posted by madamjujujive on Oct 20, 2002 - 7 comments

The writing isn't the only great thing about Roald Dahl's books. There's also his fantastic illustrator, the perfectly-matched Quentin Blake. He's best known for illustrating such Dahl books as Matilda, The BFG, and The Witches. A comprehensive bibliography can be found here, his books in print can be ordered here, and, if you can afford it, buy some prints.
posted by interrobang on Sep 4, 2002 - 30 comments

Like Tintin, Asterix, or even the Smurfs? Step right this way, to the dark, spooky side of French cartooning. Jacques Tardi, relatively obscure in this country, brings you many lovely lonely images of cityscapes and small horrors, mostly within the amazing stories of Adele Blanc-Sec, writer and adventurer. At least one of his books is still in print in English, and most can be ordered from overseas, and are well worth it.
posted by interrobang on Aug 27, 2002 - 23 comments

The Art of M. Wartella.

The Art of M. Wartella. His work has been featured on magazine covers and other indie zines. Follow the adventures of Dinky Dog (QT recommended) created by "November Jones, the poor Hungarian surplus lard salesman who invented the "Dinky Dog" character in 1914." Or "Make a hacker out of a slacker".
posted by KevinSkomsvold on Jun 21, 2002 - 5 comments

The Umbrella Sail at Last a Reality!

The Umbrella Sail at Last a Reality! Technofetishists will love this fabulous collection of Popular Mechanics covers going back to 1902. Who'd have thought a weaving machine could be so beautiful? Futuristic cityscapes, bizarre weapons, new-fangled sports and surprisingly delicate and artful scenes are just a few of the pleasures in the year-by-year archive. The mag's male-dominated world can get kind of, um, gay, but it's hard to imagine a better display of the joys and fears (especially the fears) of our monkey fascination with technology.
posted by mediareport on Jun 17, 2002 - 40 comments

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