609 posts tagged with Illustration.
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mcbess: cartoon art of bearded men, busty women, and some dead pirates

Welcome to mcbess, a land of odd illustrations in black and white*, something of a dark and dingy take on Merry Melodies, where the men are bearded, and the ladies are toothy, busty (and often topless, in a vaguely NSFW cartoony way). There are also some large-scale illustrations with all those elements, and more. Matthieu Bessudo, aka mcbess, is also in a band, The Dead Pirates, and his art and music met with the video Wood (Vimeo; also on YouTube; more info here). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 28, 2013 - 8 comments

A Knee Story

On surgery and healing, illustrated on Post-it notes
posted by rockindata on Jan 27, 2013 - 11 comments

See Monkeys

Thousands of illustrations and photographs for all your primate picture needs. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 18, 2013 - 2 comments

Mother Goose gone Addams

The Charles Addams Mother Goose
Three blind mice, see how they run!
They all ran after the farmer’s wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife.
Did you ever see such a sight in your life
As three blind mice?
Charles Addams, longtime New Yorker cartoonist illustrates the nursery rhymes of Mother Goose.
posted by caddis on Jan 8, 2013 - 16 comments

THE BOSOM BUDDIES OF WASTE

“During the 1920s, the British firm Parker-Holladay created a fictional character named Bill Jones. Mr. Jones’ dispensed his friendly advice to British clerical workers through colorful lithographic posters emblazoned with his get-right-to-the-point maxims." Why not enjoy this collection of can-do, yes-sir business motivational posters before you head back to work?
posted by The Whelk on Jan 1, 2013 - 40 comments

"There’s a lack of pretentiousness to the word ‘comic book’ that I think suits the medium itself very, very nicely."

The NYT Book Review just named it one of the 5 best fiction books of the year. The AV Club helpfully posted a video to show you what happens when you open it. Actually, lots of folks posted videos to show you what happens when you open it. Other folks raved in print about the author and his career. The Comics Journal asked a dozen critics of the author's work to send in reviews; this one focuses on the role of disability in the narrative. This one notes the book "is in a very primary sense a comic about women and the private lives they lead, and it investigates more fully than any other comic I have ever read the way they age, fall in love, explore their sexuality, come to terms with compromises they’ve had to make as they’ve grown, accept their limitations, confront squandered ability, have children (or choose not to have children), marry (or stay single), and make sense of the world around them." You might find Chris Ware's Building Stories worth a look or two. Or fourteen. [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Dec 19, 2012 - 28 comments

...and they were separated.

Eleanor Davis watched some friends skin a roadkill'd fox, and illustrated the process.
posted by curious nu on Dec 18, 2012 - 27 comments

Jeff Victor Redux

The Evolution Series, by artist and animator Jeff Victor. (Previously) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 14, 2012 - 3 comments

Pen & Oink

Pen & Oink Pen & Oink is a blog featuring modern and classic picture books, and interviews with children's book illustrators-- including lots of great images of their work and process. And there's some awesome doodles of pigs. [via mefi projects]
posted by moonmilk on Dec 13, 2012 - 3 comments

Lettering vs Calligraphy

Lettering vs Calligraphy: an epic battle you decide. [more inside]
posted by Sailormom on Dec 13, 2012 - 12 comments

Girls: Fact or Fiction

Girls: Fact + Fiction Gallery (some images MNSFW)
posted by ColdChef on Dec 11, 2012 - 29 comments

Jeffrey Beebe's Refractoria

Over the last fifteen years, I have created the world of Refractoria, a comprehensive imagino-ordinary world that is equal parts autobiography and pure fantasy. - Jeffrey Beebe [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Nov 27, 2012 - 11 comments

The Mico / Тхе Мичо

Mihajlo Dimitrovski (The Mico / Тхе Мичо on deviantArt, Facebook, Blogspot) is an artist most famous for his fanart, and he's got some great A Song Of Ice And Fire illustrations (and others!). [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 15, 2012 - 5 comments

Farmer's Dilemma

"Farmer's Dilemma" is a short, sad and beautiful comic about family and acceptance. From Sam Alden's art blog, GINGERLAND.
posted by teraflop on Nov 14, 2012 - 13 comments

"Unbelievable. Do you recognize those uniforms?"

Artist Dusty Abell has created a massive poster featuring "at least one, sometimes more, character, entity, starship or structure from every episode of [Star Trek: The Original] series." Via io9, who ask: How many characters can you name? Stumped? Here's a key of all 123! [more inside]
posted by zarq on Oct 21, 2012 - 25 comments

Fevk-ül Adâlet

Berk Senturk presents "Ottoman was Geeky", a collection of reinterpreted pop culture characters.
posted by griphus on Oct 13, 2012 - 8 comments

Damn, I wish I thought of that.

The Jealous Curator is 'a collection of art that inspires & depresses' its proprietor, who has been updating the site almost daily since February 2009 with series of paintings, sculpture and mixed media, furniture, and always with light-hearted commentary about what's posted.
posted by shakespeherian on Oct 10, 2012 - 8 comments

A gallery of litigations that could have been

Imagine you're a game producer in the late 1980s, a week before the deadline and you still haven't got a cover for your game. Exhausted from crunchtime, you tell your illustrator to just rip off some Schwarzenegger action movie to get the job done. Careful, your subordinate might take the order all too literally!
Hardcore Gaming 101 present Tracing the Influence - Stolen Images in Games: Schwarzenegger and Stallone, Illustrators and Painters, Other Boxart and Ads, Ingame Graphics pt. I, Ingame Graphics pt. II.
posted by griphus on Oct 10, 2012 - 24 comments

The other E. H. Shepard

Though virtually synonymous with his images for Winnie-the-Pooh and The Wind in the Willows, Ernest Howard Shepard (1879-1976) was one of the most consistent and wide-ranging illustrators of the twentieth century.
posted by curious nu on Oct 5, 2012 - 6 comments

Romance novel cover illustration

Romance novel covers are a frequent subject of ridicule. But they have also featured highly talented illustrators like Alan Ayers, Pino Daeni, Elaine Gignilliat, Phil Heffernan, and Albert Slark. [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Sep 30, 2012 - 13 comments

The World of C86

The World of C86 showcases the bright, abstracted artwork of Matt Lyon. [more inside]
posted by Mizu on Sep 25, 2012 - 12 comments

Second Person Feline

"You are a cat. You don’t know your name, or where you are, or how you got there. You are sitting on a pile of clothes that smell familiar, and the room around you is quiet and dark." So begins A Stray In The Woods, an online collaborate comic/illustrated interactive fiction about being an amnesic cat. Take control of the story by suggesting things for the cat to do. [via mefi projects]
posted by The Whelk on Sep 24, 2012 - 32 comments

Life on Pluto - Details on Page 97.

What lives where in the Solar System. Fantastic Adventure covers from 1939/40 depicting the kind of lifeforms they think each planet can support. [more inside]
posted by marienbad on Sep 20, 2012 - 63 comments

Empire State of Pen

Empire State of Pen — 80 second timelapse video of artist Patrick Vale drawing the view of the Manhattan skyline from the Empire State Building.
posted by netbros on Sep 13, 2012 - 9 comments

The picture letters of Beatrix Potter

In [a series of notes to Noel Moore, the oft-sickly son of her former governess], Potter punctuates her words with small, sweet illustrations: 'I have come a very long way in a puff-puff …' (next to a train), a straightforward, 'Here are some rabbits throwing snow balls,' and, of course, Peter’s debut in a special dispatch from 1893. - Beatrix Potter’s Picture Letters, The Birthplace Of Peter Rabbit [more inside]
posted by SugarAndSass on Sep 10, 2012 - 4 comments

Ukiyo-e Heroes

Illustrator Jed Henry and woodblock printmaker David Bull recently collaborated on a set of videogame-inspired woodblock prints in the ukiyo-e style. Just recently funded through Kickstarter, the prints are already underway. There are videos of the creative process here and at the bottom of the first link.
posted by gilrain on Aug 31, 2012 - 53 comments

Illustrated Aesop's Fables through history

Historical versions of Aesop's fables - text and pictures - collected by Laura Gibbs. She gives thousands of historic texts in English, Latin, and Greek, but even better, has Flickr sets of the historic illustrations (that page is sorted by artist) from editions by Rackham, Caldecott, and other artists going back to the 1400s. [more inside]
posted by LobsterMitten on Aug 30, 2012 - 11 comments

Monday Wednesday Friday

Dog House Diaries — we know that web-comics are where all the money and fame is at and we want a piece. It was obvious that in order to be successful in this biz, you need to be good with humor, drawing, math and computers. Well we kick some serious butt at drawing and math so we figured 2 out of 3 wasn’t bad.
posted by netbros on Aug 16, 2012 - 24 comments

Books, book bindings, and the death of the book

Ever since something was invented to replace it, people have been predicting the end of the book: The Death Of The Book Through The Ages [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 15, 2012 - 60 comments

Fearing cacodemonomania from jettatura, the acersecomic leptosome set off a biblioclasm of his scripturient neogenesis on ktenology, unwittingly bringing about hamartia.

The Project Twins have created bold illustrative posters of unusual words from A to Z. (via)
posted by divabat on Jul 25, 2012 - 19 comments

You eat too fast, and I understand why your antidyspeptic pill-makers cover your walls, your forests even, with their advertisements.

In 1891 author and lecturer ”Max O’Rell” (being the pen name of one Léon Paul Blouet) published an amusing account of his travels through the States and Eastern Canada - "A Frenchman In America" - that, along with the charming illustrations, reflect on then popular national stereotypes and character and is presented on Project Gutenberg in its entirely. (via)
posted by The Whelk on Jul 7, 2012 - 16 comments

The thing with feathers

America's other Audubon.
posted by latkes on Jun 28, 2012 - 17 comments

Sorry

I Can't Apologize Enough is an ongoing series of small mixed media drawings by David Fullarton. [more inside]
posted by xod on Jun 26, 2012 - 12 comments

Chéri Herouard and La Vie parisienne

Two Flickr sets of 295 illustrations and 103 illustrations each (plus three more illustrations), by French artist Chéri Herouard who is most famous for his work for "naughty French magazine" La Vie parisienne from 1907 to his death. You can find some high quality scans from La Vie parisienne and more information about the magazine at Darwination Scans. Quite a few of the images are not safe for work. [via Kate Beaton]
posted by Kattullus on Jun 23, 2012 - 13 comments

A visual history of evolution

Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution Trees of Life: A Visual History of Evolution catalogs 230 tree-like branching diagrams, culled from 450 years of mankind’s visual curiosity about the living world and our quest to understand the complex ecosystem we share with other organisms, from bacteria to birds, microbes to mammals. (More trees are visible at the Google Books site.)
posted by OmieWise on May 31, 2012 - 4 comments

Leo Dillon 1933 - 2012

Book illustrator Leo Dillon, who in partnership with his wife Diane Dillon, illustrated and did the covers for many of your favourite childrens' books, has passed away on May 26th. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on May 29, 2012 - 18 comments

Batman as a Founding Father would answer a lot of questions...

Drawing on money can elevate a humble bill to something a bit more entertaining. [via]
posted by quin on May 29, 2012 - 25 comments

Animalarium

Spider Women. The animal illustration of Eileen Mayo. Book Week. Animals on Bikes. Alphabet Soup 1, Alphabet Soup 2. Steinlen's Cats. Let's Dance. Cats in Advertisements. Art Deco Animals. Jacques Hnizdovsky's prints. Emmanuelle Houdart's creatures. Turn of the century bird illustrations. [more inside]
posted by Lou Stuells on May 23, 2012 - 4 comments

La photo, le dessin, les deux à la fois. mais pas tout le temps.

Sarah Esteje does amazing ballpoint pen and pencil illustrations of animals. [more inside]
posted by quin on May 21, 2012 - 14 comments

Illustrations that made Edgar Allan Poe’s stories even more horrifying

In 1919, everyone wanted a copy of the deluxe edition of Edgar Allan Poe's Tales of Mystery and Imagination, but not because it was bound in vellum with real gold lettering. It was because of these grim and gorgeous illustrations by Harry Clarke, which added an extra dose of horror to Poe's already terrifying tales. Tales of Mystery and Imagination, which collects many of Poe's most enduring horror stories, including "The Masque Of The Red Death," "The Pit And The Pendulum," "The Telltale Heart," and "The Fall Of The House Of Usher," was actually first collected and published in 1908, nearly 60 years after Poe's death. This edition was published by George Harrap & Co., and included 24-full page illustrations by Clarke. Even though the volume cost five guineas (somewhere in the neighborhood of $300 US), it was much in demand and made Clarke's reputation as an illustrator. It's easy to see why, with these gorgeous renditions of often gruesome subjects. See all 24 illustrations here.
posted by Lou Stuells on May 10, 2012 - 36 comments

Blown Covers

Blown Covers is a blog by New Yorker art editor Françoise Mouly and her daughter Nadja Spiegelman, who is an editor and comics creator herself. The blog focuses on The New Yorker but today has been Maurice Sendak themed with a short comic by Art Spiegelman and Sendak about a conversation they had, a Sendak New Yorker cover, a short Sendak comic called Cereal Baby Keller and an even shorter Sendak comic.
posted by Kattullus on May 8, 2012 - 14 comments

the unspeakable, in ink on post-its

What if Edward Gorey illustrated Lovecraft? It'd look like John Kenn Mortensen's work, that's what. Except Mortensen makes his art in his spare time, on post-it notes. He has an art book.
posted by Lou Stuells on May 4, 2012 - 39 comments

This Adventurous and Terrifying World, with James W. Buel

James William Buel was a journalist, author, and editor, who was born in 1849 in Golconda, Illinois, and died in 1920 in San Diego, California. In his life, he traveled the world, writing and illustrating adventure tales about the wilds of Africa and the American West, and other exciting parts of the world. Many of his books are on Archive.org, ranging from America's Wonderlands, as delineated by pen and camera and Mysteries and Miseries of America's Great Cities, embracing New York, Washington City, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and New Orleans; to Russian Nihilism and Exile Life in Siberia, with over 200 splendid engravings, and Sea and Land [microform] : an illustrated history of the wonderful and curious things of nature existing before and since the deluge (including a great number of creatures who apparently found joy in terrorizing and devouring people).
posted by filthy light thief on May 3, 2012 - 1 comment

Zen Pencils

Zen Pencils is a blog with a pretty simple premise: take inspirational quotes and set them to comics. It's only a few months old but there are already a bunch of greats within: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Carl Sagan, Albert Einstein, and more in the archives.
posted by mathowie on May 2, 2012 - 33 comments

Blown Covers

New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant To See
posted by TangerineGurl on Apr 26, 2012 - 24 comments

irkafirka illustrates tweets.

@irkafirka illustrates tweets. Illustrator Nick Hilditch (@Pockless) makes cute little cartoons out of selected twitter posts. Also available on twitter, of course.
posted by moonmilk on Apr 24, 2012 - 5 comments

A Motion Comic

The Art of Pho by award-winning British illustrator and animator Julian Hanshaw is a moving and surreal story in interactive animation about a creature named Little Blue and his relationship with Ho Chi Minh City. In Vietnam's bustling capital Little Blue learns to master the art of making Pho - Vietnam's ubiquitous national noodle dish. [more inside]
posted by netbros on Apr 16, 2012 - 11 comments

"We put the animate in the inanimate."

Cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt visits Toy Fair.
posted by Faint of Butt on Apr 4, 2012 - 21 comments

Moving pictures

Stereographic drawings from Dain Fagerholm.
posted by unliteral on Mar 19, 2012 - 21 comments

Exquisite Beast: illustrating evolution

Exquisite Beast is a tag-team tumblr, featuring an illustrated evolution that started with this little beastie, drawn by Evan Dahm (Rice Boy comics | Making Places worldbuilding blog). The next evolution was by Yuko Ota (Johnny Wander comic | forthcoming Lucky Penny comic), the other half of this illustrious duo. But their creature does not have a simple linear evolution chart, as seen in this cladogram showing the various fan-made offshoots. Some are linked from the Exquisite Beast posts, but you can find more from the Exquisite Beast tumblr tag.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 13, 2012 - 7 comments

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