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576 posts tagged with Illustration.
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He's Hipp!

As Khoi Vinh describes them, "Dan Hipp’s extraordinarily lively illustrations are borne of some mash-up universe in which comics, sci-fi and action-adventure fiction have both been flipped over on their backs, only to reveal their shockingly adorable undersides." via Subtraction [more inside]
posted by ocherdraco on Aug 24, 2011 - 17 comments

The Near-Sighted Monkey

Lynda Barry, cartoonist and author of One! Hundred! Demons! has a lovely art tumblr.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 24, 2011 - 44 comments

Famous Lives in Minimalist Pictogram Flowcharts

Famous Lives in Minimalist Pictogram Flowcharts: From Darth Vader to Jesus by Maria Popova.
posted by nickyskye on Aug 22, 2011 - 24 comments

The pop culture art of Phil Noto

Phil Noto illustrates the hell out of comics, TV, pulp fiction, music, and being a six year old artist at his blog, Your Nice New Outfit. Oh shit it's the Master Blaster!
posted by cortex on Aug 19, 2011 - 19 comments

Can You Find His Shiny Metal Ass?

Where's Wall-E? [more inside]
posted by Mike Mongo on Aug 18, 2011 - 170 comments

Comics by Anne Emond

Comiques is a comic about "life's little trivialities" by Anne Emond. Her main subjects are her family, cat, friends, New York City and random musings. It is mostly drawn from life though her work sometimes tends towards the fantastic. Here is a short video interview with her which also features some candid shots of her cat and here's a longer interview on more technical matters. Finally, here are some random favorites: Pug, Celebrity Look-alike Generator, Irrational Rage Comic, Umbrella, Writing a Detective Story?, The Best Karamazov, Ode to the Avocado, Top of the Morning to You and The Day I Realized I've Never Tried to Dress My Cat in People Clothes.
posted by Kattullus on Aug 5, 2011 - 15 comments

Forty Fords

To celebrate Harrison Ford's 40th credited big-screen appearance in Cowboys & Aliens this weekend, Steve Murray takes a look back at everyone's favourite acting chameleon.
posted by sweetkid on Jul 29, 2011 - 94 comments

Rescuing Books From Obscurity

Sifting through The Staxx you'll find excerpts from ancient books about British chimneysweeps, ferns and mosses, Japanese art motifs, ornamental alphabets, and much more.
posted by hermitosis on Jul 28, 2011 - 6 comments

Delilah Dirk and the Turkish Lieutenant - a graphic novel, serialized online

Join MetaFilter's own TangoCharlie (Tony Cliff) for an illustrated adventure of swordplay and wordplay set in Turkey in the 1800s, in Delilah Dirk and the Turkish Lieutenant (updated on Saturday mornings with four to six new pages). What is currently a full-color serialized graphic novel in four chapters started as a short self-published greyscale comic, which was nominated for an Eisner Award in 2008. As a bonus, Tony shares tips and lessons learned in the making of Delilah Dirk on his blog. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 22, 2011 - 16 comments

Some Nice Background Music

The Illuminated Mixtapes — a running series of playlists for streaming, with hand illustrated covers for each one. Some nice background music while enjoying your MeFi.
posted by netbros on Jul 8, 2011 - 14 comments

Vintage Printable

Vintage Printable provides vintage images in the public domain for download or printing.
posted by lalex on Jul 5, 2011 - 15 comments

I liked Aragorn before he was king.

The Broship of the Ring -- The Lord of the Rings envisioned as a buddy/road trip hipster epic. From illustrator Noelle Stevenson.
posted by seanmpuckett on Jul 3, 2011 - 69 comments

I'm Gonna Make a Thing

Hobo Lobo of Hamelin is a thing by a dude, who’s all like, “I’m Gonna Make a Thing.” And then he did. Or is doing. Or, you know, whatever. This dude can be found on the internet. He websites to put food on his family. A wonderfully crafted and designed illustrated book for the digital age.
posted by netbros on Jul 2, 2011 - 26 comments

Illustrated recipes

Do you find yourself envious of the perfectly staged photos accompanying recipes? Are your drawing skills better than your culinary skills? Recipe Look is a collection of user-submitted illustrated recipes, some with pictures fit for a magazine, others a bit more casual. See also: Drawn Butter, an illustrated recipe blog (via Johnny Wander's Ecto-Cooler Smoothie); Pictoral Recipes from Oregon State University (in English and Spanish); and two recipes from comic artist Lucy Knisley (via; Knisley prev, prev).
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 1, 2011 - 5 comments

Your Glory Days are Over, Mr. Cthulhu

Your Glory Days Are Over, Mr. Cthulhu. "Mr Cthulhu tries to interest himself in his sons dance, but mr Cthulhus has lived a sheltered life, the intricacies of modern ballet passes him right by." (by Mattias Adolfsson, previously)
posted by OmieWise on Jun 23, 2011 - 22 comments

There is no number 63

OSHA's 1984 Fatal Facts report comes illustrated with surprisingly sangfroid cartoons of workplace accidents.
posted by The Whelk on Jun 19, 2011 - 99 comments

Shockingly, Aladdin is not a wonderland of historical accuracy

Shoomlah illustrates Disney Princess in historically accurate costumes, givs explanations for her choices, and shows us her process. [more inside]
posted by The Whelk on Jun 17, 2011 - 55 comments

Anya's Ghost

Vera Brosgol (previously) is a Russian-born artist and illustrator now based in the US. One of her early works, Return To Sender, remains unfinished. Her first graphic novel Anya’s Ghost (preview) about a girl who finds a ghost at the bottom of a well has just been published.
posted by panboi on Jun 17, 2011 - 9 comments

Writing and drawing, that is your calling

Incidental Comics — Cartoons about... just stuff.
posted by netbros on Jun 9, 2011 - 9 comments

The Cartoon Guide to Life, the Universe, and Everything

Larry Gonick is a veteran American cartoonist best known for his delightful comic-book guides to science and history, many of which have previews online. Chief among them is his long-running Cartoon History of the Universe (later The Cartoon History of the Modern World), a sprawling multi-volume opus documenting everything from the Big Bang to the Bush administration. Published over the course of three decades, it takes a truly global view -- its time-traveling Professor thoroughly explores not only familiar topics like Rome and World War II but the oft-neglected stories of Asia and Africa, blending caricature and myth with careful scholarship (cited by fun illustrated bibliographies) and tackling even the most obscure events with intelligence and wit. This savvy satire carried over to Gonick's Zinn-by-way-of-Pogo chronicle The Cartoon History of the United States, along with a bevy of Cartoon Guides to other topics, including Genetics, Computer Science, Chemistry, Physics, Statistics, The Environment, and (yes!) Sex. Gonick has also maintained a few sideprojects, such as a webcomic look at Chinese invention, assorted math comics (previously), the Muse magazine mainstay Kokopelli & Co. (featuring the shenanigans of his "New Muses"), and more. See also these lengthy interview snippets, linked previously. Want more? Amazon links to the complete oeuvre inside! [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Jun 6, 2011 - 29 comments

Huh.

HUH. Magazine is a media platform with the latest, most relevant news from the worlds of art, fashion, design, music and film. Recent features include: Harvest by Haroshi: Skate and Destroy, artworks created with old worn, or snapped, skateboard decks | Disassembly, capturing relics of our past in a unique, dismantled and exposed form | Murakami at Versailles, knee-deep in controversy since its inception | and Darren's Great Big Camera, a short documentary about a camera that shoots on 14" x 36" negatives and measures 6ft. in length.
posted by netbros on Jun 1, 2011 - 8 comments

Scientific Illustration

Scientific Illustration is a Tumblr blog devoted to... well... scientific illustration.
posted by brundlefly on May 20, 2011 - 14 comments

Meanwhile, The San Francisco Public Library

Wendy MacNaughton's Meanwhile Illustrated Documentary Series has so far covered San Francisco dog walkers, Farmers' Market Farmers, Mission Bar Tenders etc. This week she captures the essence of libraries in Meanwhile, The San Francisco Library
posted by honey-barbara on May 16, 2011 - 15 comments

Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak! Thank you!

The First Four (Harry Potter) Books: Illustrated by Lucy Knisley [Previously] Contains Spoilers
posted by Fizz on May 12, 2011 - 20 comments

Girls! Girls! Girls!

Vintage Sleaze: Exploitation and enticement in the form of drawings, comics, and pinups.
posted by hermitosis on May 7, 2011 - 3 comments

The Wonder of God in Nature

Die Wunder Gottes in der Natur (1744) illustrates astronomical, meteorological, geological, spiritual, and psychological visions, based on the work of 16th century Alsatian encyclopedist Conrad Lycosthenes.

The cover and title page.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on May 5, 2011 - 7 comments

Ultra Local Geography

Ultra Local Geography documents the everyday architecture of Chicago with detailed drawings and neighborhood historical research. [more inside]
posted by enn on May 4, 2011 - 12 comments

The Illustrated Hobbitses

Hobbitish is a site that collects the various cover and interior paintings and illustrations of The Hobbit from versions around the world. [more inside]
posted by curious nu on May 2, 2011 - 21 comments

Drawing Conan O'Brien

Funny Bones -- Anatomy of a Celebrity Caricature. Artist John Kascht looks for the unique character in Conan O'Brien's face and body. And hair. (Half-hour video)
posted by TimTypeZed on Apr 26, 2011 - 10 comments

Portraits of Iraqis by Daniel Heyman

I am an artist who by a stroke of good fortune met a brave American lawyer who represents several hundred Iraqi detainees in the US federal courts....the Iraqis I interviewed, released by the American military after many months or years of detention, were never formally accused of a crime, brought to a trial or given legal representation. Daniel Heyman paints and draws while sitting in on interviews between former Abu Ghraib detainees and their lawyer Susan Burke. Interview (including Heyman's thoughts about Errol Morris' documentary Standard Operating Procedure). Review. Another gallery. Related: The Detainee Project. Via zunguzungu. [more inside]
posted by mediareport on Apr 24, 2011 - 5 comments

Dark Art by Anton Semenov

The disturbing yet beautifully illustrated world of Anton Semenov. [more inside]
posted by Gator on Apr 18, 2011 - 8 comments

The Zoopreme Court is much cuter than the Supreme Court

Zoopreme Court Ever wanted to remember all the justices of the Supreme Court, past and present? Well it's a whole lot easier if they are animals. Dan Schofield and Alice DuBois are illustrating all 112 justices as various critters, as well as several landmark cases.
posted by melissam on Apr 14, 2011 - 17 comments

She made pictures of haunting loveliness.

19 year-old Virginia Frances Sterrett was commissioned by the Penn Publishing Company to illustrate Old French Fairy Tales by Comtesse de Segur (1920). Sterrett was already ill with tuberculosis, the disease that would end her life at age 30. [more inside]
posted by nev on Apr 9, 2011 - 26 comments

Peeling back the layers.

Animated Anatomies is a new exhibition from Duke University Special Collections that examines the beautiful intricacies of anatomical flap books. [more inside]
posted by Horace Rumpole on Apr 3, 2011 - 7 comments

Gianmarco Magnani illustration: Silence Television

Gianmarco Magnani draws girls, guitars and motorcycles.
posted by Tom-B on Apr 2, 2011 - 25 comments

IT'S GENDER-MUTABLE FRIDAY Y'ALL

Rule 63: "There is always a female version of a male character" (and vice versa). NSFW. Not even close to safe for work. Some helpful examples: lady Predator. Boy Lilith (from Darkstalkers). Sonic the Hedgehog's Tails, but as a woman version of Tails, watching television in bed, and being sold products related to a good health.
posted by Greg Nog on Apr 1, 2011 - 47 comments

A History of Skeletal Drawings

A History of Skeletal Drawings: Part 1 - pre-20th century, Part 2 - Bone Wars to the 1950's, Part 3 - Dino Renaissance to the present. Via Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs.
posted by brundlefly on Mar 28, 2011 - 11 comments

Chris Ware Interview

An interview with Chris Ware from May 2010 at the international Copenhagen comics festival. Ware is the creator of Acme Novelty Library and Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. (via kottke) Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4
posted by BitterOldPunk on Mar 22, 2011 - 9 comments

Muppet Museum of Natural History

Bill Mudron's Color Cornucopia
posted by OverlappingElvis on Mar 18, 2011 - 7 comments

Leg Godt!

Jim Hughes loves illustration and graphic design, as witness his gorgeous and eclectic blog Codex xcix. He also loves Lego, as you can tell from his delightfully detailed Brick Fetish site. His newest blog post combines these two loves into Lego: A Natural History of Package Design. [more inside]
posted by Horace Rumpole on Mar 10, 2011 - 7 comments

Sick Ink

Tokyo artist Sagaki Keita creates incredibly detailed illustrations which are almost completely improvised. More of his work can be found on his website.
posted by gman on Mar 10, 2011 - 18 comments

That Other Kind of Panelling

Powerful Panels. Kirby Panels. 50 Monday Panels. Art of Archie Panels. Panels Repaneled. [more inside]
posted by Alvy Ampersand on Mar 2, 2011 - 9 comments

From Blacksburg to Libya

Virginia Tech geography Professor John Boyer has already enjoyed local notoriety for his comic book styled super hero alter-ego The Plaid Avenger. His 2006 text book raised controversy for including cocktail recipes along with a bombastic writing style and caricatures of world leaders illustrated by Klaus Shmidheiser, an alumi. This week their collaborative effort received the ultimate compliment— Libyan protestors have used Klaus' image of Gadhafi in signs and effigies. Here's a video interview.
posted by fontophilic on Feb 25, 2011 - 9 comments

Lost in the information

John Jerome O'Connor produces infographics of a different sort. Subjects include; obesity and binge drinking by US state; cultural differences regarding personal space; the lottery; earthquakes and wars; offensive words on TV; differences between predicted and actual temperatures; and itches. (via) [more inside]
posted by mrgrimm on Feb 25, 2011 - 14 comments

16: A garden anchored by an ancient avocado

Gaku Nakagawa was born in the temple Zuisenji, Kyoto in 1966. He studied Buddhist art at university and worked as a copywriter after graduation. He is also a monk of the Jyodousyu sect. Since 1996 he has worked as an illustrator, producing images that are described as informal yet truly sophisticated, if similar to some 1950's illustration. His work appears in Monocle's animated 50 Things to Improve the Way You Live (Flash interface), at the Welsh Assembly website: Your Assembly (6mb pdf), and elsewhere like the outside of Heartwood Cafe. He also illustrated a children's book, Ice Cream Once a Year. You can get some of his illustrations in a zip file.
posted by cashman on Feb 11, 2011 - 10 comments

"Find yourself surrounded by the things that support you".

Experience the art of Jerry Pinkney [Artists webpage], a master of the American picturebook whose unforgettable visual narratives reflect deeply felt personal and cultural themes, bearing witness to the African-American experience, the wonders of classic literature, and the wisdom in well-loved folk tales. A belief in the ability of images to speak about and to humanity is at this legendary artist’s core. His artworks celebrating life’s small but extraordinary moments and significant historical events reflect the power of visual storytelling in our lives, “becoming the voice that others may not have had.” His commissioned work, and illustrations are an incredible body of work, but also don't miss his independent creations either. [more inside]
posted by infinite intimation on Feb 6, 2011 - 2 comments

Remember to include the sentence "I blue myself."

Tired of waiting for that Arrested Development movie? Make your own with these Arrested Development paper dolls (courtesy of Kyle Hilton).
posted by Katemonkey on Feb 5, 2011 - 34 comments

What does J.G. Ballard look like? - by Rick Poynor

An examination of the cover design for the published works of J.G. Ballard, spanning five decades. [more inside]
posted by dvorak_beats_qwerty on Feb 4, 2011 - 10 comments

Simply Incredible

Stephen Biesty is an award-winning British illustrator famous for his bestselling "Incredible" series of engineering art books: Incredible Cross-Sections, Incredible Explosions, Incredible Body, and many more. A master draftsman, Biesty does not use computers or even rulers in composing his intricate and imaginative drawings, relying on nothing more than pen and ink, watercolor, and a steady hand. Over the years, he's adapted his work to many other mediums, including pop-up books, educational games (video), interactive history sites, and animation. You can view much of his work in the zoomable galleries on his professional page, or click inside for a full listing of direct links to high-resolution, desktop-quality copies from his and other sites, including several with written commentary from collaborator Richard Platt [site, .mp3 chat]. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Feb 4, 2011 - 24 comments

Iconographie ouvrages anciens

Iconographie ouvrages anciens is a collection of historic animal illustrations that date as far back as the 16th Century, courtesy of the library at Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Lyon. [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jan 26, 2011 - 10 comments

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