217 posts tagged with Ireland.
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Rest in peace, invisible woman

Rest in peace, invisible woman
There is a patriarchal narrative that runs through this entire story, from the act itself to the reporting of it, and we need to allow ourselves to see it if we are to find a way to prevent similar events from happening again.
Linnea Dunne writes about the media coverage of a murder-suicide in Cavan, Ireland. The hashtag #HerNameWasClodagh has a lot more reaction and thoughts.
posted by Fence on Sep 3, 2016 - 8 comments

It works by squashing the strings in all the right places.

Introducing the Chordelia. Tim of the utterly charming WayOutWestBlowinBlog Youtube channel has invented a device to assist in guitar playing for people who find all that chord business "tricky."
posted by emjaybee on Jul 10, 2016 - 29 comments

Letters make nice buildings

Buildings used to be designed less as big blocks and more as complex shapes, even shaped like letters, to minimize the distance to an exterior wall and maximize natural light and ventilation. In fact, in 1773, Johann David Steingruber (Google auto-translation) published Architectonisches Alphabet, or Architectural Alphabet (Archive.org), providing an alphabet (more or less) worth of floor plans. It's in German, so you'll probably skip ahead and start with A. Of course, you can still find plenty of letter-shaped buildings (and write geo-greetings), thanks to the ubiquity of aerial photography.
posted by filthy light thief on May 18, 2016 - 10 comments

If cities are sexed, then Cork is a male place.

Low-sized, disputatious, stoutly built, a hard-to-knock-over type. He has a haughty demeanour that’s perhaps not entirely earned but he can also, in a kinder light, seem princely. He is certainly melancholic. He is given to surreal flights and to an antic humour and he is blessed with pleasingly musical speech patterns. He is usually quite relaxed, and head over heels in love with himself”
posted by Schroder on Apr 21, 2016 - 16 comments

“They have something to say.”

Curious Journey - The 1916 Easter Rising [YouTube] [Documentary] In 1973, Kenneth Griffith, the renowned documentary maker, gathered together a group of veterans of the Irish Rising. Almost half a century after the terrible events they lived through, this highly diverse group - branded terrorists by the British in their youth and now highly respected citizens - gave their own vivid account of what it was like to live through those turbulent times. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 26, 2016 - 22 comments

"I am a woman. I am a feminist. And I am angry."

What is it really like to be a woman in Ireland today? Ahead of International Women’s Day, Louise O’Neill delivers her ‘state of the nation’ address.
posted by billiebee on Mar 5, 2016 - 17 comments

Irish women sawn open during childbirth seek justice

"I felt sick when I signed the paper, when I signed away all my rights. It looked so horrific when it was all there. I can't help but think about the time I was getting a scan and the man said 'You're cut asunder, turn around and I'll show you what they've done to you'. I just didn't want to see it. I knew what happened was so awful." [more inside]
posted by hollyholly on Feb 28, 2016 - 17 comments

Ooh ah, up the RA!

With the upcoming centenary of the Irish 1916 Easter Rising, Limerick's own dole-queue Dadaists the Rubberbandits (previously here , here , and here) present their Guide to 1916. If you're Irish you'll find it hilarious, if you have the misfortune not to be Irish, you'll learn all you need to know about the Rising. And also hopefully find it hilarious.
posted by ironjelly on Feb 21, 2016 - 10 comments

Every year I expect it to be less foolish, and every year it is more so.

RIP Sir Terry Wogan, Irish radio and television presenter whose long career at the BBC included many notable shows including Wake up to Wogan, the Wogan chatshow, Blankety Blank and The Eurovision Song Contest. [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 31, 2016 - 51 comments

Don't make unnecessary journeys

Ireland is having a spot of weather, as Teresa Mannion reports. Her coverage of storm Desmond went instantly viral, earneding a remix from Super Céilí as well as numerous homages. Skip to 1:30 on the main link if you like, but I kind of enjoy the slow burn of it.
posted by Iteki on Dec 6, 2015 - 16 comments

(Sail Away)

"Enya emerges from the shadows wearing a full-length black taffeta dress and a velvet shrug. She’s 54, but she has the skin of someone much younger — or someone who spends most of her time in an Irish castle. She looks like a mix of Deanna Troi and my mom, which is to say, she is the most beautiful woman in the world. She appears, nods as the room applauds her, and disappears without a word. “Now, for a light mingle,” the exec announces." -- Anne Helen Petersen on Enya, her avoidance of celebrity, her history, her massively successful career, and her castles.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 23, 2015 - 68 comments

Tweet it like it is

Abortion in Ireland is illegal with the sole exception of when the mother’s life is in immediate danger. Comedian Gráinne Maguire is using Twitter to focus more attention to the issue by live-tweeting the details of her period to Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny. [more inside]
posted by cynical pinnacle on Nov 8, 2015 - 22 comments

Leaving Queenstown

Irish director Shaun O. Connor's short film Uisce Beatha ('Whiskey / Water Of Life') was researched, written, cast, shot and edited in one month, with a total budget of less than 300 euros. It's a simple tale, based on a true event that happened 100 years ago. [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Nov 1, 2015 - 3 comments

The game they play in heaven

The eighth Rugby World Cup (@) kicks off tomorrow in England (and Wales), contested by twenty qualifying teams. While the All Blacks are unbackable (5/4) favourites to be the first team to retain Bill, the Cup is equally a celebration of the diverse world rugby family, offering the minnows a chance to pit themselves against the best. [more inside]
posted by wilful on Sep 17, 2015 - 76 comments

"Your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride."

If cuisine drives (or helps) you decide your travel plans, USA Today's list of food favorites covers Best Farmers Market, Best Food Trail, Best Food Factory Tour, Best Al Fresco Dining Neighborhood and Best Local Food Scene. All those lists are pretty self-explanatory, except for the food trails, which aren't even fully described in the more verbose slideshow of the top 10. And of course there are more than 10 food trails in the US (not to mention abroad), so let's dive in. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 23, 2015 - 13 comments

We go down to the indie disco every Thursday night

Irish indie rock: kinda like Scottish indie rock, but way less beards. Have you thought about Irish indie rock since the glory days of Ash, Mundy and My Bloody Valentine? There's more than U2 and Hozier happening in the Emerald Isle. [more inside]
posted by banjo_and_the_pork on Aug 3, 2015 - 6 comments

Nuut feckin' nuut!

Experts have discovered the identity of Pingu's spoken language: English in an Irish accent. (Bleeped, but possibly still not feckin' worksafe, y'old bollocks.)
posted by BiggerJ on Jul 20, 2015 - 14 comments

The Bronze Age Gold Rush of the (British) Southwest

Trading Gold: Why Bronze Age Irish Used Imported Gold “The results of this study are a fascinating finding. They show that there was no universal value of gold, at least until perhaps the first gold coins started to appear nearly two thousand years later. Prehistoric economies were driven by factors more complex than the trade of commodities – belief systems clearly played a major role.” [more inside]
posted by Michele in California on Jun 6, 2015 - 4 comments

Damn, Ireland, you're looking fabulous today!

The Republic of Ireland made history today by becoming the first country in the world to legalize gay marriage via popular vote. Ireland only decriminalized homosexuality in 1993, so the country has seen an amazing turnaround on gay rights issues. And the omens are good.
posted by orange swan on May 23, 2015 - 120 comments

"But as a husband, I was a sanctioned tyrant"

It is worth remembering that the things that were changed were ancient, hallowed traditions, sanctioned by time and religion and social practice. My right to rape my wife was part of common law – it had long seemed perfectly obvious and “natural” that the question of consent to sex simply didn’t arise in a marriage. (In many parts of the world, indeed, this still seems “natural”.) The idea that a wife was not a legally or economically separate person but a mere adjunct to her husband had very deep roots. Within my lifetime, even minimal changes to this idea were bitterly opposed.
Marriage was nothing to be proud of in 1983. On the eve of the Irish vote on marriage equality, Fintan O’Toole puts into context the change it will make to the "sanctitity" of marriage, by reflecting on the changes marriage in Ireland had already undergone since his own marriage in 1983. Tomorrow the Republic of Ireland will hold a referendum on Thirty-fourth Amendment of the Constitution (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015, which if passed would make gay marriage available.
posted by MartinWisse on May 21, 2015 - 111 comments

Choctaw Generosity

Just sixteen years years after the Trail of Tears, the Choctaw Nation collected $710* and sent it to Ireland to help during the potato famine. In 1992, a group of Irish people retraced the Trail of Tears to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the gift. [more inside]
posted by Blue Jello Elf on Mar 30, 2015 - 12 comments

'otherwise “she would have found her way back to us.”'

Where the Bodies are Buried [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 20, 2015 - 20 comments

Restoring a Punched Monet Painting

Three years ago, a man punched a hole in a Monet painting as it hung in Ireland's National Gallery. Conservationists have restored it. This is their story. [more inside]
posted by cmchap on Jan 23, 2015 - 21 comments

"This is whataboutery with a TARDIS"

It was with a heavy heart and no small amount of anger that I decided it was necessary to write a public refutation of the insidious myth that the Irish were once chattel slaves in the British colonies. The subject of this myth is not an issue in academic circles, for there is unanimous agreement, based on overwhelming evidence, that the Irish were never subjected to perpetual, hereditary slavery in the colonies, based on notions of ‘race’. Unfortunately this is not the case in the public domain and the ‘Irish slaves’ myth has been shared so frequently online that it has gone viral.
For OpenDemocracy, Laim Hogan writes a short article on the myth of Irish slavery, extracted from his larger essay 'The myth of “Irish slaves” in the colonies'. This has become relevant again in the wake of Ferguson as white supremacists and others use it to disparage and minimise African-American history and suffering: "the Irish don't ask for reparations and they were slaves".
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 19, 2015 - 97 comments

Lenin's Irish Accent

Did Vladimir Lenin speak English with an Irish accent? The blog of Dublin culture Come Here To Me has some fun digging into Lenin's supposed Rathmines accent. The Dublin Review of Books describes the now extinct "Rathmines accent" a bit more, but says the Lenin story is not "enormously well-vouched". (The Russian embassy in Ireland apparently thinks otherwise).
posted by rollick on Nov 6, 2014 - 10 comments

About 55 000 Blue whales. (That’s quite a lot of Pumpkin.)

Jack O’lanterns: Pumpkins and turnips and fungi, Oh My!, a brief but informative blog post by Kirsty Jackson at Plant Scientist.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Oct 31, 2014 - 9 comments

Mine tastes like a doctor's office.

Irish People Taste American Junk Food for the First Time
posted by Evilspork on Sep 30, 2014 - 173 comments

the constant traffic of foreign objects through this woman's body

"When do women in Ireland get to say 'no'? Today we find out that the answer is 'never', not really – not if a man has other ideas and the state decides to enforce his use of a woman's body." [Warning: may be triggering.] New Statesman, "Violation after violation: why did Ireland force a woman on hunger strike to bear her rapist's child?" [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 21, 2014 - 150 comments

Statues Taking Selfies

An internaut helped some statues take their first selfies at Crawford Art Gallery in Cork, Ireland.
posted by BaffledWaffle on Aug 9, 2014 - 8 comments

“Uncouth, untuneful, and unmusical.”

Sean-nós singing: a bluffer's guide. While the future of the Gaeltacht is in question, sean-nós singing is alive and well in Ireland and beyond. [more inside]
posted by Sheydem-tants on Jul 30, 2014 - 24 comments

"The Clash would have KILLED to have come from Derry"

Derry/Londonderry, Northern Ireland, was a dangerous place to be in the late 1970s. With bombs, shootings, British Army Patrols, riots on the streets, and The Ramones and New York Dolls on the turntable, the most punk thing 5 Catholic lads could do was to sing upbeat songs about adolescent lust, girls, getting nowhere with said girls, and the general struggles of being young. In the bleeding heart of The Troubles, The Undertones escaped by dreaming of a life more ordinary. [more inside]
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Jun 11, 2014 - 38 comments

Nothing to see here. Move along

A week later she got back to me and said do you really want all of these deaths? I said I do. She told me I would be charged for each record. Then she asked me did I realize the enormity of the numbers of deaths there?”

The registrar came back with a list of 796 children. “I could not believe it. I was dumbfounded and deeply upset,” says Corless. “There and then I said this isn’t right. There’s nothing on the ground there to mark the grave, there’s nothing to say it’s a massive children’s graveyard. It’s laid abandoned like that since it was closed in 1961.”
It had long been known children had died in the Mother and Baby home for "fallen women" in Tuan Galway, but it was not until local historian Catherine Corless started investigating that it became clear that between 1925 and 1961, 800 children were buried in a mass grave on the site, possibly inside a septic tank. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 6, 2014 - 117 comments

May the road rise up to meet you.

The Roader’s Digest is ‘the most complete archive of information on the British and Irish road networks on the web.’ from the A1 to the R999; from the B3306 to the B855, they probably have a description of it. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on May 6, 2014 - 20 comments

Travelers

The Dead Zoo Gang "Over the last several years, millions of dollars worth of antique rhino horns have been stolen from natural history museum collections around the world. The only thing more unusual than the crimes is the theory about who is responsible: A handful of families from rural Ireland known as the Rathkeale Rovers." (Via)
posted by zarq on Apr 2, 2014 - 22 comments

The Google Archipelago

Google has been in Ireland since 2003, and some former Google employees and contractors with significant experience at the company say that Google’s reputation as a great employer is undeserved. Permanent staff are well taken care of, they say, but even many permanent staff are overqualified, overworked, and perform relatively menial tasks. In addition, entire layers of hidden contractors and temporary workers do much of the work without the benefits or opportunities accorded permanent staff.
posted by gorbweaver on Apr 1, 2014 - 34 comments

Book of Kells online

Trinity College Dublin has added high-quality scans of the Book of Kells to their archives. These scans are now viewable by the public online.
posted by daisystomper on Mar 19, 2014 - 9 comments

Explaining the faux Irish pub revolution

Ireland, as much of the world knows it, was invented in 1991.
posted by Chrysostom on Mar 18, 2014 - 197 comments

A three donkey race

Castletown Donkey Derby 1994
posted by rollick on Mar 17, 2014 - 13 comments

A quick overview of Saint Patrick and the druids and reptiles of Ireland

It's pretty widely known that there have never been snakes in Ireland, so who did Saint Patrick chase out? The case has been made that the story of Saint Patrick chasing out druids (snake-tattooed pagans) is also a myth (and Patrick wasn't even Irish). But that doesn't mean there are no reptiles in Ireland. The only native land-based reptile is the viviparous lizard, though there are other reptiles that are semi-inhabitants of Ireland. And this brings us to the the amateur survey of Ireland's lizards, newts, frogs and slow worms, one of a number of such surveys hosted by Biology.ie, "Ireland's premier Biodiversity Awareness portal."
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 17, 2014 - 32 comments

"Ireland at this time had a largely cow-based economy"

"I’ve said this many times before and I’ll say it many times again, but one of the joys of webcomics is their ability to cover every possible subject and fill every conceivable niche. Say, for example, you’re into early Irish literature and you want to read it in comics form. Webcomics are happy to help you out. At this very moment, in fact, there are at least two ongoing webcomics based on the Táin Bó Cúailnge, or Cattle Raid of Cooley, the central epic of the Ulster cycle: Patrick Brown’s The Cattle Raid of Cooley and M.K. Reed’s About a Bull. Thank you, webcomics! You’ve justified the existence of the Internet yet again!" -- Shaenon Garrity reviews two niche webcomics.
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 16, 2014 - 17 comments

"Oh, Danny Boy"

With St. Patrick's Day fast approaching, it's a great opportunity to have a look at "Danny Boy". [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Mar 12, 2014 - 50 comments

THE LIFE OF A PEOPLE IS PICTURED IN THEIR SPEECH.

This book deals with the Dialect of the English Language that is spoken in Ireland. As the Life of a people—according to our motto—is pictured in their speech, our picture ought to be a good one, for two languages were concerned in it—Irish and English. ... Here for the first time—in this little volume of mine—our Anglo-Irish Dialect is subjected to detailed analysis and systematic classification.
P.W. Joyce's 1910 work, "English as We Speak it in Ireland," is a fascinating chronicle of a language's life, and no mistake. [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Mar 6, 2014 - 8 comments

Down with this sort of thing

The campaign against anti-homophobia
posted by EndsOfInvention on Feb 27, 2014 - 18 comments

Panti Bliss Abbey Theatre Speech.

Drag Queen Panti Bliss, aka Rory O'Neill, received a standing ovation after speaking at Dublin's Abbey Theatre on homophobia, and oppression. [more inside]
posted by Catch on Feb 5, 2014 - 36 comments

You'll probably want your winter wetsuit

Icy weather getting you down? How about a nice relaxing beach holiday? The same weather pattern bringing Antarctic temperatures to America is pushing Himalayan surf towards Europe. With storm swell battering coastlines from Portugal to Cornwall, big-wave specialists from around the world are flocking to the unlikely surf mecca of Mullaghmore, Co. Sligo, Ireland. Apparently it's been pretty intense... "Down there was living repeatedly rabbit punched while diving in the deep!" [more inside]
posted by Pre-Taped Call In Show on Jan 8, 2014 - 17 comments

No, Thomas; I am your father.

Adding to the widely reported speculation that Chiwetel Ejiofor is joining the cast, the BBC is reporting that open auditions for two of the lead roles in the next Star Wars film are being held across Britain and Ireland in the next few weeks. Shooting is still slated to start in January. The audition call tweet gives details of the roles... [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Nov 5, 2013 - 114 comments

Million Dollar Hero (In A Five And Ten Cents Store)

Philip Chevron - "singer, writer, composer, punk rocker, poet, Radiator, Pogue" - passed away from esophageal cancer on October 8th, far too young at only 56. He was most widely known as the Pogues’ rhythm guitarist, who penned "Thousands Are Sailing", a haunting ballad about Irish immigration to the USA that quickly became a live favourite (in later shows usually sung by Phil himself). [more inside]
posted by Skybly on Oct 18, 2013 - 19 comments

Farewell to Tilting

The most Irish island in the world. Booker Prize winning author Anne Enright travels to the edge of Newfoundland. (single page version, may trigger printer).
posted by rollick on Sep 25, 2013 - 66 comments

The sound of galloping horses

The Bluffer's guide to Irish folk: 20 songs from the last 50-odd years of Irish traditional music.
posted by rollick on Sep 14, 2013 - 27 comments

Romance in Ireland

One hundred years ago today, W.B. Yeats published one of his best known poems, September 1913, as a letter to the Irish Times. [more inside]
posted by rollick on Sep 8, 2013 - 7 comments

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