1290 posts tagged with Japan.
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AKIRA: How To Animate Light

How Akira uses lighting to tell its story.
posted by Artw on Nov 29, 2016 - 15 comments

Fulfill your heart’s desire to go to Australia in Yamaguchi Prefecture!?

"If you can’t take a trip to the Land Down Under, come enjoy the Australia-like Yamaguchi Prefecture!"
posted by No-sword on Nov 26, 2016 - 14 comments

Earthquake sparks Japan tsunami warning

A 6.9 magnitude earthquake off eastern Japan near Fukushima prefecture has prompted a tsunami warning of possible 3m (10ft) waves. [more inside]
posted by sconbie on Nov 21, 2016 - 24 comments

City Boy

TOKYO CULTURE STORY|今夜はブギー・バック(smooth rap) in 40 YEARS OF TOKYO FASHION & MUSIC / 'A chronological music video that compilates 40 years of Tokyo fashion and music from 1976 to 2016.'
posted by timshel on Nov 14, 2016 - 7 comments

China-Japan-Russia-S.Korea Plan New Grid

Entrepreneurs in China, South Korea, Russia, and Japan have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that seeks to create the Asia Super Grid. It will transmit electrical power from renewable sources from areas of the world that are best able to produce it to consumers in other parts of the world. The idea is dependent on development of an ultra-high voltage grid operating at more than 1,000 kilovolts AC and 800 kilovolts DC over thousands of kilometers. It envisions interconnecting grids across regions, nations, and even continents with a capacity of over 10 gigawatts. [more inside]
posted by lazycomputerkids on Nov 13, 2016 - 30 comments

Japanese Traditional Crafts

A Youtube playlist of short and beautiful videos portraying various traditional Japanese crafts. For example: Decorated paper. [more inside]
posted by carter on Oct 28, 2016 - 14 comments

Springs and things

A mesmerising video of industrial robots working together to create a variety of springs. [more inside]
posted by Stark on Oct 26, 2016 - 28 comments

Mundane details of living

"...the underlying philosophy here is that what is mundane in one local is exotic in another, and underlying the daily events in all of our lives, there is profound truth lurking in the seemingly mundane details of living."

In the early 90s, Lyle Hiroshi Saxon filmed many hours of video documenting scenes and life in Tokyo and other areas in Japan.
1990 / 1991 / 1992 / 1993
posted by timshel on Oct 24, 2016 - 11 comments

Ed Motta - Japanese City Pop Mix Vol. 2.

Brazilian musician, Ed Motta, created a good mix of Japanese 70s-80s AOR music titled: Japanese City Pop Mix Vol. 2. [more inside]
posted by gen on Oct 21, 2016 - 13 comments

Japanese Cat Festival

Today, the Kagurazaka district in Tokyo had its annual Bakeneko Festival. Pictures from last year. [more inside]
posted by eye of newt on Oct 16, 2016 - 5 comments

the process by which we all eventually pass away

Taller Than the Trees [N/YT] by Megan Mylan - "Japanese men haven't traditionally been caregivers. But for Masami Hayata, it's a crucial part of raising his family." (via)
posted by kliuless on Oct 16, 2016 - 1 comment

Lost In Shinjuku

Lost In Shinjuku A series of double, triple, quadruple, and quintuple exposures taken over one night in October in the Shinjuku area. [via mefi projects]
posted by not_the_water on Oct 15, 2016 - 9 comments

joint session

The Joinery contains animated illustrations of wooden joints coming together.
posted by griphus on Oct 10, 2016 - 23 comments

Hollywood stars in Japanese whiskey commercials

Hollywood stars in Japanese whiskey commercials
posted by timshel on Oct 7, 2016 - 33 comments

Parabat mori

The Monks Who Spent Years Turning Themselves into Mummies—While Alive

The Japanese climate is not exactly conducive to mummification. There are no peat bogs, no arid deserts, and no alpine peaks perennially encased in ice. The summers are hot and humid. Yet somehow a group of Buddhist monks from the Shingon sect discovered a way to mummify themselves through rigorous ascetic training in the shadow of a particularly sacred peak in the mountainous northern prefecture of Yamagata. Between 1081 and 1903, at least 17 monks managed to mummify themselves.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Oct 6, 2016 - 33 comments

Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue.

What do you do when your company's commercial sparks urban legends about a curse? Why, replace it with one that isn't creepy at all. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Oct 5, 2016 - 38 comments

A preview of the next generation of autonomous vehicles

Take your seat and let the technology do the work! [more inside]
posted by carter on Oct 5, 2016 - 14 comments

Calligraphy ・Fashion ・Travel

Shunpu is a Tokyo-based Instagrammer who focuses on coffee and Japanese calligraphy.
posted by Elementary Penguin on Sep 26, 2016 - 10 comments

Daily life for kids in Japan.

Why Japanese bathrooms are the best. What a Japanese apartment is like. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.
posted by Bee'sWing on Sep 24, 2016 - 63 comments

Five years after the tsunami, a husband still searches the sea

"Takamatsu went out with [the] regular dive customers -- the ones who dove for fun. They had no idea Takamatsu was searching for a body." [SLNYT] [warning: some graphic details re body decomposition]
posted by trillian on Aug 30, 2016 - 12 comments

“the way of the sword, the way of the chef”

Food Manga: Where Culture, Conflict And Cooking All Collide [NPR.org] “In Japan, nearly every interest has a manga dedicated to it, whether it's sports, music or shooting pool. So it's no wonder that food, which has always been tied to Japan's cultural identity, has skyrocketed as a genre of manga, which represents about 40 percent of all books published in that country. Food manga first appeared in the 1980s, when the Japanese economy was strong, says Nancy Stalker, professor of Japanese history and culture at the University of Texas at Austin. One of the first, Oishinbo, ran for more than 20 years and became the basis for an anime series, as have many manga since. Conflict and cooking are at the heart of many food manga: Food Wars, Soldier of Food, Wakakozake, Detective Glutton, Solitary Gourmet, Criminal Grub, Cooking Master Boy, Antique Bakery, High Plains Gourmet.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Aug 28, 2016 - 38 comments

"Traitor." "Too much make-up." "Dressed as a woman but a hawkish man."

Tokyo elects Yuriko Koike as first female governor Ms Koike is a member of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), but it did not endorse her so she ran as an independent. (SLBBC)
posted by infini on Aug 1, 2016 - 46 comments

The kappa may be adorable, but it has very few boundaries.

How a Mythical Imp that Snuck Up People's Large Intestines Became a Symbol of Japan
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jul 21, 2016 - 22 comments

༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ

Kirby Café [Japanese] Starting this August, several Kirby Cafes will open across the country [Only in Japan]. Here are some of the dishes that will be served. The Kirby Cafe opens August 5 at Lucua 1100 in Osaka’s Umeda and will run until September 4. Similar cafes are slated to open this August in Tokyo and Nagoya. [via: Kotaku]
posted by Fizz on Jul 20, 2016 - 26 comments

Humanity has always embraced household gods

“Pray for Kumamoto & Kumamon" What is cute? Specifically, what is kawaii? A long read exploration, ranging from earthquakes to mayonnaise and Satan. [more inside]
posted by doctornemo on Jul 20, 2016 - 16 comments

Meanwhile, in Japan

The Liberal Democrat Party* won big in the July elections in Japan, giving the coalition of parties led by the LDP a two-thirds majority in both the Upper and Lower Houses of the Japanese government, which could allow the party to ram through amendments to the constitution. While Article 9, the antiwar amendment, has long been targeted, it's starting to look much, much worse. [more inside]
posted by Ghidorah on Jul 14, 2016 - 46 comments

Uncovering Forgotten Stories of Hiroshima

Keiko Horikawa is a Japanese freelance journalist whose work, unknown in English translation until now, deals with the value of life and the weight of death. Her two subjects are the death penalty and the atomic bombing in Hiroshima, which has gained new urgency as bomb survivors, the hibakusha, die out after 70 years. Here is a translation of an event promoting her book about the Genbaku Kuyoto, the mound containing the unclaimed remains of approximately 70,000 bomb victims, and her effort to reunite the 815 identified remains with their families.
posted by Small Dollar on Jun 14, 2016 - 3 comments

It's a beautiful day for a horror movie... Let's play two!

Back in 2013, we saw Sadako from The Ring throw out the first pitch at a baseball game in Japan. Then earlier this year, we saw the trailer for the upcoming The Ring/The Grudge crossover movie, Sadako vs. Kayako. You can see where this is going: Sadako throws out first pitch against Kayako at Japanese baseball game. (Via.)
posted by Cash4Lead on Jun 7, 2016 - 19 comments

Four fine, odd mixes

(Visible) Cloaks’ Spencer Doran knows how to crate dig (via):
posted by Going To Maine on Jun 3, 2016 - 6 comments

Come for the handmade dollhouse miniatures, stay for the ninja hamster.

Japanese YouTube user HMS2 creates meticulous handmade dollhouse miniatures: DIY Fake Food, DIY Dollhouse Items. There are also hundreds of kit-making videos, from food replicas to complete villages. Yes, there are Re-Ment unboxings! And oh yeah, he also built a ninja mansion for his hamster. h/t [Alert: Ninja mansion link has auto-hamster music.]
posted by Room 641-A on May 24, 2016 - 10 comments

Hiroshima: The New Yorker, 1946

A year after the bomb was dropped, Miss Sasaki was a crippIe; Mrs. Nakamura was destitute; Father Kleinsorge was back in the hospital; Dr. Sasaki was not capable of the work he once could do; Dr. Fujii had lost the thirty-room hospital it took him many years to acquire, and had no prospects of rebuilding it; Mr. Tanimoto’s church had been ruined and he no longer had his exceptional vitality. The lives of these six people, who were among the luckiest in Hiroshima, would never be the same.--originally published in The New Yorker, August 31, 1946.
posted by MoonOrb on May 21, 2016 - 29 comments

Odnarotoop, apparently

Portland is courting Japanese tourists with this absurd video (warning: earworm). [more inside]
posted by librarina on May 20, 2016 - 65 comments

Oyasumi nasai (sleep well!, おやすみなさい!, お休みなさい!)

The history of the wafuton goes back to ancient times more than three centuries before the Common Era. Considered to be good for the health, yet convenient to roll, store, and air, the Japanese futon is rather a different beast from that more familiar convertible futon common in the West. William Brouwer is credited with the original concept and industrial design of the wooden structure, while in Japan, it is master craftsmen like Hisayoshi Nohara, Grand Champion of Futon Making, who are revered for their work. You can try one out in a ryokan.
posted by infini on May 19, 2016 - 36 comments

The 0-113 Racehorse Who Charmed a Country

In 2003, the small Kochi Racetrack in southern Japan was in trouble. The Lost Decade hit the provincial raceway hard, and the staff was scrambling to find some way to stave off bankruptcy. One day, they found an unlikely savior. This is the story of Haru Urara, the losingest racehorse in Japan, and how she gave hope to millions.
posted by Small Dollar on May 19, 2016 - 9 comments

But then, in 1990, a hero emerges

Filmmaker Noah Sterling presents The History of Tentacle Porn Animated! (SFW) [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on May 14, 2016 - 13 comments

Wins above replacement ozeki

538 crunches the numbers behind 255 years of professional sumo tournaments.
posted by Chrysostom on May 13, 2016 - 12 comments

Check in with the velociraptor at the world’s first robot hotel

Japan has a national gift for holding in balance the stateliness of tradition and the marvel of novelty. So it ought to come as no surprise that on the western margin of the archipelago, on a serene bay in a remote area of the Nagasaki Prefecture, there is an enormous theme park dedicated to the splendors of imperial Holland. It follows with perfect logic that the historical theme park’s newest lodging place is the world’s first hotel staffed by robots.
posted by ellieBOA on May 13, 2016 - 12 comments

Yamanote Eki-Melo

The Yamanote Line is the most famous and well-travelled train line in Tokyo. Each station on the Yamanote plays a song (eki-melo, "train melody", 発車メロディ or "hassha melody") when trains are about to depart, differing by platform, direction and station. Click any post to listen to that station's eki-melo! (Links to sound clips can be tricky to discern - begin with the station list, find a station you like and then click on the title of song which follows the platform & station names.) [more inside]
posted by timshel on May 12, 2016 - 11 comments

I want to cook condom food for you

Japanese Condom Cookbook Raises Awareness For Protected Sex

(available as a Kindle edition)
posted by Johnny Wallflower on May 9, 2016 - 14 comments

Short Attention Span Theatre: Cooking Edition

Tastemade, the food and travel video network, (previously) has an extensive collection of short (15-60 second) food and cooking videos (and photos) from around the world. Incredibly, many recipes are self-explanatory on their own, but most have the full recipe in the comments: Japan; Brasil; Español; Indonesia; Chile; UAE. The main Tastemade Instagram account includes English versions of at least some of the other videos. [Jaunty auto-playing music alert.]
posted by Room 641-A on May 5, 2016 - 4 comments

CRUNCH nom nom nom

Compilation of hippos eating whole watermelons
posted by Johnny Wallflower on May 4, 2016 - 29 comments

“Watching them feels wicked meditative.”

Brian Feldman, Hopes&Fears: Why are people obsessed with Japanese miniature cooking videos?
There is an irreconcilable conflict at the heart of working with miniatures: “It’s about as far removed as you can get from the chaos of real life, but at the same time it requires you to be a very attentive observer of real life if you hope to capture that in your miniature art. It’s a cool paradox and one that’s really fun to play with as an artist.”
[more inside] posted by We had a deal, Kyle on May 3, 2016 - 17 comments

A cat name is Sashimi-san.Somebody tell me why she's got a anger.

Filmmaker SOEZIMAX (Shingo Soejima) visits his sister. Her cat really, really hates him. [more inside]
posted by J.K. Seazer on May 2, 2016 - 29 comments

Embroidery on Youtube

Embroider a Guanyin with the hair of the descendant of Rinpoches. Embroider with hooks and gold in India. Embroider with the techniques of European (late) renaissance and modern embroidery. Embroider (...eventually) a kimono. Embroider with horsetail. Embroider with designer Yohji Yamamoto. Embroider like a Ukrainian.
posted by flibbertigibbet on May 2, 2016 - 5 comments

Indistinguishable from magic

20+ drones; 16,500 LEDs; 3 shamisen players; 1 Mt. Fuji: Filmmaker Tsuyoshi Takashiro orchestrates a performance combining drones and the Oyamakai shamisen ensemble.
posted by wintersweet on May 1, 2016 - 13 comments

how it's made in japan

Ever wondered what a possible Japanese equivalent for How It's Made could be like? The jstsciencechannel has one! There are from 2 to 150, and 151 to 309 videos to choose from. Sadly, they lack English subtitles, however there are a handful of videos that do have them. Starting with mayonnaise, the series takes you through the making of steel balls (available in English), the construction and testing of sewing machines, how rice crackers are made, a thermos factory, the recycling of PET bottles, a matcha tea factory and the creation of bamboo whisks, and plenty more.
posted by aroweofshale on Apr 30, 2016 - 19 comments

Supper Mario Broth

Supper Mario Broth is a wonderfully obsessive blog devoted to all sorts of Super Mario Brothers minutia. Really, you are not prepared for this. Things like.... [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Apr 18, 2016 - 18 comments

Can you earthquake proof a city?

Four experts talked to the BBC World Service Inquiry programme, which was published on March 24th, about how to make earthquake-prone cities safer. More people may be asking that question in the wake of the major earthquake that struck earlier today, April 16, in Ecuador and the twin earthquakes that hit Japan on April 15 and April 16. US residents have reason to worry as well. [more inside]
posted by Bella Donna on Apr 16, 2016 - 15 comments

Dave Spector, Gaijin Tarento: Big in Japan, unknown in the US

Tarento, a Japanese rendering (gairaigo) of the English word "talent," or actors, though often is used to refer to actors who take part in more comedic panel shows. Gaijin tarento are "foreign talent," non-Japanese actors who speak Japanese and often represent a stereotyped view of their given nationalities. One of the best-known and longest operating gaijin tarento is David Spector, a relative unknown in his native Chicago, but a household name in Japan (NYT, 2014). The strange cult of the Gaijin Tarento (YT, 5:41) [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 10, 2016 - 30 comments

The language of flowers, spoken in forms around the world

In the Victorian Era, "the language of flowers" (floriography) was all the rage. According to The Smithsonian Gardens History in Bloom summary (and activities sheets) for The Language of Flowers (PDF), "Nearly all Victorian homes would own at least one of the guide books dedicated to the ‘language of flowers.’ The authors of these guidebooks used visual and verbal analogies, religious and literary sources, folkloric connections, and botanical attributes to derive the various associations for the flowers." But where did it come from? (Google books preview) Istanbul in the Tulip Age (PDF, first chapter of Crime and Punishment in Istanbul: 1700-1800), and Turkish love-letters and harems ... somewhat. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 1, 2016 - 8 comments

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