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6 posts tagged with KurtWeill. (View popular tags)
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For if we don't find the next whiskey-bar, I tell you we must die!

"Oh, show us the way, to the next whiskey-bar. Oh, don't ask why, oh, don't ask why." And so opens the Alabama Song (Google books preview) by Bertholt Brecht and Brecht's close collaborator, Elisabeth Hauptmann (Gbp), first published in 1927. Brecht set it to music and performed it on stages all over Berlin, but the better known version was scored by classical composer Kurt Weill, who was impressed with Brecht’s poetry and wanted to break away from the constraints of his previous work. It was this version, first performed by Lotte Lenya, that was made famous by The Doors and their use of a Marxophone (Wikipedia). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 13, 2013 - 24 comments

Und der Haifisch, der hat Zähne

To start with the beginning: Jack Sheppard was a notorious English robber who inspired John Gay to write The Beggar's Opera (1728). Two centuries later, the German composer Kurt Weill and dramatist Bertolt Brecht adapted it into a musical as a socialist critique of capitalism and the modern world: Die Dreigroschenoper. It was about to open when the lead actor demanded a song to introduce his character. It was this song that would open the play and at its premiere, it was Kurt Gerron who would be the first to sing the Moriat of Macky Messer as the street singer setting the scene. [more inside]
posted by MartinWisse on Aug 16, 2013 - 20 comments

Selections from Hal Willner's Lost in the Stars: The Music of Kurt Weill

Lou Reed - September Song
Sting with Dominic Muldowney -- The Ballad of Mac the Knife
Ralph Schuckett with Richard Butler, Bob Dorough, Ellen Shipley and John Petersen - Alabama Song
Dagmar Krause -- Surabaya Johnny
John Zorn - Der Kleine des Lieben Gottes
Tom Waits - What Keeps Mankind Alive?
Todd Rundgren with Gary Windo -- Call From The Grave/Ballad In Which Macheath Begs All Men For Forgiveness
Mark Bingham, Aaron Neville, Johnny Adams - Oh Heavenly Salvation
Carla Bley with Phil Woods -- Lost In The Stars

Selections from Lost in the Stars: The Music of Kurt Weill
posted by y2karl on Feb 28, 2013 - 23 comments

"Stripsody" is NOT what you think, you dirty old mefite

Cathy Berberian (warning: auto opera audio!) was not your usual mezzo-soprano. Her vocal range was only exceeded by her range of musical interest (multi-YouTubage follows) [more inside]
posted by oneswellfoop on Jul 28, 2010 - 6 comments

I'm not sure if I'll be able to listen to "Rid of Me" without a (more) severe bought of castration anxiety.

PJ Harvey suggests that all the castration imagery of Rid of Me isn't necessarily metaphorical. [more inside]
posted by Weebot on Oct 6, 2007 - 93 comments

Oh the days dwindle down, to a precious few...

38 versions of Kurt Weill's hauntingly beautiful September Song. [more inside]
posted by vronsky on Sep 28, 2007 - 24 comments

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