586 posts tagged with London.
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on the history of electronic music

Createdigitalmusic collects together 11+ documentaries on the history of electronic music. Ranging from 2 on Delia Derbyshire of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop (1 previously), to EMS (previously), to detroit, acid house, rave (previously), tresor, and more. Plus one news report an the early days of Chicago house that's a documentary in and of itself.
posted by advil on Aug 29, 2015 - 16 comments

The songs were about London...if you want to be particular, South London

Squeeze - Take Me I'm Yours (2012) | Squeeze - Bands Reunited (2003). Previously: Up the Clapham Junction
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 26, 2015 - 33 comments

DNA sculptures in London

London art trail: 'What's in your DNA?' | sculpture gallery | map. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Aug 20, 2015 - 1 comment

A different breakfast every day

Breakfast -- Eating the World Every Morning is a series of dispatches about breakfast around the world. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Aug 18, 2015 - 35 comments

Egon is wrong. Print isn't dead.

While many in print media are moving their focus to the web, London Reconnections is doing the opposite and launching as bi-monthly* magazine! Brought to us by master of online long form, mefi's own Lapsed Historian garius, London Reconnections digs into the least known aspects of London's transportation history as well as keeping a finger on the pulse of the latest issues facing the worlds oldest undergound. [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by Iteki on Aug 17, 2015 - 12 comments

No matter what, Edward will always be special.

Edward Scissorhands, a baby sloth at the London Zoo, has a teddy bear BFF. [Buzzfeedified]
posted by phunniemee on Aug 8, 2015 - 25 comments

Mapping prostitutes in London in the 18th century

The (in)famous Harris's List of Covent-Garden Ladies, or, Man of Pleasure's Kalender (the 1788 edition on Project Gutenberg) catalogued, often with some of the worst puns and double entendres imaginable, the names and locations of the London prostitutes. The website Romantic London has mapped 93 of the entries. As Romantic London reports:
Harris’s List is lewd and frequently misogynistic, romanticising prostitution while largely silencing the women involved. It commonly fails to account for (and occasionally seems uncomfortably to relish) the suffering and exploitation of those whose histories it affects to encompass. It is sometimes compelling as a composition, but its main use for modern audiences is as a record both of a deeply unpleasant side of eighteenth-century London and of the social attitudes which fostered the kinds of commerce and objectification which it embodies.

posted by anothermug on Aug 7, 2015 - 6 comments

100 Years of ...

[more inside]
posted by jillithd on Aug 6, 2015 - 11 comments

How many ridiculously long escalators can YOU find?

Axonometric diagrams of every London Underground station Glorious, glorious tube station diagrams (not to scale) from Transport for London that will make fans of David Macaulay, Stephen Biesty, or Kate Ascher swoon. From the rather simple Bethnal Green to the much more complex Bank/Monument, enjoy a perspective of stations quite different from the daily commuter's view. (Previously from the same website.)
posted by ocherdraco on Aug 4, 2015 - 35 comments

D'ya get me, bruv?

A new London accent strikingly different from Cockney has emerged in the last few years. Linguists call it "Multicultural London English" (or MLE) and although it has obvious roots in the London black community it's now displacing Cockney to become a universal accent for working class London youth, regardless of race. Change is spreading so fast that London teens often have radically different accents from their own parents. [more inside]
posted by w0mbat on Jul 28, 2015 - 71 comments

Ooh ooh a special route master!

Exhausting a Crowd is an interactive video you can annotate yourself, using footage from a London street. It was commissioned by the Victoria & Albert Museum as part of their All of This Belongs to You exhibition.
posted by like_neon on Jul 10, 2015 - 13 comments

"Napoleon wore his sideways"

Would you like A black felt bicorne hat, worn by the Emperor Napoleon, or a lock of Hair from the Mane of Buonaparte's favourite white Charger, or perhaps an Original hand blown bottle … with a crowned 'N' enclosed in laurel wreath, no label, level of liquid is 8 in. (20 cm) below base of cork? Well, you just missed your chance.
posted by R. Mutt on Jul 9, 2015 - 7 comments

"People in 2015 shouldn't be able to get away with things like this ..."

There was a thought that there weren’t enough bands with guitars that were exciting in the same way as the bands we cared about so we had the thought let’s try and do it better ourselves ... What I wanted that was something post-punk or whatever you want to call it but with songs. There was a while there where I wasn’t hearing any songs.
Formed in 2013, North London band Desperate Journalist take their name from an obscure 1979 beef between The Cure and the NME's Paul Morley. Together, they make jangly, intense indie pop, redolent of faded seaside resorts, cramped book-filled bedsits, and English winter chill. Their debut album, Desperate Journalist [Spotify], appeared earlier this year. [Youtube.] [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Jul 7, 2015 - 21 comments

"Seeing my passengers in such a state really shocked me"

Ten years ago, four suicide bombers carrying rucksacks packed with explosives attacked central London, killing 52 people and injuring hundreds more. It was the worst single terrorist atrocity on UK soil. [more inside]
posted by NordyneDefenceDynamics on Jul 7, 2015 - 42 comments

Brighton's probably still pretty expensive.

It starts with a vanguard class of young creative types reclaiming zones of social and economic dereliction, setting up what Ehrenhalt sardonically describes as “projects through which a small coterie of local artists seek to display their sheer edginess to one another”. The hipster pioneers are followed by young couples with bourgeois-bohemian sensibilities – what the French call “bobo” – who breed and fill the pavements with space-age prams. I was that cliché once, wheeling my daughters around Hackney in the gentrificational transition between murder rates falling and Foxtons arriving on the high street. Then come the really wealthy types who like urban edge fully blunted by waves of demographic change. Before you know it a draughty three-bedroom Victorian terraced house in what was once a slum costs more than £1m. [more inside]
posted by Kitteh on Jun 30, 2015 - 31 comments

The Nightwalker and the Nocturnal Picaresque

The introduction of street lighting to 17th-century London saw an explosion of nocturnal activity in the capital, most of it centring around the selling of sex.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 17, 2015 - 13 comments

...oh my God! -- it’s full of pixels!

1.47 Gigapixel panorama of Barack Obama's 2009 Inaugural Address
4-Gigapixel panorama of the surface of Mars
34-Gigapixel panorama of Prague
152-Gigapixel panorama of Rio de Janiero taken from Sugarloaf
272-Gigapixel panorama of Shanghai
320-Gigapixel panorama of London
• Currently the largest: this 365-Gigapixel panorama of Mont Blanc. [story]
• GigaPan has a wide variety of panoramas in their gallery.
Blakeway Gigapixel specializes in sports stadiums in full attendance (where you can tag people you recognize) and National Parks sites like the Grand Canyon

posted by not_on_display on Jun 17, 2015 - 26 comments

A drone's eye view of Crossrail (SLYT)

Crossrail is a 70 ish mile railway currently being built right through the centre of London. Take drone flight through some of the tunnels and watch the giant mechanical Shai Halud chomp through walls.
posted by Just this guy, y'know on Jun 4, 2015 - 7 comments

House of Secrets

When the refurbishment is complete, Witanhurst will have about ninety thousand square feet of interior space, making it the second-largest mansion in the city, after Buckingham Palace. It will likely become the most expensive house in London. In 2006, the Qatari royal family bought Dudley House, on Park Lane, for about forty million pounds; after a renovation, its estimated resale value is two hundred and fifty million pounds. Real-estate agents expect that the completed Witanhurst will be worth three hundred million pounds—about four hundred and fifty million dollars.

And no one knows who owns it.
posted by Chrysostom on May 29, 2015 - 36 comments

Mind the gap

Harry Beck's original London Underground Tube Map was a design classic. The latest Transport For London version... Not so much.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on May 21, 2015 - 37 comments

The School of English: a story by Hilary Mantel

'Beneath those houses,' the butler said, 'you should see what goes on. No one suspects the half of it. The whole earth is dug out. Spaciousness beneath. The panic room is seven times the size of this one. The whole of London can fall down around them and yet their freezer is fully stocked. All showers are multi-jet steam cabinets, plus the kitchen has coffee machine built in, ice machine, temperature-controlled cabinet for wine storage, sous vide machine with vacuum sealer, and an air filtration system that is suitable for allergy sufferers.' [TW: rape]
posted by smcg on May 9, 2015 - 9 comments

Korean with a side of litigiousness

"So what does this curious tale of a mediocre restaurant prove? It proves that in London’s modern restaurant business, the combination of furiously high costs, reputations and big egos can be explosive. Indeed only one thing is clear to me. Right now the people really making money out of Jinjuu are the lawyers." Guardian restaurant critic Jay Raynor reviews Jinjuu - and the ensuing legal storm he accidentally provoked.
posted by Punkey on Apr 26, 2015 - 64 comments

Mrs. Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself. 💐

"Neill was hosting a special flower show at his shop called 'Passion for Peonies' as part of Chelsea Fringe. The Peonies he had on display were absolutely breathtaking ~ take a look." [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 1, 2015 - 13 comments

“For me, to live in Pakistan is to know extremes of hope and despair.”

Globalization is a brutal phenomenon. It brings us mass displacement, wars, terrorism, unchecked financial capitalism, inequality, xenophobia, climate change. But if globalization is capable of holding out any fundamental promise to us, any temptation to go along with its havoc, then surely that promise ought to be this: we will be more free to invent ourselves. In that country, this city, in Lahore, in New York, in London, that factory, this office, in those clothes, that occupation, in wherever it is we long for, we will be liberated to be what we choose to be.
- Discontent and Its Civilizations (excerpt), by Mohsin Hamid (previously); reviewed [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 19, 2015 - 31 comments

Lovers' Rock - Lewisham 1977

In 1977, John Goto made this series of photographic portraits of young British African-Caribbeans at Lewisham Youth Centre, South London, where he taught evening classes in photography. It was not until 2013, however, that circumstances allowed him to first exhibit and publish the work.
posted by timshel on Mar 18, 2015 - 10 comments

The extraordinary life of Janet Vaughan

Douglas Starr, in Blood, quotes the British Secretary of War, asked in 1937 what the nation proposed to do about a mass blood supply. The secretary was dismissive. Blood could not be stored for long or in great quantities, he said. On the hoof was better. “It was more satisfactory to store our blood in our people.” Janet Vaughan did not agree, and Janet Vaughan did something about it. Her medical director gave her £100, and she sent off her assistants in taxis to find all the tubing that London shops could provide.
Longreads profiles Janet Vaughan, a British scientist who found better treatments for anemia than arsenic using herself as a test subject, was a major force in creating London's first blood banks using cheap tubing and ice cream trucks, studied emergency nutrition in a post-liberation concentration Nazi death camp, and continued active research into blood and radiation into her eighties, while occasionally serving as a model for Virginia Woolf characters.
posted by Stacey on Mar 12, 2015 - 6 comments

"He used to really get on my tits."

Sibling Rivalry Made The Kinks [SLYT]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 7, 2015 - 9 comments

Knowledge is our Superpower

"Despite scant funding and resources, London’s Feminist Library is turning their 40th year into a celebration of storytelling, history – and, hopefully, sofas." Stephanie Boland at The New Statesman, 'She blinded me with library science': why the Feminist Library is more vital than ever. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 5, 2015 - 3 comments

GET THEM ON THE BLOWER

London's forgotten pneumatic messaging system.
posted by ellieBOA on Mar 4, 2015 - 38 comments

Love Tokens from the Thames

Love Tokens from the Thames, dug up by the Mud God (aka Steve Brooker of Thames and Field).
posted by gamera on Feb 14, 2015 - 17 comments

Or, a vision in a dream. A Fragment.

"Death #1: Devoured by bats. Death #2: Sailed too close to the Elder Continent; my ship, bones gained sentience." People have been discussing Sunless Sea, the nouveau-Roguelike game just released by FailBetter Games. What else are they saying? Rock, Paper, Shotgun: "...the most delicious collection of words in all of gaming." Eurogamer: "This is the video game at its most mystical and revealing." There is, of course, a trailer. [more inside]
posted by jsnlxndrlv on Feb 7, 2015 - 49 comments

1916.tiff: Recovering the Doves Type

“I went on to the foreshore when the tide was out, looked around the riverbed and found three pieces within 20 minutes.”
(The Doves Type, previously.)
posted by scruss on Feb 7, 2015 - 22 comments

grey

A collection of paper cut-out models representing brutalist architecture of London from 1960s-1970s. See also Warsaw.
posted by Combustible Edison Lighthouse on Feb 4, 2015 - 29 comments

Marriage of digital art with real-world hair styling : Pixelated hair

X-Presion, a cutting-edge (no pun intended) hair salon in Madrid, has pioneered an interesting new pixelated hair coloring technique that has the internet abuzz. Pixelated Hair Is The Newest Cutting-Edge Trend (Bored Panda) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 1, 2015 - 37 comments

Save Dippy vs Team Whale

Since 1979 the main hall in London's Natural History Museum has been dominated by a plaster cast of a fossil of a Diplodocus (apparently called 'Dippy'). It has been announced that is to be replaced by the skeleton of a Blue Whale. There has been somewhat of a reaction.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 1, 2015 - 23 comments

the Tesco Express where I’d wander round in a come-down haze

The Dalston years were the ones that finally broke me
posted by acb on Jan 20, 2015 - 18 comments

The new London is a dream that strangers are dreaming in your bed.

The Great London Gentrification Pub Crawl
posted by mippy on Jan 10, 2015 - 23 comments

Empathetic tenants need not apply

In what is being heralded as a "neo liberalist capitalist dystopic future present nightmare", a "UK version of American Psycho" or simply the "end of days", an upmarket property agency in England releases a (serious) video advert for luxury London apartments. Social media is abuzz with analysis, wondering about his day job / cover, and photoshopping, while the Independent newspaper gapes with incredulity. Comments on the video have been disabled. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Jan 4, 2015 - 142 comments

Gordon’s Makes Us Very Very Drunk

Gilbert & George, "Gordon’s Makes Us Drunk" (Tate Modern Video installation, 12 min, 1972). [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 31, 2014 - 13 comments

The Lost World of British Tape Recording Clubs

A few years ago radio producer Mark Vernon bought a hoard of old reel-to-reel audio tapes in a car boot sale in Derby, as a job lot with an elderly and very heavy tape recorder. Coaxing the old machine back to life, he realised he had rescued the jettisoned archive of the Derby Tape Club—a group of amateurs who made, played and swapped recordings in the 1960s and 70s, when domestic tape-recording was in its infancy and before the audio cassette had conquered the world. A radiophonic elegy to an anonymous group of people and their forgotten enthusiasm: domestic tape recording and amateur radio in the 1960s and '70s.
Over the years, Vernon has acquired other archives and put together radio shows, oral histories, and a compilation CD. Listen to the lost sound-scapes of The Leicester tape recording club; the Nottingham Cooperative tape recording club; and the London tape recording club [Breakdown here]. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Dec 17, 2014 - 6 comments

Snap, Crackle and Pop!

In an area of London that already boasts a cat cafe and a 3d printer cafe, two bearded twin brothers have opened the Cereal Killer Cafe that serves only breakfast cereal. [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Dec 15, 2014 - 75 comments

Lindsay Lohan Loves Living in London.

A story of redemption.
posted by vac2003 on Dec 14, 2014 - 17 comments

The Place for Royalty and The Right Sort of Young

When Mark Birley died at the age of 77 he left behind a legacy of London nightclubs for the aristocratic set ...and a highly contested $200 million dollar estate with last second will changes, phony ex-girlfriends, and feuding children. Maureen Orth explores the family life of the nightlife king.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 12, 2014 - 10 comments

Residents here decline emailed requests: Kensington Palace Gardens

"The signs on the doors are excessively polite, and use outmoded words such as 'kindly' and 'residing'. 'Kindly do not deliver items for Mr and Mrs [...] to this address as they are no longer residing here.' But it is the doorbell etiquette that is most enraging, and instructions that 'for all collections and deliveries please press the housekeeper's button only' incite a sudden surge of anarchic rage and a desire to ring all the other bells simultaneously – summoning the chef/kitchen, the residence and the caretaker." [SLTheGuardian]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Dec 4, 2014 - 43 comments

Secrets of the London Tube

A series of short videos looking at hidden corners of various Tube lines. From Londonist Londonist.
posted by carter on Nov 30, 2014 - 8 comments

Bonobo, inspired by beautiful hip-hop, London scenes, and a tumble dryer

From the rather common "skate punk into alternative music" origins to a bedroom producer who signed with Ninja Tune, Bonobo, the stage name for Simon Green, has continued to change musically. From the lone musician who made sample-based music, he has expanded into working with field recordings, studio musicians, and live shows where the band took a four bar drum break transformed it into a seven minute epic drum-sax solo battle, to which the crowd tried to clap along. You can see him live tomorrow at the Alexandra Palace in London in a special Boiler Room session, but until then, there's plenty more to see, hear and read. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 27, 2014 - 12 comments

Bouncing Here and There and Everywhere

TFL Future Streets Incubator is like the Cult of Skaro for transport planning, creating innovative ways to improve London's transport infrastructure. These include such things as turning parking spots into tiny parks and cycle scramble green lights, but the Jewel in the crown of these schemes is The Bounceway , the world's longest commuter trampoline.
posted by Just this guy, y'know on Nov 26, 2014 - 9 comments

"the freedom to make and remake our cities"

Today, we’ve been so inculcated with fear and distracted by obligations and consumer junk, we can’t even be bothered to ask why numerous miles of warm, fluorescently lit tunnels under Chancery Lane are laying mothballed while people with no homes freeze to death on the streets above them – forced to sleep in hypothermic conditions by anti-homeless spikes installed on ledges outside shops, luxury flats and offices.
Urban explorer Bradley Garrett goes spelunking below the streets of London to show the importance of urban explorers in discovering the true shape of the city.
posted by MartinWisse on Nov 12, 2014 - 12 comments

And The Motorcade Sped On

How do you get your VIPs from A to B? The motorcade, that seemingly endless stream of steel and blue light which takes possession of however much public highway it likes. If you're America, Russia or China, it's almost a competitive sport over who has the longest, with city blocks and motorway lanes locked off for the security bubble. London does it a little differently... [more inside]
posted by Devonian on Nov 10, 2014 - 50 comments

These are the times of the parables

A Parable.
"Hey do want to hear an album of spoken word poetry raps?"
*everyone looks uncomfortable*
"It's by a white girl from...England? With uh, garage beats?"
*everyone gets on to a spaceship and flies into the sun"
"Her name is Kate Tempest (previously). There's stories, about dating and generally being disaffected and drinking too much? And she utterly kills it live. Her old band was decent but, this is, like next level."
*no-one is left on earth but Common. He is wearing sunglasses as the sun flares.* *He nods his head.*
Common: "This is dope."
Mike Skinner (he's there too): "Well rude innit. Let's get a kebab mate."
F I N
posted by Potomac Avenue on Nov 7, 2014 - 13 comments

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