336 posts tagged with Map.
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Men died in the pursuit of better maps.

"Inside the crates were maps, thousands of them. In the top right corner of each one, printed in red, was the Russian word секрет. Secret" -- Inside the Secret World of Russia’s Cold War Mapmakers by Greg Miller, WIRED
posted by The Whelk on Jul 18, 2015 - 21 comments

The United States of Horror

Where everything went wrong. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 31, 2015 - 73 comments

"The map began as just a doodle."

In the summer of 1963 Jerry Gretzinger began drawing a map of an imaginary city. You can now use Jerry's Map to zoom in on any of the over 3,200 eight by ten inch panels of the original paper map, executed in acrylic, marker, colored pencil, ink, collage, and inkjet print. This short film by Greg Whitmore takes a fascinating look at the project and the artist's process, which "is dictated by the interplay between an elaborate set of rules and randomly generated instructions." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on May 26, 2015 - 2 comments

Mind the gap

Harry Beck's original London Underground Tube Map was a design classic. The latest Transport For London version... Not so much.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on May 21, 2015 - 37 comments

Exploring Auto Racing

David Clear constructs a map of the virtual space of the Intellivision classic Auto Racing, which features each track beside the other. It's part of the Intellivision Flashback game set.
posted by juiceCake on Apr 14, 2015 - 12 comments

kakkoii

Play PAC-MAN in Google Maps
posted by unliteral on Mar 31, 2015 - 25 comments

"My friend here Mr. Burke is going to trounce you all with a vengeance."

The Georgian Celebrity Map (or, A Peek at the Stars of James Gillray’s Caricatures) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 31, 2015 - 10 comments

The software GPS

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded for discovering how your brain creates a map of the space surrounding you, and how you navigate your way through a complex environment. [more inside]
posted by Dashy on Feb 4, 2015 - 8 comments

How's your subway IQ?

Can you name these cities just by looking at their subway maps? (SLWaPo)
posted by beagle on Jan 19, 2015 - 99 comments

The most popular cuisine in Utah? Hawaiian.

The Huffington Post and Yelp have collaborated to create a map showing the most popular cuisine in each state.
posted by cozenedindigo on Jan 19, 2015 - 151 comments

Chicago Tribune 1934 Chicagoland Road Map

Chicago Tribune 1934 Chicagoland Road Map Pre-O'Hare Airport, pre-Interstate Highways. Click 'Download full resolution' to download file.
posted by goethean on Jan 14, 2015 - 13 comments

Marie Tharp's map

How One Woman's Discovery Shook the Foundations of Geology "She crunched and re-crunched the numbers for weeks on end, double- and triple-checking her data. As she did, she became more convinced that the impossible was true: She was looking at evidence of a rift valley, a place where magma emerged from inside the earth, forming new crust and thrusting the land apart. If her calculations were right, the geosciences would never be the same."
posted by dhruva on Dec 9, 2014 - 25 comments

Somewhere in-between Chop Suey and Pork Roll, the truth lies.

Recently on The Blue we've had discussions about American Chop Suey and New Jersey Pork Roll, but what about other regional favorites, like Lutefisk, Scrapple, or the French Dip Sandwich? Just in time for Thanksgiving, here are a few links to get you started:

posted by Room 641-A on Nov 17, 2014 - 97 comments

Worst. Landlord. Ever.

The Public Advocate for the City of New York has released an interactive map, The NYC Landord Watchlist, which maps the city's most poorly managed buildings. The map uses data from the Department of Housing Preservation and Development to list over 6,800 buildings across New York. You can search the map by address and by borough. If you select a property listed on the map you can view the number and type of violations it has received. [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 13, 2014 - 27 comments

100% NZ Wool

Florian Pucher makes carpets. Europe. Africa. Netherlands. USA. More. Story.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 7, 2014 - 7 comments

Where men are men and the plumbing is outside

Have a swell chuckle 1940s-style at Jolly Lindgren's "hysterical" tourist maps of the Grand Canyon, Grand Coulee Dam, Lake Tahoe, Yellowstone Park, Palm Springs, and Death Valley. And it's lookin' mighty low..
posted by theodolite on Sep 24, 2014 - 25 comments

Most Distinctive Food by State

An interactive map of the weirdest eating patterns in each state.
posted by stoneweaver on Sep 2, 2014 - 88 comments

"Visualize race and income data for your community, county, and [USA]."

Justice Map [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 29, 2014 - 17 comments

Top Five Architecture Maps

Top Five Architecture Maps:
  • Iconic Houses is an international network connecting architecturally significant houses from the 20th century that are open to the public as house museums. The Iconic Houses website includes a useful Google Map showing the location of architecturally significant houses around the world.
  • Archilovers is a social network for architects, designers and lovers of architecture. Users of the network can post projects, exchange opinions and interests, and get to know designers and architects around the world.
  • The World Architecture Map (WAM) is a database of architectural information that uses Google Maps to show the locations of architectural interesting buildings around the world. It is possible to search for buildings on WAM by location, building type, architectural style or by tags.
  • Arti-Fact is great collection of architecturally important buildings and sculptures that can be found on Google Maps Street View.
  • MIMOA is a Google Maps based guide to modern architecture around the world. It is possible to browse the collection of modern architectural gems by location and by type of project.
[via Google Maps Mania]
posted by Room 641-A on Aug 20, 2014 - 2 comments

If only the real thing had only taken 5m55s.

A day-by-day map of World War I. [more inside]
posted by absalom on Jul 28, 2014 - 16 comments

I Know Where Your Cat Lives

Only 15 million, riiiight. A data experiment out of Florida State University maps the location of 1 million of the 15 million publicly available online images tagged with the word "cat." Using a supercomputer and the map coordinates imbedded in their metadata, I Know Where Your Cat Lives shows where each image was taken, to within an estimated 7.8 meters accuracy. [more inside]
posted by gottabefunky on Jul 22, 2014 - 72 comments

The Miura fold: art and mathematics of origami

The Miura fold, a type of rigid origami that works by folding flat, rigid sheets with hinges, has a number of uses. For instance, It's great for folding a map, because Interdependence of folds means that it is very difficult to reverse them and the amount of stress place on the map, and can be used on solar panels that need to be folded and unfolded by automation, as deployment only requires one motor, and to transport materials for telescope lenses that originally would be too big to fly into space. Here's one schematic for duplicating the Miura fold (PNG), and a simplified version (YouTube). More information and fun with scientific origami at Robert J. Lang's origami website.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 19, 2014 - 17 comments

ORBIS TERRARUM

In 1909, American architect and cartographer Bernerd J.S. Cahill published An Account Of A New Land Map Of The World (and at The Internet Archive), in which he described a novel way of projecting a map. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 18, 2014 - 5 comments

Space without the space

The solar system's solid surfaces stitched together. If you want some more detailed imagery, you can always browse around NASA's planetary photojournal archive.
posted by curious nu on Jul 2, 2014 - 17 comments

I can't stop! I can't stop myself!

Watch every lightning strike in North America, in real time.
posted by theodolite on Jun 23, 2014 - 46 comments

Kilroy is HERE.

The Google Street Art Project is an online collection and exhibition about the history, locations and artists of street art. Explore all the street art exhibits by place, artist, collection, medium, and more. Part of the Google Cultural Institute.
posted by Room 641-A on Jun 20, 2014 - 1 comment

The T in February, backwards and forwards.

An interactive visualization of Boston's subway system in February. With it, you can see where trains on the red, blue, and orange lines were at any moment on February 3 were in space and along their paths between stations, among many other things. [more inside]
posted by ignignokt on Jun 10, 2014 - 29 comments

Canonical Comical Cartography; or, The Batcave is in New Jersey

The Cartographer Who Mapped Out Gotham City from Smithsonian Magazine. A look at a real-life map of a fictional city. Illustrator Eliot Brown "didn’t just design the city; he designed an implicit history that writers are still exploring."
posted by HonoriaGlossop on Jun 9, 2014 - 39 comments

Jedi is not the 2nd most popular religion in any state? How disapointing

The second-largest religion in each state
Christianity is by far the largest religion in the United States; more than three-quarters of Americans identify as Christians. A little more than half of us identify as Protestants, about 23 percent as Catholic and about 2 percent as Mormon. But what about the rest of us?
posted by davidstandaford on Jun 5, 2014 - 104 comments

Within Sight And Gunshot

This indignant map exposes the seamy underbelly of 1890s Washington, D.C., naming and locating “saloons” and “bawdy-houses” in the so-called Murder Bay neighborhood, located east of the White House. The Library of Congress, which holds the map, tells us that it’s a newspaper clipping from the 1890s, without a known author or publisher. (Slate.com)
posted by The Whelk on May 15, 2014 - 14 comments

The third-most spoken language in the U.S. overall? Chinese.

What language does your state speak?
posted by and they trembled before her fury on May 14, 2014 - 119 comments

The Evolution of London, mapped through its roadways

In seven minutes, you can see the evolution of London, as seen in its road network, from the Roman port city of Londonium through the Anglo-Saxon, Tudor, Stuart, Early Georgian and Late Georgian, Early Victorian and Late Victorian, Early 20th Century and Postwar London, set to the scale of the 600 square miles of modern London, though the original city core is a very dense square mile. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 10, 2014 - 15 comments

Vikings vs Creepers

The entire country of Denmark has been recreated in Minecraft. The Danish Geodata Agency has released a 1:1 model of the country of Denmark in Minecraft, complete with buildings and roads. The full model is made up of approximately 4000 billion blocks and takes up a hefty 1TB of hard drive space (first link contains Google Translated links to the agency's website where you can download the map in blocks of 10 km x 10 km).
posted by daniel_charms on Apr 25, 2014 - 25 comments

*The New York Yankees were removed to make this map possible.

Up Close on Baseball's Borders is a detailed, zoomable interactive map which uses data from Facebook to present the team preferences of baseball fandom in the United States. Around the end of March, Facebook had released a map using the same data which despite being touted as most accurate ever, had significant problems. The most notable of these issues was a colorshift introduced as the main graphic went viral, rendering the map illegible. [more inside]
posted by mwhybark on Apr 24, 2014 - 183 comments

Nobody lives here.

Nik Freeman has created a map, based on census data, to illustrate the 47% of the United States where nobody lives.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 21, 2014 - 113 comments

Cyber Threats Map

Cyber Threat Real-Time Map. This Map Tracks Cyberattacks Around the World in Real Time. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Apr 1, 2014 - 10 comments

The NYPL's Open Maps Project adds 20,000 High Res Maps

The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high resolution cartographic works (maps!) for free, to view and download. "We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions." All can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page and downloaded through their Map Warper. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2014 - 11 comments

European Word Translator

Enter a word in english to display translations on a map. via
posted by Brent Parker on Mar 29, 2014 - 52 comments

Roll for initiative.

The Only Fantasy World Map You'll Ever Need.
posted by fings on Mar 19, 2014 - 100 comments

From the... erm... more than 5 boroughs.

Who is each borough of London's best selling music act? [more inside]
posted by panaceanot on Mar 6, 2014 - 29 comments

Grateful Dead vs. Phish and Other Distinctions

Music Machinery presents a map of each U.S. state's most distinct favorite band or recording artist, as well as an app for playing with the data.
posted by Navelgazer on Feb 26, 2014 - 75 comments

Al Jazeera tracks the violence and the unfolding humanitarian tragedy

Mapping Central African Republic's bloodshed
posted by infini on Feb 21, 2014 - 1 comment

A cartographic history of why North, not East or South, is up

How the north ended up on top of the map is an article by Nick Danforth, author/curator of (The/Mid) Afternoon Map blog, detailing how the north-up orientation came to be the default orientation, looking beyond Eurocentrism to Byzantine monks and Majorcan Jews who set the path for modern cartography. If you want more information, you might enjoy the Wikipedia article on the history of cartography, or you can really dig deep with the three-volume text, The History of Cartography, which is available in full from the University of Chicago Press online, split into individual PDFs for each chapter. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 18, 2014 - 28 comments

mapschool

mapschool [via mefi projects]
posted by aniola on Feb 4, 2014 - 15 comments

A Map of Hip America

What is the Williamsburg of your city? [SLGawker]
posted by Rock Steady on Jan 31, 2014 - 148 comments

Our year in weather, 2013 edition.

A one-year timelapse of global weather, described. [more inside]
posted by pjern on Jan 30, 2014 - 13 comments

He got 20 years for lovin' her / from some Oklahoma governor

Ever been to Johnsburg, Illinois? Have you received a Christmas card from a hooker in Minneapolis? Maybe you left Waukegan at the slamming of the door? Or perhaps you were simply full of wonder when you left Murfreesboro. If so, the Tom Waits map is for you.
posted by scody on Jan 17, 2014 - 60 comments

What four commonly used projections do, as shown on a human head

Maps can help make sense of the world, but they can also distory your sense of reality (Archive.org stream view, page 58 of Elements of Map Projection with Applications to Map and Chart Construction). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 13, 2014 - 26 comments

Here Be Duck Trees

An interactive version of Olaus Magnus’ 1539 Carta Marina, a map of the sea filled with the usual ( and unusual) monsters and creatures. (Slate)
posted by The Whelk on Dec 29, 2013 - 3 comments

A spectacular historical atlas refashioned for the 21st century

Here you will find one of the greatest historical atlases: Charles O. Paullin and John K. Wright's Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, first published in 1932. This digital edition reproduces all of the atlas's nearly 700 maps. Many of these beautiful maps are enhanced here in ways impossible in print, animated to show change over time or made clickable to view the underlying data—remarkable maps produced eight decades ago with the functionality of the twenty-first century.
posted by cthuljew on Dec 28, 2013 - 8 comments

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