611 posts tagged with Maps.
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Ziphius, rumored to slice boats in half with its dorsal fin

Toronto-based artist Bailey Henderson sculpts the fearsome sea creatures depicted on medieval and Renaissance-era maps. [more inside]
posted by Faint of Butt on Feb 8, 2016 - 13 comments

The Road Everyone Hates

Chaz Hutton Draws Graphs: Most recently "A Map Of Every City."
posted by The Whelk on Jan 24, 2016 - 25 comments

American Panorama

"American Panorama is an historical atlas of the United States for the twenty-first century. It combines cutting-edge research with innovative interactive mapping techniques, designed to appeal to anyone with an interest in American history or a love of maps." [more inside]
posted by dancestoblue on Jan 21, 2016 - 3 comments

Selective Blindness in Google Earth and Google Maps

Sorry we have no imagery here: Self censorship in Google geographical images Google's original mission statement from 1998 stated was to: “organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful” [more inside]
posted by Faintdreams on Jan 20, 2016 - 17 comments

The Life of Poo

The San Francisco sewer system is an amazing feat of engineering. Almost entirely gravity-run, it directs both stormwater and wastewater into a combined system of pipes that flow to wastewater treatment facilities. In the Life of Poo, you can type in an address in San Francisco and see where your toilet waste flows.
[more inside] posted by parrishioner on Jan 14, 2016 - 44 comments

Explore a little world from the comfort of your home

Hamburg's Miniatur Wonderland has been featured on Metafilter before (1, 2) but now you can explore 9 of its sections as if you were there with Google Maps.
posted by jontyjago on Jan 13, 2016 - 14 comments

First X, Then Y, Now Z : Landmark Thematic Maps and Their Makers

This section reads as would a biblical genealogy of sorts: Alexander von Humboldt (wiki) taught Heinrich Berghaus (short wiki bio)and influenced Alexander Keith Johnston; Berghaus taught August Petermann (wiki); and Petermann collaborated with Berghaus and Johnston. More accurately, it reflects the passing on of the thematic torch lit by Humboldt. There were isolated “ignitions” throughout Europe before him—he, of course, was not the first to construct a thematic map or even to think of how one might do it—but every science needs a founding figure. More than anyone who preceded him, Humboldt provided that role.
Landmark Thematic Atlases, from Princeton University Library's Historic Maps Collection website of Landmark Thematic Maps.
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 11, 2016 - 2 comments

New Zealand is not a small country but a large village...

World Maps without New Zealand
posted by blue_beetle on Dec 22, 2015 - 83 comments

All Roads Lead to Rome(s)

Every cell of this grid contains the starting point to one of our journeys to Rome. Now that we have our 486,713 starting points we need to find out how we could reach Rome as our destination. For this we created a algorithm that calculates one route for every trip. The more often a single street segment is used, the stronger it is drawn on the map. The maps as outcome of this project is somewhere between information visualization and data art, unveiling mobility and a very large scale.
Some beautiful and interesting visualizations of transportation models for Europe and the world, including all the towns called "Rome" in the United States. Also: Urban Mobility Fingerprints and Create Your Own (Europe Only).
posted by Rumple on Dec 10, 2015 - 10 comments

An illustrator in Dali, China

Jason Pym is a British illustrator who has been living in Dali, China for 11 years. His love for his adopted city in an idyllic part of Yunnan province is plain to see. He also makes illustrations for Penguin Books China, and labels for his wife's homemade jam, featuring cos-playing dragons. (Here's a link in Chinese with more dragon-goodness.)
posted by of strange foe on Dec 10, 2015 - 7 comments

Global weather

Windyty is a very pretty way of visualising current and forecast weather data from around the globe.
posted by Dim Siawns on Nov 30, 2015 - 11 comments

Therapihkal

In the early 1960's, drugs like LSD and psilocybin found their way out of university labs and onto the street -- and their value as medicine was lost as their status as protest and party drugs emerged. Mass recreational use, conservative political forces and a continuing media frenzy ensured the vilification of hallucinogens – until drugs like LSD and magic mushrooms were completely outlawed in 1970. Serious medical research would not begin again until the early 21st century, four decades later.
Turn on, tune in, and heal thyself - CBC's Ideas presents High Culture, a 3-hour (2--3) series examining the use of psychedelics to curb anxiety, alcoholism, and depression. [more inside]
posted by mannequito on Nov 26, 2015 - 22 comments

“As though the New Jersey suburbs were grafted onto South Carolina”

10 ways to map Northern Virginia. 12 ways to map the midwest. Which states are in "The South?"
posted by schmod on Nov 24, 2015 - 89 comments

Sketches Tolkien Used to Build Middle-Earth

"HOW DID J.R.R. Tolkien create The Lord of the Rings? The simple answer is that he wrote it. He sat down in a chair in 1937 and spent more than a dozen years working on what remains a masterwork of fantasy literature and a genius stroke of immersive worldbuilding. The more complicated answer is that in addition to writing the story, he drew it. The many maps and sketches he made while drafting The Lord of the Rings informed his storytelling, allowing him to test narrative ideas and illustrate scenes he needed to capture in words. For Tolkien, the art of writing and the art of drawing were inextricably intertwined." [more inside]
posted by SpacemanStix on Oct 10, 2015 - 15 comments

We found love in a Hopeless Pass

@sadtopographies: An Instagram account cataloging the most unfortunately named places on Earth, from Shades of Death Road in New Jersey to Mamungkukumpurangkuntjunya (or "Where the devil urinates") Hill in Australia and everywhere in between.
posted by Cash4Lead on Oct 9, 2015 - 12 comments

Novel geography

The Map of Literature. Martin Vargic, creator of the Map of the Internet 1.0, has created an insanely detailed "National Geographic" map of Literature, where "Jurassic Park is located between 1984 and Clear and Present Danger on the continent of Thrillers, a stone's throw away from H.G. Wells's War of the Worlds." [more inside]
posted by storybored on Oct 6, 2015 - 6 comments

Daredevil unavailable for comment.

"In August we asked readers to settle age-old disputes and draw where their neighborhoods begin and end. More than 12,000 New Yorkers responded, drawing maps in more than 280 neighborhoods and giving us a pretty detailed look at the local geography."
posted by griphus on Oct 1, 2015 - 27 comments

…and about South Loop. Nobody seems to agree what that is.

This is where Chicagoans say the borders of their neighborhoods are. Crowdsourced cartography from residents asked to draw their neighborhood. [more inside]
posted by nebulawindphone on Sep 28, 2015 - 25 comments

True Tube Topography

Thanks to a Freedom of Information request, Transport for London have released a geogrphically-accurate map of the tube. [PDF] [more inside]
posted by schmod on Sep 18, 2015 - 22 comments

Like Sim City, but without all the fun parts

Open GeoFiction is a user-editable map of a fictional world built on top of the Open StreetMap platform. [more inside]
posted by baniak on Sep 14, 2015 - 10 comments

Usually the author happens to have a map on hand

How exactly does one go about making a map of a make-believe place? [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 14, 2015 - 13 comments

It’s where you’ve been living this whole time.

The True Size Of… is an interactive demonstration of the limitations of the Mercator projection. [more inside]
posted by zamboni on Sep 8, 2015 - 45 comments

Mapping the beautiful chaos of informal transit

As transit systems go, the matatus in Nairobi exist somewhere between underground gypsy cabs and MTA bus service. The minibuses themselves aren't owned by any government agency. The fares aren't regulated by the city. The routes are vaguely based on a bus network that existed in Nairobi some 30 years ago, but they've since shifted and multiplied and expanded at the region's edges... Riders who navigate the matatu system rely on it in parts, using only the lines they know and the unofficial stops they're sure actually exist. As for the network as a whole – there's never even been a map of it... In the absence of a formal public transit system in Kenya's capital, people have created a comprehensive – if imperfect – one on their own. And now we know that it looks like this. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Aug 27, 2015 - 21 comments

United States of Emoji

Which emoji does each state use more than others?* [more inside]
posted by box on Aug 20, 2015 - 16 comments

A Time-Honored Tradition

Draw Where You Think Your [NYC] Neighborhood Borders Are on This Map
posted by griphus on Aug 11, 2015 - 39 comments

An In-Depth History of One Block of Greene Street in SoHo, NYC

The entirety of Greene Street in SoHo is pretty short, as New York City streets go -- just five blocks long. Walk along it today between Houston and Prince Streets and you’ll pass an Apple Store, a Ralph Lauren store, and a variety of other high-end retailers. A hundred and forty years ago, you’d be walking by brothels. A new website, The Greene Street Project: A Long History of a Short Block, covers more than four hundred years of that one block section -- just 486 feet long -- illustrated with photographs, maps, newspaper clippings, survey data, and charts. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 6, 2015 - 4 comments

Mapping the United Swears of America

Hell, damn and bitch are especially popular in the south and southeast. Douche is relatively common in northern states. Bastard is beloved in Maine and New Hampshire, and those states – together with a band across southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas – are the areas of particular motherfucker favour. Crap is more popular inland, fuck along the coasts. Fuckboy – a rising star* – is also mainly a coastal thing, so far. from Strong Language via Kottke [NSFW language, natch]
posted by chavenet on Jul 30, 2015 - 104 comments

Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips

Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature's Most Epic Road Trips
"The...map is the result of a painstaking and admittedly quixotic effort to catalog the country as it has been described in the American road-tripping literature. It includes every place-name reference in 12 books about cross-country travel...and maps the authors' routes on top of one another. You can track an individual writer's descriptions of the landscape as they traveled across it, or you can zoom in to see how different authors have written about the same place at different times."
[more inside] posted by kirkaracha on Jul 23, 2015 - 22 comments

Men died in the pursuit of better maps.

"Inside the crates were maps, thousands of them. In the top right corner of each one, printed in red, was the Russian word секрет. Secret" -- Inside the Secret World of Russia’s Cold War Mapmakers by Greg Miller, WIRED
posted by The Whelk on Jul 18, 2015 - 21 comments

You're no Ferdinand Magellan

Smarty Pins is a trivia game played with Google Maps
posted by desjardins on Jul 16, 2015 - 21 comments

Underwater street views

Underwater pics mapped. Google Maps teamed up with XL Catlin Seaview Survey, NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, and the Chagos Conservation Trust to put together an assortment of underwater views to explore. Previously. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Jun 8, 2015 - 3 comments

"More indigenous territory has been claimed by maps than by guns"

Jordan Engel's Decolonial Atlas project aims to restore indigenous place names to global maps overwritten by colonialism. On Tumblr too.
posted by Miko on May 29, 2015 - 36 comments

Putting pins in a map is something I've loved doing for many years

Printing a wall-sized world map and what I've learned from it : One man's epic journey to possess a wall-sized world map, which he loves.
posted by swift on Apr 30, 2015 - 59 comments

The Passport Power Index

The Passport Index is an interactive tool, which collects, displays and ranks the passports of the world, based on how many countries their holders can visit without obtaining a visa before arrival or at all.
posted by damayanti on Apr 16, 2015 - 51 comments

Bad Maps

Maps can illuminate our world; they can enlighten us and make us see things differently; they can show how demographics, history, or countless other factors interact with human and physical geography. But, sometimes, maps can be utter disasters, either because they're wrong or simply very dumb. Here are a collection of maps so hilariously bad that you may never trust the form again. [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Mar 15, 2015 - 25 comments

"The accuracy of the sea came at the cost of the land."

That’s how I feel about the web these days. We have a map, but it’s not for me. So I am distanced. It feels like things are distorted. I am consistently confused. — Frank Chimero, on What Screens Want
posted by iamkimiam on Mar 5, 2015 - 31 comments

LA's cultural and historical legacy: more than being able to turn right at a red light

HistoricPlacesLA is the first online information and management system specifically created to inventory, map, and help protect the City of Los Angeles' significant historic resources. It showcases the city's diversity of historic resources, including architecturally significant buildings and places of social importance as well as historic districts, bridges, parks, and streetscapes. You can search for specifics or try some popular seaches, and the map view let's you combine different overlays and base maps.
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 28, 2015 - 6 comments

cybermapping

40 maps that explain the internet
posted by infini on Feb 23, 2015 - 10 comments

Mladjov's Historical Maps

Bronze Age maps. Maps of Ancient Greece and Rome, India and China. Maps of the Viking era, the Crusades, and the High Middle Ages. Maps of Asia after the Mongol conquest, of Mexico before the Spanish conquest—dozens upon dozens of intricate historical maps.
posted by Iridic on Feb 17, 2015 - 19 comments

Strange Fire Area

Communi-bear Silo State! United States of Lions! Snow Wizards! This is Earth A-D, the world of Kamandi. (Click for glorious large size version.) [more inside]
posted by ignignokt on Feb 8, 2015 - 29 comments

Which Country Reads the Most?

A map showing the reading habits of 10 countries. For comparison, number of books published per capita in Europe.
posted by Alexandra Michelle on Feb 4, 2015 - 32 comments

Sorry, Canada

Reddit user TeaDranks has made a map of the world resizing every country in proportion to its population. The results are fascinating. NPR has a look. As originally seen on Reddit.
posted by DirtyOldTown on Jan 28, 2015 - 103 comments

Random Game Map Maker

Dave's Mapper automatically generates tiled RPG/adventure game maps by recombining tiles submitted by artists, with a pile of customization map generation options. Have fun and be inspired, or submit your own tiles.
posted by Jimbob on Jan 28, 2015 - 14 comments

"The Solution to Pollution is Dilution"

Chemical Weapons Munitions Dumped at Sea: An Interactive Map [via]
posted by indubitable on Jan 21, 2015 - 27 comments

The OED in two minutes

The OED in two minutes is a visualisation of the change and growth of the English language since 1150, showing the frequency and origin of new words year by year. Notes and explanations about the project. [more inside]
posted by dng on Jan 8, 2015 - 18 comments

Ordnance Survey Maps - England and Wales, 1842-1952

Ordnance Survey Maps - England and Wales, 1842-1952: ‘The most comprehensive, topographic mapping covering all of England and Wales from the 1840s to the 1950s,’ courtesy of the National Library of Scotland. You can browse the maps as individual sheets using a zoomable map of England and Wales; as a seamless zoomable overlay layer on modern Google and OS maps; or as a seamless zoomable layer side-by-side with modern Google and OS maps. Also, Maps of Scotland: ‘Access high-resolution zoomable images of over 91,000 maps of Scotland and beyond.’
posted by misteraitch on Jan 4, 2015 - 26 comments

I'm not your buddy, bro. I'm not your bro, dude. I'm not your dude, pal

Texas is bro country. But the term also covers the entirety of Oklahoma, and almost all of Louisiana and Arkansas, plus good chunks of Kansas and New Mexico. A mid-sized gathering of bros straddles the Michigan-Indiana border, and a tiny bro community lives by the seaside on either side of the Virginia-North Carolina state line.
American regional variations in what you call your male best friends. By Frank Jacobs.
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 3, 2015 - 94 comments

We ran into a data set and there we got upshot

Flowing Data's kind-of annual entry into the "best of" season: Their picks for best data visualisations of 2014. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Dec 22, 2014 - 2 comments

I used to pedal my bike up Snake Road and trap muskrats in the salt pond

Following Hook Creek past ghost towns and discarded highways to the lost waterways of New York City. - By Nathan Kensinger
posted by Potomac Avenue on Dec 5, 2014 - 2 comments

Catching the catchers

GlobalFishingWatch is a new tool that shows every traceable commercial fishing boat in the world nearly real time. Blinking lights video with a narrator. 9 out of every 10 big fish in the ocean is caught by humans.
posted by stbalbach on Nov 15, 2014 - 13 comments

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