104 posts tagged with MentalHealth.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 104. Subscribe:

What is thy name?

"Humans as Superorganisms: How Microbes, Viruses, Imprinted Genes and Other Selfish Entities Shape Our Behavior" by Peter Kramer and Paola Bressan discusses the idea that an individual homo sapiens is only one component of the human superorganism we call a person, focusing on the psychological and psychiatric ramifications thereof. (Paola Bressan previously.)
posted by save alive nothing that breatheth on Jul 27, 2015 - 16 comments

semicolon tattoo

“A semicolon is used when an author could’ve chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life." [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 14, 2015 - 48 comments

"...and I realized that it was a really beautiful day."

"Child actor-turned-maligned-Star-Trek-character-turned-geek-icon Wil Wheaton has been fairly open about his struggles with mental illness and depression. But for those who haven’t heard about that side of his life before, Project UROK spoke with the actor/writer about the way his anxiety affects him and why he eventually chose to seek help. We’re debuting that interview exclusively here on The A.V. Club." By Caroline Siede; direct YouTube link. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 25, 2015 - 42 comments

I breathe deeply, banish all distractions, and focus on the chicken.

For the past few years, a small group of psychiatrists, researchers, educators, and game designers have run a quiet but intense footrace to become the first to earn FDA approval for a medically sound, prescription-strength video game for ADHD. That’s not a metaphor. They are seeking approval for a game that a doctor can actually prescribe..
In this excerpt from his new book, posted on Medium, journalist Greg Toppo discusses a variety of new neurogames and how they may in the future treat conditions like ADHD and anxiety, strengthen skills like multitasking and mindfulness, and reduce the need for pharmaceutical interventions for children. (Fair warning, the article has an animated header image that may annoy, so you may want to scroll right on down past it before you start reading.)
posted by Stacey on May 11, 2015 - 11 comments

Life, And Death, Instagram, Unfiltered

On Instagram, Madison Holleran's life looked ideal: Star athlete, bright student, beloved friend. But the photos hid the reality of someone struggling to go on. "Maddy, have you found a therapist down there yet?" he asked. "No, but don't worry, Daddy, I'll find one," she told him. But she had no intention of finding one. In fact, she was, at that exact moment, buying the items she would leave for her family. [more inside]
posted by Major Matt Mason Dixon on May 8, 2015 - 39 comments

Kevin Hines, Golden Gate Bridge survivor

In September 2000, a teenager suffering from Bipolar Disorder named Kevin Hines attempted suicide by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. A confluence of fortunate events (such as a Good Samaritan Sea Lion) came together and Kevin not only survived but did not suffer major mobility loss, as many other people who survive the fall do. Today he works as a suicide prevention/mental health awareness advocate and has authored a memoir. He is featured in the 2006 documentary The Bridge.
posted by MattMangels on Mar 5, 2015 - 10 comments

When Mentally Ill Students Feel Alone

Following the apparent suicide of an undergraduate student, Yale University's community is grappling with questions and concerns about the school's handling of students with mental illnesses. In ""When Mentally Ill Students Feel Alone", The Atlantic discusses the school's policies, how they may be discouraging students from taking needed time off to address mental illness, and broader questions about the rise of mental health diagnoses on college campuses and how universities can better address their students' mental health needs.
posted by Stacey on Mar 4, 2015 - 20 comments

Sadness is a legitimate emotion.

Pre-therapy, this is the only thing I was ever taught, implicitly and explicitly, about sadness: It is bad.

You do not want it. If you've got it, you should definitely try to get rid of it, fast as possible. Whatever you do, don't subject other people to it, because they do not like that.

Sadness can be legitimately problematic, absolutely. If your sadness comes from seemingly no place or even an obvious place but keeps you from participating in life or enjoying anything and refuses to abate no matter how long you go on letting it express itself, you of course can't keep living like that. But culturally, we aren't allowed to be sad even for a little while. Even when it's perfectly sensible. Even when, sometimes, we need it.
Journalist and author Mac McClelland explores the relationship between recovering from PTSD and learning how to live in the presence of sadness: How I Learned To Be OK With Feeling Sad. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Mar 2, 2015 - 54 comments

Mostly As, Bs and Cs

Quiz: what mental disorder do you have? (adjusted for scientific accuracy)
posted by Artw on Feb 19, 2015 - 27 comments

“There is such a thing as the courage in remaining baffled.”

Donald Antrim and the Art of Anxiety by John Jeremiah Sullivan [New York Times]
posted by Fizz on Oct 1, 2014 - 10 comments

The point is that I am in here, somewhere: cogito ergo sum.

"Let’s note that I write this while experiencing psychosis, and that much of this has been written during a strain of psychosis known as Cotard’s delusion, in which the patient believes that she is dead. What the writer’s confused state means to either of us is not beside the point, because it is the point. The point is that I am in here, somewhere: cogito ergo sum." (via)
posted by hat_eater on Sep 16, 2014 - 20 comments

The effects of untreated PTSD in inner-city communities

Over the past 20 years, medical researchers have found new ways to quantify the effects of the relentless violence on America’s inner cities, [and are] only now beginning to trace the effects of untreated PTSD on neighborhoods that are already struggling with unemployment, poverty and the devastating impact of the war on drugs. [...] Despite the growing evidence of PTSD in civilians, little is being done to address the problem. Hospital trauma centers often provide adequate care for physical wounds, but do almost nothing to help patients cope with the mental and emotional aftermath of trauma.
posted by gemutlichkeit on Sep 8, 2014 - 33 comments

America's Mental Health Crisis

Brave and afraid and heading down the longest road [Part 1/3] The cars made a wet rushing sound as they swept past him, close enough that he could feel their motion in the air. He was certain if he tried, he could reach out and touch them. Mike Bourne stretched out both arms, fingertips extended. He was walking in the middle of the busy street. The yellow line on the pavement told him where to go. He thought of it as the yellow brick road. It would take him somewhere, he knew, somewhere beautiful. [more inside]
posted by ellieBOA on Aug 27, 2014 - 16 comments

You're 16. You're a pedophile. What do you do now?

Inside a group of young paedophiles and their fight to stop themselves from offending. Needless to say, trigger warning. [more inside]
posted by nerdfish on Aug 11, 2014 - 62 comments

Cross-cultural experiences of schizophrenia

A new study by Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann and others found that voice-hearing experiences of people with serious psychotic disorders are shaped by local culture – in the United States, the voices are harsh and threatening; in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful. This may have clinical implications for how to treat people with schizophrenia, she suggests.
posted by Rumple on Jul 19, 2014 - 24 comments

There’s lots of brutality...Horrible brutality.

Rikers: Where Mental Illness Meets Brutality in Jail [more inside]
posted by jammy on Jul 14, 2014 - 11 comments

Do you have a plan to harm yourself or anyone else?

If I were going to pull a Virginia Tech or a Columbine,” he said, “I wouldn’t tell you about it, would I?
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jul 5, 2014 - 50 comments

A Canadian perspective on the Memphis Crisis Intervention Team model

The Walrus magazine looks into Toronto police shootings of the mentally ill and the Memphis Crisis Intervention Team model:

Memphis, one-quarter of Toronto’s size but with a homicide rate nine times higher, has developed a progressive approach to de-escalate high-tension confrontations, improve police attitudes toward those suffering from mental illness, and divert them from the criminal justice system. The Memphis Crisis Intervention Team model centres on dispatching specially trained beat cops to emergency calls as quickly as possible, and giving them the authority to take charge of the scene. That approach triggered a revolution in policing that has now been emulated in 2,700 jurisdictions across the US, including large urban centres such as Chicago and Los Angeles. A handful of Canadian cities, among them Hamilton and Vancouver, have also adopted the CIT model. While the TPS has not, senior officials claim that all of its 5,500 uniformed officers receive some training in how to handle mental illness, which makes the recent proliferation of shootings that much more perplexing.
posted by porn in the woods on Jul 3, 2014 - 11 comments

AND ON THIS DAY, I WILL GIVE THE FISH A WALK AND A BATH

Breaking The Low Mood Cycle - a guest post at Captain Awkward discusses how to change your behavior to feel good about yourself and be better at doing you. The post has a humorous tone, reminiscent of Allie Brosh.
posted by desjardins on Jun 30, 2014 - 32 comments

A disturbance of the life-bearing wind that supports the mind

Maybe we shouldn't be so quick to recommend meditation over on the green. [more inside]
posted by Athanassiel on Jun 29, 2014 - 48 comments

How can I move forward in my life if I never know what I'm dealing with?

Why Chicago’s MasterChef Star Killed Himself
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jun 26, 2014 - 36 comments

NHS Prescribes Books for Better Health

Bibliotherapy:
From June 2013, a new scheme, Reading Well Books on Prescription will be available in libraries throughout England. This new scheme has been developed by The Reading Agency and The Society of Chief Librarians and aims to bring reading's healing benefits to the 6 million people with anxiety, depression and other mild to moderate mental health illnesses. There is growing evidence showing that self-help reading can help people with certain mental health conditions get better. Reading Well Books on Prescription will enable GPs and mental health professionals to prescribe patients cognitive behavioural therapy through a visit to the library. Here they can get books to help them understand and manage conditions from depression to chronic pain.
More on the program from the Boston Globe. Previously.
posted by MonkeyToes on Jun 25, 2014 - 6 comments

found mike

A videoblogger from the U.K. named Jonny Benjamin started a social media campaign called #FindMike to track down the stranger who convinced him not to end his life in 2008.

Earlier this year, Benjamin found "Mike" (whose real name is Neil Laybourn) with help of Rethink Mental Illness, the organization that helped launch Benjamin's search. In the video, you can watch their heartwarming reunion.
posted by yeoz on Mar 13, 2014 - 6 comments

Work Makes You Sick: Speed Ups on the Academic Assembly Line

Mental health problems are on the rise among UK academics amid the pressures of greater job insecurity, constant demand for results and an increasingly marketised higher education system. [more inside]
posted by eviemath on Mar 7, 2014 - 22 comments

Give me a stick and I can stay alive!

Discover how to get out of bed and do things again with these spiffy new tips from 21 Comics That Capture the Frustrations of Depression! Or pull a blanket over your head and pretend you're the last person on earth curled up in a nice, warm cave. Whatever.
posted by byanyothername on Sep 22, 2013 - 89 comments

The Real Monsters

Artist Toby Allen has created fantastic faces for monsters which many are all too familiar with: Anxiety, Avoidant Personality Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depression, Paranoia, Dissociative Identity Disorder, And Social Anxiety. [via]
posted by quin on Sep 20, 2013 - 18 comments

I Keep My Bipolar Disorder Secret at Work

The most frustrating part of my situation is that I can count on one hand the number of people who know about my mental illness. The stigma that surrounds mental health is suffocating, and I don’t feel comfortable talking about it with most of my friends and family, and certainly not my boss or colleagues. Writer opens up about mental illness stigma in the workplace.
posted by rcraniac on Aug 23, 2013 - 35 comments

A brother in trouble.

A brother in trouble. Author John Niven reflects on the suicide of his brother.
posted by ClanvidHorse on Aug 18, 2013 - 15 comments

"For some, suicidal intent is a terminal illness"

Suicide prevention has become a key focus of public and private mental health initiatives in recent years. And as we previously have seen, in many cases suicide is not an inevitable outcome for people experiencing suicidal ideation or even those who have made a suicidal attempt. Still, the question remains: is every suicide preventable? [more inside]
posted by drlith on Aug 5, 2013 - 65 comments

This is not a bad place, not the hell it had been..."

"Founded in 1912 as a farm colony of Brooklyn State Hospital, the Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens [New York] became, by mid-century, a world unto itself. At its peak, it housed some 7,000 patients. They tended gardens and raised livestock on the hospital’s grounds. The hospital contained gymnasiums, a swimming pool, a theater, a television studio, and giant kitchens and laundries where patients were put to work. Today, Creedmoor, still run by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has only a few hundred patients" and houses The Living Museum, an 'art asylum within an asylum' where patients can create and exhibit their art. But what is life like inside the institution itself? In 2010, Katherine B. Olsen spent weeks interviewing staff and patients. Her essay, published this week, 'Something More Wrong' takes us inside Creedmoor's women's ward. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 29, 2013 - 7 comments

How A War Hero Became A Serial Bank Robber

How A War Hero Became A Serial Bank Robber. "Army medic Nicholas Walker returned home from Iraq after 250 combat missions, traumatized and broken. His friends and family couldn’t help him. Therapy couldn’t help him. Heroin couldn’t help him. Pulling bank heists helped him." [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jun 10, 2013 - 32 comments

There is no "Why?"

Stephen Fry: I tried to kill myself last year
posted by Artw on Jun 5, 2013 - 115 comments

Chris Kyle's Tragic Quest to Help Troubled Veterans

In the Crosshairs: Chris Kyle, a decorated sniper, tried to help a troubled veteran. The result was tragic. [Previously, Via]
posted by homunculus on May 27, 2013 - 68 comments

America's mental health care crisis

Schizophrenic. Killer. My Cousin. "It's insanity to kill your father with a kitchen knife. It's also insanity to close hospitals, fire therapists, and leave families to face mental illness on their own." [Via]
posted by homunculus on Apr 29, 2013 - 25 comments

"So far, it’s chaos. It’s hard to evaluate how widespread this is."

“Compliance with treatment is a sketchy thing to begin with,” said Sam Muszynski, director of the office of health care systems and financing for the American Psychiatric Association. He fears that financial fallout may force some providers to disrupt care, leaving mentally unstable patients on their own temporarily -- or longer. “All it takes is one missed appointment,” he added. Changes instituted on January 1 to insurance claims codes have glitched the system by which mental health professionals get paid - prompting fear that many will have to stop providing care. More information on the changes to the codes.
posted by jbickers on Feb 7, 2013 - 8 comments

Positive energy YES!

Brody Stevens: Enjoy It! (2, 3, 4, 5, 6) is the story of cult comedian Brody Stevens—his friendship with Zach Galafianakis, his falling out with Chelsea Lately, his infamous "Twitter meltdown" and, of course, his credits.
posted by Lorin on Jan 26, 2013 - 13 comments

How I Fell in Love with a Schizophrenic

Kas Thomas writes about his "all-in" relationship with Sally, a woman diagnosed with schizophrenia. Yesterday, my true love, Sally, had a psychotic break and went into the (mental) hospital, where she'll probably be for the next two weeks. Today, I'm writing as a means of therapy. Therapy for me. I knew going into this relationship that it would entail ups and downs, and hard work... [more inside]
posted by winecork on Jan 1, 2013 - 86 comments

The Uneasy Relationship Between Mental Illness and Comedy

"There are plenty of reasons to recover from addiction, anxiety, depression, and trauma....But comedians are perverse people who often don't care about any of those things. So maybe this will convince them, and maybe this will convince me: get better — so you can get funny." In a frank, personal, and revealing article, essayist Jaime Lutz interviews comedians Marc Maron, Eddie Pepitone, Paul Gilmartin, and Anthony Atamanuik about the uneasy relationship between mental illness and comedy.
posted by scarylarry on Dec 14, 2012 - 9 comments

In a quiet room with a blade, it's only ever yourself you're trying to beat.

Press X not to Die - one woman's story of self-harm and videogaming
posted by mippy on Dec 12, 2012 - 17 comments

Coronet Instructional Films

From the mid 40s to the mid 50s Coronet Instructional Films were always ready to provide social guidance for teenagers on subjects as diverse as dating, popularity, preparing for being drafted, and shyness, as well as to children on following the law, the value of quietness in school, and appreciating our parents. They also provided education on topics such as the connection between attitudes and health, what kind of people live in America, how to keep a job, supervising women workers, the nature of capitalism, and the plantation System in Southern life. Inside is an annotated collection of all 86 of the complete Coronet films in the Prelinger Archives as well as a few more. Its not like you had work to do or anything right? [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Nov 1, 2012 - 41 comments

Is your brain feeling good today?

Did you know? Today is World Mental Health Day. World Mental Health Day was started by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1992 to raise awareness about mental health issues around the world. The World Federation for Mental Health has more information about this year's theme, Depression: A Global Crisis. Meanwhile, the Alternatives conference also starts today in Portland, Oregon. Now in its 26th year, this conference is the U.S.'s oldest national mental health conference organized and run for mental health consumers, offering tons of workshops on peer-delivered services and self-help/recovery methods. How will you celebrate World Mental Health Day? [more inside]
posted by docjohn on Oct 10, 2012 - 35 comments

You must always keep an open mind, in this business.

"How, I wonder, can a young woman who has grown up in this harsh environment, waking up early to fetch water, cook, clean, farm till late in the day, be suffering from depression? ... People don't get depressed in Nigeria."
posted by ChuraChura on Sep 5, 2012 - 71 comments

Virtual and Analog Art

Bryn Oh is staging an art exhibition called Virginia Alone simultaneously at the Santa Fe New Media Festival and in Second Life (free account required). [more inside]
posted by Deoridhe on Jul 13, 2012 - 2 comments

Is the Web Driving Us Mad?

Is the Web Driving Us Mad? (Newsweek, cover) Evidence wise, the verdict isn't looking good. The proof is starting to pile up. [more inside]
posted by stbalbach on Jul 11, 2012 - 112 comments

Managing, or Failing to Manage, an Epidemic of Mental Illness

There is a critical shortage of acute mental health services throughout the nation that is making it increasingly difficult for people who don't meet standards for "imminent danger" to receive adequate care. Barring a dramatic change in the systems that provide care, what alternatives are there for seriously mentally ill people? Incarceration has often become a form of care provision, but behavioral courts are an emerging alternative. (Previously.) [more inside]
posted by liketitanic on Jun 23, 2012 - 18 comments

Can Boggle help?

Boggle is worried about you! Boggle is also an owl. A cartoon owl offers advice about depression, anxiety and surviving abuse. [more inside]
posted by The demon that lives in the air on Jun 3, 2012 - 49 comments

"The one institution that can never say no to anybody is jail."

"If you think health care in America is bad, you should look at mental health care," says Steve Leifman, who works as a special advisor on criminal justice and mental health for the Florida Supreme Co " Fifty years ago, the U.S. had nearly 600,000 state hospital beds for people suffering from mental illness. Today, because of federal and state funding cuts, that number has dwindled to 40,000. When the government began closing state-run hospitals in the 1980s, people suffering from mental illness had nowhere to go. Without proper treatment and care, many ended up in the last place anyone wants to be." Of course, it's not just a problem confined to the US.
posted by dave78981 on Apr 1, 2012 - 69 comments

Spring Has Sprung

In 2003 a building housing the Massachusetts Mental Health Center (MMHC) was slated for demolition to make way for updated facilities. Artist Anna Schuleit was commissioned to memorialize its rich history. Schuleit: The concept for Bloom came to me as a site-specific installation to mark the transition of the life and history of the institution toward its closure, from its physical state to the remembered with 28,000 potted flowering plants. More images available here.
posted by ThePinkSuperhero on Mar 13, 2012 - 14 comments

People keep calling me Five Alive

In DSM 5- 'Living Document' or 'Dead on Arrival', Allen Frances, chair of the DSM-IV development committee details some of the problems with the DSM-5 development process and alludes to some of the current controversies. The post is part of his ongoing series DSM-5 In Distress. [more inside]
posted by OmieWise on Dec 2, 2011 - 37 comments

"I Will Never Again Harm Another Human Being"

Over the objections of federal prosecutors and Ronald Reagan's family, John Hinckley, Jr. is on the verge of freedom. "Which should prevail—the belief that anyone who tries to kill a President should never be free? Or a judicial system that rests on laws that spell out pathways to wellness and freedom for people deemed mentally ill when they commit violent acts?"
posted by yankeefog on Oct 14, 2011 - 100 comments

Page: 1 2 3