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Dubstep's great-great-grandad

More famous for helping to crack the Enigma code during World War 2, Alan Turing also created the first ever computer-generated musical notes in 1948. In 1951, a recording - the first ever of computer-generated music - was made at the BBC. The recording was restored this year at the University of Canterbury in new Zealand and can be heard here [mp3]. via @v21
posted by EndsOfInvention on Sep 27, 2016 - 12 comments

something like a cloud of sound

The 50 Best Ambient Albums of All Time [SL p4k] [more inside]
posted by holmesian on Sep 26, 2016 - 75 comments

Can’t stop what the Black Plot Design has done

The Black Plot (trigger warning for lyrics), the new song by stoner metal masters High On Fire, boasts a trippy, Heavy Metal-esque animated video by Skinner, the artist behind many Mastodon album covers and their cat-filled video for Asleep In The Deep.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Sep 25, 2016 - 9 comments

Summer is coming, or going; embrace your Beach Body with Parentz

Parentz invite you say hello or goodbye to summer with Beach Body, the music video for their vapory electro-pop + r & b single. It's warmer than their prior ice-pop/ moving-on-with-your-life-pop/ now-pop/ otter-pop/ whatever-pop EP FP&B<3Z1​:​FLY (music video: Fly) from 2013. They also have a future-pop EP, titled Big (music video: Back It Up), that they released in 2011.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 24, 2016 - 3 comments

September In the Rain

The leaves of brown came tumbling down
  Remember, in September, in the rain
  The sun went out just like a dying ember
  That September in the rain
posted by y2karl on Sep 23, 2016 - 27 comments

And color my world Black Gold

Violist and impresario Ashleigh Gordon talks to the Boston Globe about the problem she and her multimedia project Castle of our Skins had when they set out to perform works by black composers: “we could list on maybe one hand, between us, black composers that we knew of.” [more inside]
posted by Fritz Langwedge on Sep 23, 2016 - 2 comments

Add it up with JK Rowling

It wasn’t Gordon Gano who was the problem: it was me. I was listening with a ghostly eighteen year old ex-boyfriend at my shoulder, and behind him, a chorus of snarling early eighties NME journalists, all ready to jeer, because even if I like the Violent Femmes, I’ll like them in the wrong way. JK Rowling takes up ramalbumclub's challenge of listening to a well known album for the the first time and then writing about it: Violent Femmes from 1983. [more inside]
posted by rongorongo on Sep 22, 2016 - 46 comments

You Want It Darker by Leonard Cohen

They're lining up the prisoners
And the guards are taking aim

[more inside]
posted by tclark on Sep 21, 2016 - 36 comments

Musical Passage

We invite you to listen in on a musical gathering that took place in Jamaica in 1688. These three songs, 'Angola', 'Papa' and 'Koromanti', performed at a festival by enslaved African musicians and copied in musical notation by a Mr Baptiste, are the first transcription of African music in the Caribbean, and, indeed, probably in the Americas. Thanks to this remarkable artifact, we can listen to traces of music performed long ago and begin to imagine what it meant for the people who created it.
posted by verstegan on Sep 19, 2016 - 6 comments

The day the bleep bloops died

Fabric night club was founded in 1999. (An oral history for the 10th anniversary, a VICE article for the 15th.) For those outside the UK, Fabric might be better known for its long-running mix series. (A few best-ofs from Red Bull Music Academy, Thump, Blisspop, The Quietus, and Fabric’s staff.)
After two drug-related deaths, the club closed temporarily in August. On September 7, the Islington Council permanently revoked Fabric’s license. Eulogies and concerns about the policing of club culture (and one threatened MBE melting) have rolled in: Resident Advisor, NPR, The New York Times, The Guardian (drugs), The Guardian (club culture), Billboard, Fader. [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Sep 19, 2016 - 25 comments

Mndsgn: distilled cosmic soul funk from the early part of the decade

Mndsgn is pronounced mind design. The law calls him Ringgo Ancheta. He says his music has dirty, dirty soul vibes, but after checking out his video for Eggs (2014) and Cosmic Perspective (2016), you might agree with this interviewer and think that he might be a mystic jazz player who traveled to earth with Sun Ra. Any way it shakes out, enjoy Mndsgn's music on Bandcamp, and his new concept album*, Body Wash (YT playlist), or just hang out and have some breakfast with Ringgo, Knxwledge and The Koreatown Oddity, the first of five such breakfasts, via Boiler Room. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 17, 2016 - 2 comments

Updating the Voyager spacecraft Golden Record idea for 2016

Nearly 40 years ago, the two Voyager spacecraft left Earth. Aboard each was a time capsule of humanity for extraterrestrials: a golden record containing sounds and images portraying the diversity of life and culture on Earth, including a diagram of DNA, greetings in 55 languages, a map of our solar system's position relative to stellar landmarks, the sound of a kiss, Louis Armstrong's "Melancholy Blues" and "Dark Was the Night -- Cold Was The Ground" by Blind Willie Johnson. Since culture and technology don’t stand still, Science Friday asks: "If humanity were to send another Golden Record to the stars, what would it contain?" An expert panel will review submissions from the public, and a new Golden Record will be unveiled on October 7. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Sep 16, 2016 - 80 comments

I love my dog.

He's my dog. If you don't love my dog, that's okay. I don't want you to. He's my dog. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 15, 2016 - 40 comments

Guru of Peace: An Introduction to Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan

Broadcast on BBC Radio 6, and now available online, composer "Nitin Sawhney presents an introduction to his vocal hero, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, who was once dubbed the "Elvis of the East". ... He died at the age of 48 leaving a legacy of over 125 albums. ... His life and legacy is charted here with contributions from Peter Gabriel, his nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Gaudi, actor Michael Sheen, singer Rumer, DJ's Andy Kershaw and Nihal, and producer Jonathan Elias amongst others." Part I and Part II. [more inside]
posted by Celsius1414 on Sep 14, 2016 - 11 comments

Welcome to the Analog Upside-Down

The synth sound of Stranger Things, on the Roland Juno-6, Roland Juno 106, Sequential Circuits Prophet 5, MiniMoog Model D , and Ableton Live. Link via . Wandertalk covers the Stranger Things theme.
posted by thirteenthletter on Sep 14, 2016 - 19 comments

Rhiannon Giddens wins banjo prize named after some comedian

Since 2010, Steve Martin has endowed an eponymous prize "for excellence in banjo and bluegrass". The first six winners were white men, but the 2016 prize went to Rhiannon Giddens, a biracial woman who leads the Carolina Chocolate Drops. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Sep 14, 2016 - 20 comments

Every Bruce Springsteen Song, Ranked from 1-314

Just what it advertises in the title.
posted by COD on Sep 13, 2016 - 73 comments

Current Condition

Current Condition provides soothing vaporwave, folk music, and weather updates to smooth out your workday.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Sep 12, 2016 - 60 comments

Alan Jefferson's one man, self-made space opera, Galactic Nightmare

Alan Jefferson was inspired: he had heard War of the Worlds and wanted to make his own space epic, and he did, between 1979-1984, in his shed ("AJ Studios") in Hull. He wrote and played the music, wrote the story, narrates the story, sings the songs, made all the artwork, the poster, the storyfile etc. He started selling cassette copies of Galactic Nightmare in 1986 in the back of magazines such as C U Amiga and Future Music, but faded from view, with a few copies being traded by friends. Then a recording made its way to Trunk Records, who have now re-released the album, which you can now hear in full on YouTube.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 12, 2016 - 14 comments

The Marvel Symphonic Universe...

... or why all movie scores sound the same. Every Frame a Painting on the usage of temp music. Check out the supplementary video illustrating temp music usage.
posted by Foci for Analysis on Sep 12, 2016 - 50 comments

“Work is so never-ending, Rihanna had to repeat it five times in a row”

Ten members of the staff at Pitchfork have put together a list of “The Music That Helps Them Get Shit Done” (NB: Rihanna is not on the list.) [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Sep 12, 2016 - 36 comments

Xenia Rubinos

Xenia Rubinos is a songwriter and performer fom Hartford, CT, trained in jazz composition at Berklee, now living in Brooklyn, New York. Her music is an amalgam of R&B, noise, hip-hop and punk. It is often political, often danceable, and often both. She is currently on tour. More Rubinos music below the fold. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Sep 11, 2016 - 5 comments

Good life, good life

Roland, the Japanese manufacturer of electronic musical instruments, has announced faithful remakes of the iconic TB-303 bassline synthesizer, TR-909 drum machine, and VP-330 vocoder. The 303 and 909 in particular are revered in the worlds of house, acid, and techno, and are used on hundreds of records you know and love. Each have a distinct sound you can identify in a mix immediately. They're priced at $350-400, comparable to the low prices back when the gear was first released that made them attractive to unknown bedroom producers - while the originals go for thousands on the second-hand market today, affordable only for wealthy collectors and professionals. Peter Kirn dives in with impressions and offers a roundup of early comparisons and reviews. [more inside]
posted by naju on Sep 11, 2016 - 121 comments

About Ratboy Genius

Minuet of the Fishfood, and other matters concerning the Ratboy Genius.... [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Sep 10, 2016 - 5 comments

All Black Everything

Daveed Diggs, recent Tony Award Winner of “Hamilton” fame, just released an Afrofuturistic space opera-themed noise-rap concept album, Splendor & Misery, as part of his experimental rap collective, Clipping. [more inside]
posted by the_wintry_mizzenmast on Sep 10, 2016 - 35 comments

The King of Ska

Prince Buster, pioneer of ska and rocksteady music, died on Thursday at the age of 78.
posted by prize bull octorok on Sep 9, 2016 - 32 comments

A trip to the mythical Isle of Tiki, Polynesian Pop and A/C Eden

The bizarre rise and fall and resurgence of tiki bars and cocktails is an interesting history that starts with two men, Donn Beach and Victor Bergeron, who traveled to the South Pacific and brought back some "island culture" to the United States with them in the 1930s, continuing on with the craze really booming after WWII vets returned from tours overseas. With the ebbs and flows of popularity, the cultural appropriation in "Tiki culture" has often been overlooked, as to the Māori mythology and meaning behind Tiki carvings and imagery and Hawiian culture of leis and luaus. Let's talk Tiki bars: harmless fun or exploitation. [Soundtrack: Les Baxter's Ritual Of The Savage ( 1951) and Martin Denny's Exotica (1957)] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 9, 2016 - 60 comments

Doctor Who Fan Orchestra

Doctor Who Fan Orchestra [via mefi projects]
posted by aniola on Sep 9, 2016 - 6 comments

Let’s have another round tonight

Video games, of course, are lousy with taverns, and in taverns you will invariably encounter bards. Some are kind of lousy, some are really quite good, some won't stop singing about you, and a few might even be trying to kill you. If there's no bard around, you can make some music yourself! Grab a guitar (or a lute I guess) and a few of your friends. Sure, a few murder ballads might be nice while you drain a pint, but don't forget you can also sing while you work!
posted by selfnoise on Sep 9, 2016 - 12 comments

A pint of fear and home by teatime

Fundamentalist punk rock art collective The Mekons present their "hymn for Brexit," Fear & Beer. This track, like the rest of their new album Existentialism, was recorded on a single microphone in a single evening in front of a paying audience. The 75 attendees, dubbed the Mekoristers and credited by their names in the liner notes of the album, sang backing vocals in the style of Phil Minton's famous feral choirs. They become almost another instrument or sound effect — a distant, disconcerting drone or howl that permeates songs of political unrest and social chaos. Plus, you can dance to them (or simply shout along). [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Sep 8, 2016 - 14 comments

BLACK CLASSICAL - HISTORY OF SPIRITUAL JAZZ

Black Classical charts the history of spiritual jazz through a 12 hour mega-mix. [more inside]
posted by philip-random on Sep 7, 2016 - 10 comments

The Bjork Is Strong With This One

Steven Lear combines his favorite movies with his favorite album covers. Instagram.
posted by mattdidthat on Sep 7, 2016 - 8 comments

Drained of meaning

The premise of Jack Hamilton’s deep new study Just Around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination seems like something that’s been on rock history’s tongue for a long time without ever quite leaving it. Chuck Berry, a black man with a guitar, had been a rock and roll archetype in 1960, but by the end of the decade Jimi Hendrix would be seen as rock’s odd man out for being... a black man with a guitar. How did that occur? "Tracing the Rock and Roll Race Problem" an interview in Pitchfork.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 6, 2016 - 27 comments

Andy Kershaw’s Appalachian Journey

Earlier this year, BBC radio’s Andy Kershaw recreated Cecil Sharp’s 1916 song-collecting trip through Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee. Kershaw interviewed local musicians and made field recordings of their performances as he went along – just as Sharp had done 100 years before. You can hear the full programme here and extended sessions/interviews with Gillian Welch, Sheila Kay Adams and Elizabeth LaPrelle here. And don’t forget his web-only discussion of Sharp with Brian Peters and Martin Carthy here. [more inside]
posted by Paul Slade on Sep 5, 2016 - 14 comments

Steve Buscemi and Elliott Sharp ... If you know the right spells

Steve Buscemi began his career in, and continues to support experimental theater, writing and performance. Elliott Sharp is a central figure in the avant-garde music scene in New York City of over thirty years. The two have collaborated a few times in recent years, for example on Sharps' The Yahoos Trilogy, and more recently in celebration of the legacy of William S. Burroughs during the 100th anniversary of the writer's birth in 1914. Partnering with musician Elliott Sharp, the two have set to work staging poems of famed American Beat poet William S. Burroughs. They recorded their efforts, and have titled the album Rub Out The World (Bandcamp, some NSFW language, natch). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 4, 2016 - 4 comments

Ramsophone

The Ramsophone gives you a new, shiny music box with buttons and dials to play with every time you refresh the page. Made by Robert Vinluan and inspired by the Stranger Things theme.
posted by Harald74 on Sep 3, 2016 - 5 comments

Avalanches rock it on BBC's Essential Mix, and so much more

Last week, BBC 1 broadcast the first Essential Mix from The Avalanches (tracklist, BBC iPlayer / Mixcloud / Global Sets), which they made in support of their new album, Wildflower (YouTube playlist; previously). This is their first broadcasted mix since 2002, according to MixesDB, where you can find 13 more mixes, to expand the band's limited discography. But that's just the tip of the iceberg. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 3, 2016 - 11 comments

Freedom of flight, eagle videos promoting wildlife conservation

Back in March 2015, conservation movement Freedom Conservation has set a new world record by successfully flying ‘Darshan the Eagle’, equipped with a camera, from the top of the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, in Dubai (via Presurfer). Freedom's YouTube channel has more videos, including preparation of the flight, and a music video for Fritz Kalkbrenner's Void, shot on the borders of Lake Geneva with a guest role for Freedom’s Victor the Eagle.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 1, 2016 - 5 comments

"Essentially Ozzfest without the pyrotechnics[...] without the wankers."

In the summer of 2001, Tim Smith threw himself a 40th birthday party. If you know Tim Smith—and you should know Tim Smith (previously)——it won't surprise you that this silly, square little event was attended by some of the most brilliant musicians on the planet. The psychedelic, proto–math rock Monsoon Bassoon—the lead singer/songwriter of whom went on to form Knifeworld—opened the show. Sidi Bou Said, sometimes called the all–woman Pixies, followed. Next up was a shockingly young Stars in Battledress, who you should probably also know, and then William D Drake took the stage, playing rough drafts of songs that in fourteen years' time would form the core of 2015's best musical release. Finally, and this might be the best treat of all, Drake and North Sea Radio Orchestra's Sharron Fortnam took the stage as Lake of Puppies, who never released an album and whose bootlegs are exceedingly difficult to find. (Some of LoP's songs wound up on the Shrubbies album Memphis in Texas, which incidentally is stunning.) The performances are rough and lighthearted, and the recording is mediocre, but this recording is a marvelous treasure trove of musical talents, many of which are still now coming into fruition.
posted by rorgy on Aug 31, 2016 - 12 comments

Large Maps

It may not have set the charts alight when it was first released in 2003, but it’s entirely possible that Maps by New York art-punk outfit Yeah Yeah Yeahs has been the single most influential song of the 21st century so far. How? Let’s look…
posted by chavenet on Aug 31, 2016 - 23 comments

Mojo Magazine’s Best Covers (2004-2016)

32 covers from twelve years of Mojo tribute albums [more inside]
posted by maggieb on Aug 28, 2016 - 6 comments

Pretty Polly Parrot Portuguese

This Brazilian duo of guitar and parrot are pretty good, but birds and guitars are not unusual. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Aug 26, 2016 - 7 comments

I Came From Nothing

Known as much for his flamboyant style as his prolific output, rapper, singer and weirdo Young Thug [prev] has released a new commercial mixtape (can we call commercial mixtapes albums already?). The project title No, My Name Is JEFFERY asserts a new identity, and the music continues to twist the Atlanta trap sound in new and strange directions. "I always had a Michael Jackson mentality…The message is to go back to who I really am. I really am Jeffery. That’s really my swag." Oh, and the cover art is wild.
posted by so fucking future on Aug 26, 2016 - 22 comments

Fart Touch

Fart Touch
posted by DoctorFedora on Aug 26, 2016 - 15 comments

Utah doom

Salt Lake City progressive doom band SubRosa play a three-song set at Hellfest 2014. [Fat of the Ram, 0.04; Ghosts of a Dead Empire, 15.40; The Usher, 27:50.] [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Aug 26, 2016 - 4 comments

Bandcamp Daily

According to the NYT, Bandcamp has "hired a smart staff to create about 20 times the amount of editorial content that had been there previously, writing about music that had just been posted as well as parts of its deep and woolly catalog, in a feature called “Bandcamp Daily.”" [more inside]
posted by rebent on Aug 24, 2016 - 24 comments

Leading Lady

"“A lot of our audiences are kids and teens, and they want to be in on the joke. And they’ll listen again. We’re just a little looser with this stuff than most traditional first ladies.”" -- Michelle Obama, interviewed by Variety.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 23, 2016 - 15 comments

"‘Jette ce jouet’ — ‘throw that toy away’, get a real instrument"

"Toots" Thielemans died in his sleep in Brussels on Monday, August 22, 2016. He was 94. [more inside]
posted by gauche on Aug 23, 2016 - 29 comments

laughing and not being normal.

The story of Grimes [slvimeo]
posted by holmesian on Aug 22, 2016 - 16 comments

The Millennial Whoop

The “Millennial Whoop” is a sequence of notes that alternates between the fifth and third notes of a major scale, typically starting on the fifth. The rhythm is usually straight 8th-notes, but it may start on the downbeat or on the upbeat in different songs. A singer usually belts these notes with an “Oh” phoneme, often in a “Wa-oh-wa-oh” pattern. [more inside]
posted by Just this guy, y'know on Aug 22, 2016 - 73 comments

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