438 posts tagged with Music and rock.
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Interview with Thomas Dolby talking about Foreigner and more!!!

I remember specifically, when I created the intro to “Waiting for a Girl Like You,” I’d done it with a technique that I’d long been hoping to try out, which was basically just to sort of build yourself a Mellotron by recording a sustained note on each track of the multi-track and manipulating them in a wave to create combinations of harmonies. I’d been longing to do that for years, and I actually got to do that one night at Electric Lady and put it on the intro of “Waiting for a Girl Like You.” The band came in in the morning and I played it for them, and there was sort of a silence and then the bass player said, “It’s a bit like massage music, isn’t it?”
posted by josher71 on Jan 6, 2017 - 30 comments

2016 in music: some brightness for dark days

There’s been no shortage of pessimism about 2016—a year that was plagued with fear, hatred, and confusion.... There was plenty to mourn over within music itself, as we said farewell to David Bowiepreviously, Princeprev., Leonard Cohenprev., Phife Dawgprev., Sharon Jonesprev., and too many others. But nevertheless, we found comfort in song: Solange’s meditationsprev., twice, Chance the Rapper’s spirituality, Bruno Mars’s throwback levity. Frank Ocean resurfacedprev., and the Avalanches finally returnedprev.. For the most part, music in 2016 remained good. The 50 Best Albums of 2016 from Spin, or you can go to Album of the Yearprev., twice to see an aggregated list of top albums or browse individual lists, listed alphabetically. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 13, 2016 - 26 comments

RIP Czech rock guitar legend Radim Hladik (1946–2016)

Hladik, who died Sunday from lung disease, would have turned 70 next Tuesday. He was considered his country’s equivalent of a Jeff Beck or Eric Clapton, but performed in relative obscurity behind the Iron Curtain. [more inside]
posted by LeLiLo on Dec 6, 2016 - 5 comments

Is rock the new jazz?

PopMatters thought so in 2012. Now Brooklyn Vegan blames it on The Strokes. [more inside]
posted by grumpybear69 on Dec 2, 2016 - 107 comments

"This is a weird way to earn a living."

Andy Kershaw just spent 45 minutes interviewing The Band's Robbie Robertson. BBC Radio posted the full audio of their chat online as a free downloadable mp3 this morning, and it's fascinating. Among the topics Robertson discusses are a memorable early Hawks gig in Jack Ruby's Texas club, dealing with audience hostility on Dylan's first electric tour, taking the Stones' Brian Jones to a gig by the then-unknown Jimi Hendrix, his memories of the Woodstock festival, 1970s drug madness in the music industry, The Band's legendary farewell at The Last Waltz and why a touring musician's years are like dog years. Both men are clearly enjoying themselves here and Kershaw can be heard cackling like a mad witch at Robertson's best anecdotes.
posted by Paul Slade on Nov 24, 2016 - 14 comments

“The demons are scared of you. They’re running away from you.”

Doom Composer Mick Gordon: A Chat About Dissonance, Making Music Responsive, and How Doom 2016 Ended Up Getting a Metal Soundtrack. [PC Gamer] “Back when Bethesda and id Software were making announcements about the recently rebooted Doom [wiki], one of the hints that it might end up decent was confirmation that Mick Gordon was onboard to compose the soundtrack [YouTube]. His work on Wolfenstein: The New Order and Killer Instinct is cherished among those games’ playerbases, and the intensity of both owe a lot to his anarchic (but still impressively subtle, when it needs to be) approach to getting visuals and music swinging to the same beat. Based in Australia, Gordon’s been around for a while. He’s worked on two Need For Speed games, as well as Shift 2 Unleashed and ShootMania Storm, to name a few examples. Currently he’s working with Arkane Studios on its Prey reboot, which—as he relates below—will mark a departure from his recent, foot-to-the-floor audio rampages.” [Previously.]
posted by Fizz on Nov 19, 2016 - 8 comments

The whole world is wondering: what's wrong with the United States?

"We've come tonight to bring you some joy, some happiness, some inspiration, and some positive vibrations. We want to leave you enough to last you maybe the next six months." Eight years ago this month, soul/pop/gospel music legend Mavis Staples released a live recording titled Live: Hope at the Hideout. Recorded in Chicago's tiny Hideout Lounge, these thirteen songs of protest, hope, and defiance feature Mavis with a stripped down, raw and swampy three-piece band and just a handful of back-up singers. You can stream the entire album here (YT) and all things considered, you really should. [Alt link: stream from her record label's site]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 10, 2016 - 23 comments

Bare bones music

Do you want to watch a skeletal puppet duo perform "Oye Como Va?" I thought so. How about a lone skeleton puppet doing "Let's Twist Again?" But if rock isn't your bag, there's always the Walt Disney classic Silly Symphony: "The Skeleton Dance."
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Oct 19, 2016 - 8 comments

Kickin' your can all over the place

Everyone knows Queen's stomping, clapping epic, "We Will Rock You." In 1977, the band recorded a fast version of the song for the BBC's John Peel. This version sees release November 4th with other rarities on the upcoming Queen on the Air
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 19, 2016 - 39 comments

Ever-blackening kraut clouds choosing not to break

Kandodo McBain's Lost Chants/Last Chance [Spotify] is a collaboration between three members of long-running Bristol psych band The Heads and John McBain of early Monster Magnet. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Oct 13, 2016 - 1 comment

Can’t stop what the Black Plot Design has done

The Black Plot (trigger warning for lyrics), the new song by stoner metal masters High On Fire, boasts a trippy, Heavy Metal-esque animated video by Skinner, the artist behind many Mastodon album covers and their cat-filled video for Asleep In The Deep.
posted by Charlemagne In Sweatpants on Sep 25, 2016 - 9 comments

Drained of meaning

The premise of Jack Hamilton’s deep new study Just Around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination seems like something that’s been on rock history’s tongue for a long time without ever quite leaving it. Chuck Berry, a black man with a guitar, had been a rock and roll archetype in 1960, but by the end of the decade Jimi Hendrix would be seen as rock’s odd man out for being... a black man with a guitar. How did that occur? "Tracing the Rock and Roll Race Problem" an interview in Pitchfork.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 6, 2016 - 27 comments

Utah doom

Salt Lake City progressive doom band SubRosa play a three-song set at Hellfest 2014. [Fat of the Ram, 0.04; Ghosts of a Dead Empire, 15.40; The Usher, 27:50.] [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Aug 26, 2016 - 4 comments

“They’d tell me, 'Music is a hearing thing. It’s not for deaf people'."

Amber Galloway Gallego is an ASL-based music interpreter who has worked with Snoop Dogg, Kendrick Lamar, Destiny's Child, Paul McCartney, and many more rappers, R&B stars, and rock bands. Her YouTube channel is chock full of music interpretation for deaf audiences. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Jun 23, 2016 - 25 comments

No one sings like you anymore

Black Hole Sun covered by Postmodern Jukebox and Haley Reinhart. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jun 20, 2016 - 32 comments

An extraordinary madeleine

A few months ago, I opened an email that changed my life. I vaguely remembered an urban myth about a man who throws his wedding ring into the ocean. Ten years later, he sits down to eat fish at a local restaurant, cuts open the fish and there it is. That’s how I felt when I clicked on an email from someone I didn’t know called Keith Rushton. What he said to me was this: “I’ve got your electric guitar.”
The Guardian's film critic Peter Bradshaw got rid of the guitar he’d loved as a teenager during a clearout and regretted it instantly. He thought he’d never see it again—then an email arrived ...
posted by Sonny Jim on Jun 1, 2016 - 20 comments

The kind of music that makes you say, "Holy Fuck!"

After a six-year absence, Toronto DIY-electro-rockers Holy Fuck return with a new album, Congrats. The video for the lead single, "Tom Tom," directed by Michael Leblanc, was filmed and cast on location in the Romanian village of Zarnesti. Congrats (released yesterday) can be streamed in its entirety on the band's Bandcamp page. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on May 28, 2016 - 4 comments

They feel music left them behind, and Nickelback is all they have left

Nickelback won the 90s culture war
posted by acb on May 20, 2016 - 86 comments

A History of Rock in 15 Minutes

What it says on the tin: 348 rockstars, 84 guitarists, 64 songs, 44 drummers, 1 mashup. [SLVimeo]
posted by MoonOrb on Mar 8, 2016 - 23 comments

Unified, focussed, huge

Let’s not kid ourselves, we ain’t young. We have pretty big ideas garnered from many years of listening to shitty records, splendid records, and albums that are supposed to be influential. Each time we notice our name getting mentioned on certain genre specific internet forums we get the fear. Who in their right minds wants to get stuck playing one sort of thing for seven years and beyond?
London/Somerset/Watford band Hey Colossus, "the most exciting guitar band on the planet" according to Artrocker Magazine, have spent 12 years producing noisy/doom/stoner-influenced/experimental/riff-rock. Near the end of 2015, however, they declared that "it is more subversive for us to compose songs with rigid song structures than it is to absentmindedly clang off another riff-athon." The result, the Radio Static High LP, can now be streamed at The Guardian or via Spotify. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Feb 25, 2016 - 21 comments

Raw Power: From Iggy and the Stooges to AMD and Blu-ray

The Leap: The Improbable Transformation of a Punk Pioneer (mp3) - "James Williamson is a successful tech executive who's been working in Silicon Valley for decades. But it turns out Williamson had a secret, something that no one working with him knew. He was a pioneer in a type of music that is about as far from the tech world as you can get." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 31, 2016 - 24 comments

Chrindie '95

Chrindie '95: A collection of essays about a seminal year in Christian indie rock. [via mefi projects].
1995 was also an incredibly important year for the scene we've come to call “Chrindie,” for Christian indie rock. Much has been written about the weird world of contemporary Christian music, but whatever you think it is ,  you’d be surprised by how many genuinely great Chrindie records were released twenty years ago. During the course of the year, we’ve been writing about brilliant, beautiful, challenging, difficult, weird albums that went mostly unnoticed by mainstream radio and the music press and MTV, in part because they were released on tiny labels with no budgets and marketed primarily to evangelical teenagers in the suburbs.
[more inside] posted by naju on Dec 23, 2015 - 28 comments

One great rock show can change the world

Indie auteur Richard Linklater pleasantly surprised audiences with his charming 2003 comedy School of Rock, in which a struggling musician (High Fidelity co-star and Tenacious D frontman Jack Black) hijacks a 4th grade prep school class and inspires them to become a killer rock band. Buoyed by likeable characters, a great soundtrack, remarkably talented kid musicians, and Black's lengthy, irrepressible, almost improvisational classroom scenes, the film earned rave reviews and inspired scads of copycat programs around the world (as featured in the '05 documentary and reality series Rock School). But while the cast kicked ass at their ten-year reunion concert in 2013, plans for a sequel fell through. Everyone loves an encore, though. And so this weekend saw the Broadway debut of the Andrew Lloyd Webber stage musical starring Alex Brightman, with a TV adaptation to air on Nickelodeon next year. Because there's no way you can stop... the School of Rock. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Dec 7, 2015 - 37 comments

Promises of what I seemed to be

Scott Weiland, Ex-Singer of Stone Temple Pilots, Dies at 48. The troubled singer died in his sleep on a tour stop in Minnesota. Weiland, who had been fired from STP, was in his third act, comparing himself to Keith Richards, and had lost a bandmate earlier in the year. Weiland rose to stardom 23 years ago with STP's debut Core. [more inside]
posted by graymouser on Dec 4, 2015 - 117 comments

That's the way I like It baby, I Don't Wanna Live Forever...

Philthy Animal Taylor, drummer for Motorhead's golden age lineup*, has passed away. RIP, you Philthy bastard. *this clip shows that along with being a great drummer, he could really cut a rug
posted by jonmc on Nov 12, 2015 - 41 comments

I fought the law, and the law won (unless it didn't)

Outlaw songs are at least as old as popular music itself. The image of a gallant loner battling a rigid and unyielding legal establishment has proved irresistible for generations of songwriters. In 1959, Texan Sonny Curtis wrote one of the best, "I Fought The Law." Intended as a vehicle for himself and the post-Buddy Holly Crickets, their single went precisely nowhere.
That is, until it was covered -- the first hit cover was by The Bobby Fuller Four in 1965, then another major version came out 14 years later, from The Clash who revived the "oldie" into what is now a "punk anthem." From there, the covers start piling up.... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 11, 2015 - 29 comments

67 Year-Old Grindcore-Singing Mom Is Way More Brutal Than You

Known only as The Grindmother, she is a 67 year-old Canadian woman who has taken up grindcore music and her demonic wailing will peel the paint off your walls. Why the Grindmother is the greatest thing to happen to grindcore in 2015. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 10, 2015 - 41 comments

Deep down Louisiana close to New Orleans

Chuck Berry was born in 1926. Here he is performing Johnny B Goode: The date is April 14, 2014.
posted by growabrain on Oct 24, 2015 - 21 comments

웃 i am not here and this is not really happening.

After the triumph of OK Computer, Radiohead fell into a creative tailspin -- and frontman Thom Yorke into a nervous breakdown. Exhausted from touring, hounded by press, and jaded by copycats, he escaped into the electronica scene pioneered by Kraftwerk and Warp Records -- fertile ground, the band discovered. Trading spacey rock for apocalyptic brooding, they teased their new sound not with singles or music videos but with innovative web streaming and cryptic, dreamlike "blips" -- winterlands, flocks of cubes, eyeballs, bears. After nearly breaking up over tracklist angst, they cut the kid in half. Thus fifteen years ago today, Kid A and (later) Amnesiac debuted, a confounding mix of electronic fugue, whalesong, pulsing IDM, drunken piano, and epic jazz funeral whose insights into anxiety, political dysfunction, and climate crisis would make it one of the most revered albums of the twenty-first century. See the documentary Reflections on Kid A for interviews and live cuts, or look inside for much more. [more inside]
posted by Rhaomi on Oct 2, 2015 - 63 comments

Rise of the female rock memoir

It’s an all-girl supergroup like no other: Pretenders leader Chrissie Hynde, Jamaican-born singer Grace Jones, Sleater-Kinney guitarist and “Portlandia” star Carrie Brownstein, folkie Jewel, punk poet Patti Smith and 1970s icon Carly Simon. Only these women aren’t reviving Lilith Fair. They’re part of the latest trend in book publishing. In a genre once wholly dominated by male rockers, female musicians are now finding their voices — and their book deals.
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Sep 5, 2015 - 30 comments

“...a sinister flirtation with minimalist funk,”

Deerhunter - Snakeskin [YouTube] Atlanta art-rock band Deerhunter announced its seventh LP, Fading Frontier, Sunday, and premiered the abstract video for its lead single, "Snakeskin." Fading Frontier comes out Oct. 16 on 4AD. via: NPR Music
posted by Fizz on Aug 17, 2015 - 7 comments

Ladies and Gentlemen, This is Tom Jones

Courtesy of Turkish YouTube user Burç Arda Gül, highlights from This is Tom Jones, a variety show that ran on ATV in the UK and ABC in the US from 1969-1971.
Raise Your Hand, with Janis Joplin
Delta Lady, with Joe Cocker
Medley, with Stevie Wonder
Any Place I Hang My Hat Is Home, with Tony Bennett
I Walk the Line, with Johnny and June Carter Cash
Hard to Handle, with some enthusiastic audience members.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Aug 15, 2015 - 30 comments

Star Wars: Wilco Edition

Wilco have released a new album called "Star Wars", featuring 11 new original songs, free for a limited time on their website.
posted by anazgnos on Jul 16, 2015 - 37 comments

The Thunder From Down Under

Starting in the late 70s and throughout the 80s, Australian Rock strode the earth like a tiny, screaming colossus. Whether Hard Rock (drummer convicted of death threats), Pop Rock (lead singer dead from autoerotic aspyxiation), Pub Rock (lead singer's kids no longer forced to play), or what we'd now call Indie (they broke up, get over it) the 80s was the high water mark in Aus/NZ music history.Then the nineties and naughties ushered in an ero of reality-TV driven drivel... [more inside]
posted by Neale on Jul 15, 2015 - 80 comments

My friends all drive Porsches, I must make amends...

The Story Behind Janis Joplin’s ‘Mercedes Benz’
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 8, 2015 - 36 comments

"People in 2015 shouldn't be able to get away with things like this ..."

There was a thought that there weren’t enough bands with guitars that were exciting in the same way as the bands we cared about so we had the thought let’s try and do it better ourselves ... What I wanted that was something post-punk or whatever you want to call it but with songs. There was a while there where I wasn’t hearing any songs.
Formed in 2013, North London band Desperate Journalist take their name from an obscure 1979 beef between The Cure and the NME's Paul Morley. Together, they make jangly, intense indie pop, redolent of faded seaside resorts, cramped book-filled bedsits, and English winter chill. Their debut album, Desperate Journalist [Spotify], appeared earlier this year. [Youtube.] [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Jul 7, 2015 - 21 comments

"Why did I write so much about this shit. Who cares. Enjoy!"

Giant 800-track alt/indie-focused 90's playlist in chronological order "This is a behemoth of a playlist I put together, focusing primarily (but not exclusively) on the alt/indie/college side of the 90's experience. It's 800+ tracks, about 55 hours, and features plenty of songs that tend to get overlooked in the "remember these 90's hits?" pieces that pop up from time to time. Not definitive by any means, and extremely subjective, but it's a decent chunk of curated history in one convenient place. Also it's a fully chronological playlist, on a week-by-week level. So a track released on May 7, 1994 will come before a track released on May 14, 1994. Time and research went into this. Think of it as the Boyhood of 90's playlists!" (From Mefi's own naju, via MetaFilter Projects.)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 28, 2015 - 96 comments

I’m a woman who writes about rock and roll

"The record store, the guitar shop, and now social media: when it comes to popular music, these places become stages for the display of male prowess. Female expertise, when it appears, is repeatedly dismissed as fraudulent. Every woman who has ever ventured an opinion on popular music could give you some variation (or a hundred) on my school corridor run-in, and becoming a recognized 'expert' (a musician, a critic) will not save you from accusations of fakery." The World Needs Female Rock Critics, by Anwen Crawford for the New Yorker. Discussed in the piece is Jessica Hopper's new collection of essays, The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, which has been greeted with glowing praise. Here's an interview she did with Hazlitt: 'Am I Womansplaining To You?' And here she speaks to Meredith Graves of Perfect Pussy: "Being a fangirl is all the qualification you need. And don't wait for anyone to give you permission. They won't. And you should do it anyways." [more inside]
posted by naju on May 26, 2015 - 11 comments

I Know You Can't Control Yourself Any Longer

What Is 'Mom Rock'?
posted by The Whelk on May 8, 2015 - 166 comments

Probably the first time Cromagnon has been mentioned in the NYT

Bernard Stollman, founder of the influential, otherworldly ESP-Disk label, has passed away this week at 85. New York Times obituary. The independent label was home to blazing, provocative recordings from avant-jazz greats like Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman, and Sun Ra, as well as underground rock outsiders like the Godz, the Holy Modal Rounders, and the Fugs. The label's discography is deep, strange, and still largely unexplored by everyone but hardcore music geeks (who tend to be highly passionate about it). From Stereogum: Remembering Bernard Stollman: 10 Essential ESP-Disk Albums.
posted by naju on Apr 24, 2015 - 24 comments

"Nothing is forbidden anymore." —Enrique Iglesias, "Bailamos"

The boys ... are back. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Mar 23, 2015 - 62 comments

And I will think no more

If we're all quite aware of what it has become, then where did it come from? From Jack White’s guitar of course, and from his fingers and his brain. But what about the sequence of notes? Could they have been hanging around in the universe since the cosmic microwave background splurged into existence, just waiting to be aligned by a malleable composer? Speaking to the BBC last year, Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine said: "It's less a riff that feels like someone wrote it than it was unearthed. It's something that's always been there, and it's something that speaks to the reptilian brain of rock listeners."Stupid & Sophisticated: The Rise & Rise Of The Seven Nation Army Riff
posted by timshel on Mar 20, 2015 - 63 comments

Jim O’Rourke Live in Tokyo in June of 2014 [Part 1] [Part 2] Jim O’Rourke Plays “Women of the World” (Live on Christmas Day, 2013). Jim O’Rourke at Work on the Grizzly Man Soundtrack; Special Appearance by Werner Herzog. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 19, 2015 - 7 comments

Music Video with thrash and humorous elements

IRON REAGAN - "Miserable Failure" (SLYT)
posted by josher71 on Feb 4, 2015 - 25 comments

2 bassists, 2 clarinets, 1 cellist, 1 tape-delay technician, 1 pianist

Bing & Ruth is a modern classical ensemble that plays minimalist, piano-driven music. Several videos from Tomorrow Was The Golden Age (RVNG Intl.), their 2014 album, are on Youtube: Warble, TWTGA, Police Police Police Police Police, The Towns We Love Is Our Town (Alternate), and Reflector. Their first album, City Lake, can be streamed on Soundcloud. The Bing & Ruth and Kenitle Floors EPs can be streamed on Bandcamp.
B&R is the project of David Moore, who also leads (parodic?) bluegrass band The Piledrivers and country band Pepper Johnson, and is member of experimental electronic group Emar Diem and blues rockers Langhorne Slim & The Law. In October, Will Stephenson interviewed Moore for BOMB. In 2010, Le Blogotheque released a short film of Moore set to his music.
posted by Going To Maine on Dec 19, 2014 - 8 comments

They still do not sell t-shirts.

27 years after their recording, Fugazi gives their first set of demos an official release. Alternative Press checks in with an appreciation (with SoundCloud streams of the entire release). The Washington Post recounts the band's early years. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 21, 2014 - 37 comments

Outlaw gentlemen with guitars and harmonicas

Volbeat are a "rockabilly metal band" from Copenhagen. Formed in 2001, they list among their influences Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash, along with many metal and punk bands. Some particularly rocking cuts inside, to help you get through Monday afternoon. [more inside]
posted by jbickers on Nov 17, 2014 - 8 comments

Add it up and there outta be more

So wait, there's a band with Jim Jarmusch on keys and a bunch of experimental Horror film directors that released a record in the early 80s of spooky surf-funk and you're NOT listening to it today? Get on it y'all. It's the story of The Del-Byzanteens. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 31, 2014 - 8 comments

" ... and what a stunning voice it is"

We wanted to create something quite muscular and meaty. I was getting a little disenchanted with boring wet music. I wanted something with some kind of punch to it ...
Esben and the Witch formed in 2008 after neophyte guitarist Thomas Fisher bumped into old friend Rachel Davies on the street in Brighton and asked if she'd like to be in a band. Together with multi-instrumentalist Daniel Copeman, they started making a kind of bruised, ghostly electro goth-pop that drew comparisons with dubstep and witch house. Then things changed. Their third album, A New Nature, recorded with Steve Albini after a successful Kickstarter campaign, sees the band step away from their electro-pop origins, combining English-major Davies' lyrical obsessions with Herman Hesse and Jack London with the band's love of uncompromising noise, psych, and transcendent post rock. A New Nature, released last month, can be streamed via Stereogum.
posted by Sonny Jim on Oct 24, 2014 - 11 comments

Don't Let's Stop

Why is the world in love again?
Why are we marching hand in hand?
Why are the ocean levels rising up?
It's a brand new record
for nineteen-ninety,
They Might Be Giants' brand new album:
FLOOD (43m)
Or, if you'd rather meet James Ensor, there's John Henry (57m)! For something Fingertippy, there's Apollo 18 (43m)! More recent: Nanobots (45m) - Join Us (47m) - The Else (38m) (Official links from the band's YouTube channel! Oh, and they also have a podcast.) [more inside]
posted by JHarris on Oct 20, 2014 - 48 comments

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