235 posts tagged with Music by filthy light thief.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 235.

Program music of Kashiwa Daisuke, telling stories without words

"When it comes to modern day composers, the most prominent ones out there are names like Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Toru Takemitsu, Varèse and a couple more.... But when discussing these modern composers, the name ‘Kashiwa Daisuke’ is unlikely to be mentioned. The guy doesn’t even have a Wikipedia page.... But he’s up there along with those ‘big’ names I just mentioned. Program Music I is the very proof of this." Consisting of two long pieces, Stella and Write Once, Run Melos, each evokes the feelings of specific stories, told with modern classical instrumentation, spacious post-rock, jazz piano, and some intentional digital glitches. Almost nine years after that first album, Kashiwa Daisuke has released Program Music II (video for the track "Meteor"), with less glitch and more euphoric elements. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 27, 2016 - 6 comments

A history of one-man bands, from fife and drum to wireless midi

The term "one-man band" generally brings to mind someone surrounded by instruments, like this Croatian street performer, but the earliest examples are a simple combination of pipe and tambor, which traces back to the 1300s. There were records of some creative, enterprising individuals in the centuries since, with more in the early to mid 20th century, including seated set-ups by Fate Norris, Jesse Fuller, and Joe Barrick, with Vic Ellis representing the traveling one-man band. Add in a MIDI controller, and you can expand your sound with less gear. The footprint can shrink more with the new ACPAD, with demos focusing on bringing electronic sounds to an acoustic guitar. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 17, 2016 - 23 comments

Djrum: aiming for the dancefloor, but ending up with more ambient tunes

Felix Manuel, better known as Djrum (pronounced as "drum," evolved from his initial DJ Rum handle) blends hip hop, house, jungle and bass seamlessly in his mixes, plus splices the DNA of techno, dubstep, garage and grime in an attempt to make them, in his words, “live inside each other” in his own productions. This blending is not frenetic, but slow and methodical, often including extended clips from movies, such as heard in The Miracle. With a relatively scant 9 EPs and singles, including two splits, and one album to his name, you can get hear more of the scope of Felix Manuel's musical tastes from his mixes... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 5, 2016 - 6 comments

Party like it's Strasbourg 1518

Medieval Music - 'Hardcore' Party Mix -- "The most rhythmic, upbeat, party medieval music out there, put together in a mix." If you need something to cool down after that 40 minute set, YouTuber VacnaPaul also put together a two hour "daydream mix" of fantasy music, from the video game scores by Jeremy Soule.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 13, 2016 - 19 comments

The positive and uplifting sounds and story of Black Coffee

Nkosinathi Maphumulo is a South African musician better known as Black Coffee. He has been devoted to making music since an early age, and even though he lost the use of his left arm in a car crash while growing up in a poor township, he has gone on to become a superstar in South African music. More than a marathon-session DJ (going so far as to DJ for 60 hours), he created a multimedia stadium show, where he played with a 24 piece orchestra and additional live percussion, keyboards and singers, who all spoke with love for the unique South African experience they created. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 7, 2016 - 5 comments

#TrapCovers: inspired by acoustic covers of Beyonce's 'Formation'

The internet is full of interesting ebbs and flows, and a current push-pull started with Beyoncé's video for 'Formation' (previously), which she also featured in her Super Bowl show. Then came the much-derided acoustic covers. Those covers inspired Nathan Zed to do a trap cover of 'Hey Jude', and the #TrapCovers really took off from there (more on Twitter)
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 28, 2016 - 59 comments

Santigold: embracing the absurdity of current music consumption

Santigold is back with her third album, 99¢ (YT playlist), omnivorous pop in a post-genre age. She's been promoting the album throughout 2015, and enjoying the process this time around, trying to incorporate some of the joy from her son, Radek. She's been bending genres since her self-titled debut album, but this time around she's in a different place from her prior album, Master of My Make-Believe, which was fit for the dystopian end of the Age of Aquarius ... crackling with discontent, with a powerful cover designed by Kehinde Wiley (previously). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 27, 2016 - 8 comments

A mad medley of The Andrew Sisters and The Supremes with Sammy Davis Jr.

A month from today will be 50 years since Sammy Davis Jr. satisfied a whim and had The Andrew Sisters sing the hits of The Supremes, and vise-versa. The quality isn't great, and it's only a snippet of Sammy's short-lived show from 1966. If you want more, here's the full episode, full of singing, dancing and comedy: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5 and part 6.
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 11, 2016 - 11 comments

Synthetic Dance Moods from Turkey, and more psych/prog/advanced music

Are you looking for a world of progressive and psychedelic music? Look no further than Psyche Music aka Prog/Psych/Advanced Music Reviews and Psychefolk aka Psyche Van Het Folk. The sites are old, so beware of dead links, but there's also more online now than there was when Progressive.Homestead.com was first linked on the blue, over a decade ago. Now hear Metin Alatli's "Alamooga Esinlenmeler" for 34 minutes of "early 70s Moog-madness" from Turkey.
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 5, 2016 - 4 comments

Maribou State: "We don’t set out to make celestial, sublime music"

The duo of Maribou State have come a long way from impressing Fatboy Slim with their remix of Praise You that landed them on his label. Last year, they dropped their debut album, Portraits (YT playlist, Bandcamp), "occupying a space somewhere between ambient electronic and a more house-nodding, four on the floor sensibility," and they had the honor of getting the first Essential Mix for 2016 (Mixcloud; Soundcloud). “We don’t set out to make celestial, sublime music. We aim for something more uptempo and less atmospheric. But that’s the way it comes out.[more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 9, 2016 - 4 comments

The Seasons, by Tchaikovsky in 1876 and Ben Wendel and friends in 2015

The idea and goal of “The Seasons” was a simple one: 12 original pieces dedicated to 12 musicians I deeply admire, released over 12 months. Though this ended up being one of the most challenging and complex projects I’ve ever attempted, it also turned out to be one of the most rewarding.
Ben Wendel, inspired by Tchaikovsky's work from 139 years ago, has finished his year of duets: The Seasons Project (YouTube playlist)
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 29, 2015 - 1 comment

Night Of Visions, the ominous sounds of a life altering experience

Since he started Akkord (s/t album playlist) with Synkro, Liam Blackburn has been in search of a sound. His last few solo releases skirted past drum & bass through to techno, ambient, IDM and, with 2013's excellent Storm, some sort of ultra-hi-tech jungle.... [H]e's re-emerging as Ancestral Voices on the increasingly out-there label Samurai Horo....
The debut album for Blackburn's new alias is "yawning chords, complex drum patterns and existential dread," directly inspired by his mind-expanding, life-altering experiences on Machu Picchu and in the Amazon, and you can hear all of Night Of Visions on Bandcamp.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 24, 2015 - 8 comments

Stromae's Racine Carrée, live - we were amazing

In support of his most recent album, Racine Carrée (YT playlist with official videos), Stromae played 209 concerts in 25 countries. From these, he captured performances at the Bell Center in Montreal on September 28 and 29 to present two hours of the singing, dancing, acting spectacle that was his show (YT). Bonus: it's subtitled in English, if you want to understand those French lyrics. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 17, 2015 - 13 comments

Myth and reality of the Hardanger fiddle and Myllarguten

Norwegian legends and fairy tales are full of references to subterranean or supernatural beings, many of which have the fiddle as a symbolic attribute.... Even today, some people believe that anyone hoping to become a real fiddler must be apprenticed to Fossegrimen.... The Hardanger fiddle is inextricably linked to such legends, and it is the folk tunes which have kept them alive.
And Targjei Augundsson is at the crossroads of legends and folk tunes, whose skill with the fiddle is said to have come at the price of his soul from a deal with Fossegrimen, making him something of the Norwegian predecessor to Robert Johnson. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 16, 2015 - 16 comments

An unexpected bird, heard over and over in music since 1989: the loon

Listen to the "Loon Garden" sample from one of the E-mu Emulator II's stock library of sounds, and it may sound familiar in an unusual way. Instead of invoking a feeling of being near the Great Lakes, you might get taken to dance floors or mixes of the past and present, from 808 State's "Pacific State" and Sueño Latino's "Sueño Latino (Paradise Mix)" (both vaguely tropical numbers from 1989), to the more recent Rustie's "Up Down (feat. D Double E)" and Nicki Minaj's "Anaconda" (NSFW). Philip Sherburne tracked down the story of a sample that keeps coming back, collecting more examples and getting some great insight into a number of notable tracks.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 13, 2015 - 41 comments

The Secret History of the Mongols, updated in musical form and annotated

The Secret History of the Mongols is the oldest surviving Mongolian-language literary work, and is regarded as the single most significant native Mongolian account of Genghis Khan. Linguistically, it provides the richest source of pre-classical Mongolian and Middle Mongolian, and while you can read it in various translations, it can be quite a slog. That's why Mongolian rappers Gee of/with Click Click Boom team up with Jonon to present a musical version of Mongolian History, in Mongolian. Luckily, there are English subtitles to this video, but there's still a gap between knowing the words and knowing what they mean. With that, you can find a collections of links as annotations below. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 23, 2015 - 11 comments

It's kind of a love song--all the monsters enjoying each other's company

You've tuned back into Radio FLTR, where we're digging up more hits from the past and doin' a monster song with ya on this beautiful November night. Here's that young dreamboat with the wacky expressions, Bobby Pickett doing the Monster Mash back in 1964 on American Bandstand, two years after his hit was first released, when he first cashed in on two hits at once - songs about dancing and monster mania. Bobby "Boris" Pickett didn't rest on those laurels in '62, but swiftly came back with a whole album of monster songs that same year .... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 20, 2015 - 13 comments

The (slow in coming, but very real) return of Mo' Wax

Mo'Wax is a British record label that was formed in 1992 by teenage school friends James Lavelle and Tim Goldsworthy. The label quickly gained renown for trip-hop, turntablism and other odd beat hip-hop, from the likes of Japanese DJ Krush, Americans Money Mark, Dr. Octagon and DJ Shadow, British Luke Vibert, and their own UNKLE project. The label lasted a solid decade, then petered out as the 2000s wore on. James Lavelle looked back on 21 years of the label (a year late), and is now restarting the label. This effort is being kicked off with releases by a West London artist, Elliot Power. More waxing below the break. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 14, 2015 - 20 comments

I fought the law, and the law won (unless it didn't)

Outlaw songs are at least as old as popular music itself. The image of a gallant loner battling a rigid and unyielding legal establishment has proved irresistible for generations of songwriters. In 1959, Texan Sonny Curtis wrote one of the best, "I Fought The Law." Intended as a vehicle for himself and the post-Buddy Holly Crickets, their single went precisely nowhere.
That is, until it was covered -- the first hit cover was by The Bobby Fuller Four in 1965, then another major version came out 14 years later, from The Clash who revived the "oldie" into what is now a "punk anthem." From there, the covers start piling up.... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 11, 2015 - 29 comments

Elènne: spreading the dance music and #ffcf05

Elènne (ɛ'lɛn) makes a wide range of dance music, from lush vocal pop (Between Us feat. Mothica), something with chopped beats and vocals (King of Thebes), and a bit of marching band percussion with strings and ... I don't know what (Burning Bridges). Many of the tracks are free to download via Soundcloud or Dropbox, plus Elènne has a Bandcamp account. For more music, here is Elènne's Yellow Mix #1, a pick of current favorites and inspirations. For even more musical selections, Elènne picks a track per week on Facebook.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 1, 2015 - 3 comments

Who you gonna call? The story behind the Ghostbusters music video

How did a funky R&B guitarist and singer get signed on to a spook-tacular music video? No, I'm not talking about Ray Parker Jr.'s very Halloween-appropriate music video for "The Other Woman", but his later video for the scary-funny movie, Ghostbusters. Screen Crush has the inside story on the making of Ghostbusters theme song video (alt source: Daily Motion). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 31, 2015 - 13 comments

How do a bunch of wonky generated tones translate to memorable sounds?

A Beginner's Guide to the Synth is a nice long write-up to the history of the synthesizers, from their origins up to the present, with embedded sound samples. For a deeper dive into the history of the hardware, learn the secrets of the synths from Sound on Sound.
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 25, 2015 - 13 comments

Nostalgic beats from Ayman Rostom, aka Dr. Zygote and The Maghreban

Ayman Rostom had a penchant for nostalgic productions in his music, which isn't surprising given how he studied his brother's tapes of Yo! MTV Raps back in the day, which lead to his career as Dr. Zygote and his own Boot Records label (Bandcamp). More recently, he's taken the handle The Maghreban and embraced stripped-down house-type beats that he releases on his Zoot Records label, though in his new video for Now Easy, the focus is on his love of oldschool drum'n'bass. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 19, 2015 - 4 comments

A Brief Look at 12 of Microgenres, from associated artists

The Fader recently collected insights from artists associated with 12 microgenres of the past 15 years, from electroclash to vaporwave, but they left out sound samples. That's remedied, below the break. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 10, 2015 - 34 comments

Looking back on Anabolic Frolic, Happy 2b Hardcore in Canada

The story of Anabolic Frolic, the DJ name for Chris Samojlenko, tracks closely to the history of Happy Hardcore in Canada, if not North America at large, from the very first Happy 2b Hardcore mix released in the beginning of 1997, to the final Hullabaloo to mark the anniversary of the first Hullabaloo rave. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 3, 2015 - 22 comments

Remembering the Palomino, the legendary North Hollywood honky-tonk

On February 19, 1987, it was just another night at the Palomino, with Taj Mahal and The Graffiti Band playing some folk, soul, blues and maybe a bit of jazz. It wasn't unusual for some more major musicians to be in the crowd, but this night George Harrison, Bob Dylan, John Fogerty, and Jesse Ed Davis joined Taj and jammed, with Fogerty playing "Proud Mary" at the prompting of Dylan. But if you want to visit this iconic club today, you'll find yourself in front of Le Monge banquet hall. The Palomino is no more, but you can visit the Valley's legendary honky-tonk with an oral history of The Palomino, and a fan-made VH1 "Behind the Music" style documentary that includes some vintage clips and photos. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 30, 2015 - 9 comments

Meow the Jewels - It's real, and for a good cause

El-P has recruited an all-star cast of producers* to help him deliver the album in its full feline glory. But first, we needed cats... Run the Jewels don't take themselves too seriously, because Meow the Jewels (playlist, NSFW lyrics) is really happening. You can download the remix album for free, or buy it in various formats, with all proceeds of the album will go to charities that benefit victims of police violence. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 28, 2015 - 23 comments

Squeezebox Stories: tales of the accordion, the instrument that you hug

California has long been home to immigrants from around the world (and from within the U.S.). What is less known, however, is that such longstanding histories of immigration and internal domestic migration have made California a fertile ground for extremely diverse and vibrant accordion musical cultures. With that, here is background on four immigrant populations —Italians, Creoles, Lebanese/Middle Eastern, and Mixtec/Mexican — to give more background the Squeezebox Stories, about an hour of history and tales of the accordion, filtered through customs and cultures found in California. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 12, 2015 - 25 comments

Prince gets "experimental" with Joshua Welton, releases album on Tidal

Time indeed does not exist on Prince albums. Perhaps that’s why he’s kept releasing one or two every few years even long after his hit-making days ended. At age 24, on “1999,” he established a dichotomy—“I don't wanna die / I’d rather dance”—and at age 57, he seems to be taking that idea of dance-or-die more literally than ever. Who cares if fewer and fewer people are listening? Who cares if releasing exclusively to Tidal will limit his audience further? What matters is that Prince is working, and that the holy devoted will follow him.
Spencer Kornhaber reviews HITNRUN Phase One on The Atlantic, warning that both Prince and "the gnarly funk-rock and R&B that made Prince famous" are in short supply on the album, which is produced by Joshua Welton, who said the album is "an experimental Prince record for fans who just don’t care about him sounding like a certain thing." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 9, 2015 - 21 comments

new/ old/ hazy/ lo-fi boom-bap beats from Saikei Collective

If you enjoy laid back/ hazy/ chilled/ lo-fi hip-hop type beats, you may well enjoy the sounds of the Saikei Collective, which is based in the Philippines but includes a fluid roster of like-minded cats* from around the world, making original beats and remixing some tracks you may recognize. Since April 2015, the collective has posted nine releases on Bandcamp, consisting of five compilations, one collection of "two-player" collaborations, and three solo releases. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 2, 2015 - 8 comments

Damian Lazarus, The Ancient Moons and Crosstown Rebels

Damian Lazarus is an interesting chap. On one hand, you have the self-proclaimed ancient wizard who channels mysticism into his live rave mixes around the world, while on the other hand there is his well-regarded house music label, Crosstown Rebels, which recently celebrated its tenth birthday with a 3 CD/40 track compilation. You can find a ton from both sides of Damian online. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 25, 2015 - 4 comments

BadBadNotGood: the kids are alright (and jazz isn't dead)

Back in December 2011, three kids (none over 21) who were studying jazz bonded over their love of hip-hop, performed a live cover of Gucci Mane's "Lemonade". It was noisy and jammy, but jazzy, and the crowd loved it. The trio followed up with a live video titled The Odd Future Sessions Part 1, which got love and support from Tyler, The Creator. BadBadNotGood (BBNG) took off from there, and are still going .... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 8, 2015 - 8 comments

Funky Israeli (sampled) hip-hop from Socalled, Alchemist, and friends

Not since (Socalled's) The Socalled Seder has Hebrew and hip-hop been so thrillingly merged. In his signature funky collage style, Alchemist layers drum brakes, with various warped and looped vintage Israeli records. On “Shalom Alechem,” a pitched up vocal recording of the Sabbath song refrains over a hard, 90s style boom-bap beat, spiced up with intermittent “check it out”s from the voice of an unidentified hype-man. It's awesome.
From Shalom Life's review of The Alchemist's new instrumental album, Israeli Salad. The review also notes that this is similar to Alchemist’s 2012 album Russian Roulette, which uses 1970's Soviet music as its main source material.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 16, 2015 - 10 comments

Weird weekend music: Björk x TRI▼ANGLE Records; Nicolas Jaar variations

Björk has been getting involved with TRI▼ANGLE Records a good bit, after The Haxan Cloak, a notable inclusion on the Tri Angle roster, was involved making Vulnicura, as well as producing a new remix. Back in February, Björk represented Tri Angle on Rinse FM with Holy Other and Celestial Trax, and then in May, she dropped in on Tri Angle's 5th Anniversary/Birthday Party to mix for an hour, and uploaded that set to Soundcloud (if you prefer YouTube, someone uploaded the set in four parts: 1, 2, 3, 4 - set to repeating video recorded from the show). If you'd like some more weirdness for your weekend, Nicolas Jaar recently shared a new, non-syncing version of Pomegranates (previously) as a free download linked through Facebook and Twitter, reposted by Factmag, where you can read some of the extensive liner notes before downloading the file.
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 26, 2015 - 8 comments

DJ-KiCKS:20 years, 50 mixes to make you move in the comfort of your home

The DJ-Kicks series was born in Berlin in 1995, and lays claim to the title of the first officially licensed DJ mix series available commercially. In the 20 years since it started, the series has covered house and techno, drum'n'bass and downtempo, and genres without convenient names, put together by musical monuments like Carl Craig, Thievery Corporation, and Four Tet to relative newcomers like Gold Panda and Maya Jane Coles. Besides the expected DJs and producers, the series also includes Daddy G (of Massive Attack) in a rare solo effort, pulling out unreleased dubplates for his mix, and Erlend Øye (of Kings of Convenience and The Whitest Boy Alive) providing his own a capella additions to the mix. For the 50th release, the series comes back to Germany with DJ Koze, bringing you his version of a "modern party mix." That's a lot of words about music, so let's hear it already! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 21, 2015 - 41 comments

Leon Bridges: like that 60's rhythm and blues sound never left

Taking on the dreamy, compelling sound of the lost soul decades is a damn high bar to set for yourself. Soul revivalists usually don’t get very far in my book, because what’s the point of competing with the likes of Sam Cooke and Otis Redding? Listening to Leon Bridges made me do a 180 on that stance. See, if you actually can hold a candle to legends like Cooke and Redding — and Bridges can — then there’s no reason not to indulge in some nostalgia.
NPR has a first listen of Coming Home, Bridges' debut album, and you can see and hear plenty more of him on YouTube, from a live cover of Cooke's "Nothing Can Change This Love" to a solo performance of "Lisa Sawyer," a reflective song about his mother. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 17, 2015 - 6 comments

Jamie xx, set to visions of a gradually greener Mars

"Gosh" - music by Jamie xx, something of an homage to early 1990s UK club culture, with visuals of a slowly terraformed Mars by Erik Wernquist, who was seen on MetaFilter before for "Wanderers," a similarly gorgeous, realistic film of space exploration.
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 6, 2015 - 22 comments

Put it on ice bitch, Dr Pepper/Feeling so clean, it don't get no fresher

Most people are aware of the (troublesome) official and unofficial drink sponsorship for alcoholic drinks in pop music of all sorts (see also: St. Ides ads by early 1990s rappers), but there are also (un)official cross marketing efforts in sodas. Coca-Cola is probably the most prominent on and prolific on the official side, who have even sponsored a series of "Coke DJ-Culture" singles and mixes a decade back from some significantly large names in electronic/dance and hip-hop circles. Now add to the mix "Doctor Pepper," a song by Diplo with South Korean superstar CL, Mad Decent’s own RiFF RAFF and Atlanta’s OG Maco. It was a quick song thrown together by CL and built from there, not (yet) the official summer anthem for Dr. Pepper.
posted by filthy light thief on May 30, 2015 - 22 comments

Lucero Tena, maestro of castanets

Lucero Tena (Spanish) has amazing rhythm and control, as seen and heard in her dancing, tapping, clapping and snapping, but she is best known for her mastery of the castanets, used in accompaniment to a solo guitar along with her dancing, and perhaps more impressively, as a solo instrument in front of an orchestra there in a piece specifically written for her and her castanets. She may not dance any more, but her skill with the castanets is still astonishing. If you're lucky, you can catch her in a live performance.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 28, 2015 - 13 comments

Why Zev Love X became MF Doom and put on that metal mask

In 1991, Daniel Dumile was part of KMD, a trio with his brother and another kid from their neighborhood, when they released their first album on Elektra, Mr. Hood (YT playlist). Dumile's next album wouldn't come out until 1999, and on an independent label. Operation: Doomsday was not released under the name he used with KMD, Zev Love X, but M(etal) F(ace) Doom, and he only appeared while wearing his metal mask. The transition from an upbeat youth to a cartoon villain was not clear at the time, unless you got your hands on the unreleased (except as a bootleg) second album of KMD, Black Bastards (full album on YT). Here is the story of that transition: KMD's Black Bastards and the Birth of MF Doom, a chapter from Brian Coleman's Check the Technique Volume 2, "more liner notes for hip-hop junkies." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 20, 2015 - 13 comments

Nils Frahm declares March 29th Piano Day with a free album

At the end of 2014 I had an immediate urge to release a solo piano album which I recorded some time ago, and I was looking for a specific occasion to do so. I wanted it to be a nice surprise for everyone, so I thought of a meaningful release date to begin with.

Seconds later it came to my mind: I was about to create my own holiday in order to come up with a reason for this release. Moreover, if I could be proud of something, then of being responsible for an annual celebration of the piano. And here comes the best bit, Piano Day will happen on the 88th day of the year, which most of the time is the 29th of March. Piano Day is intended to be the most joyful of all holidays.
Join with Nils Frahm in celebrating Piano Day by enjoying his album Solo for free (sample: "Wall"), or enjoy other celebrations of the piano in his Piano Day 2015 playlist.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 29, 2015 - 18 comments

Celebrating 50 magic tapes with The Magician

The Magician was initially a mysterious mixer who released Magic Tapes, mixes of disco, house and pop without tracklists, challenging listeners to compile tracklists themselves, and they did. But he stepped out from behind the curtain, remixing Lykke Li's "I Follow Rivers" and later his debut single, "I Don't Know What To Do" feat. Jeppe. In 2013, he signed with Parlophone, but has continued making his Magic Tapes. Last month, he celebrated his 50th mix with Mixmag TV and Arches. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 24, 2015 - 3 comments

Aphex Waits: Tom vs Computer Control mashed up by Esmko

Eskmo took a few Tom Waits songs that he love and mashed them with Computer Controlled Acoustic Instruments pt2 by Aphex Twin, and created Aphex Waits (Soundcloud with free DL; YouTube). If you'd like more weird electronic music from Eskmo, Dazed has a preview stream of his new album along with an interview about it. Then there's Eskmo's self-titled album on Grooveshark, which he released on Ninja Tune back in 2010, which lead to videos for Cloudlight [previously], We Got More [previously], and Color Dropping. He has also shared more music on Soundcloud.
posted by filthy light thief on Mar 1, 2015 - 6 comments

Lorn's The Maze to Nowhere EPs, experimental, accessible and free

Lorn has never been one to shy away from the darkness in his music. However, where as his previous release, Ask the Dust (Grooveshark) was bleak and mechanical in it's struggle with its demons, The Maze to Nowhere (Bandcamp) is melodic, fuzzy and at times even warm. If you've listened to Lorn's previous releases, 'warm' is generally not a word associated with his tunes. Whereas his previous effort worked with the bleakness of empty space, we find him filling in those cracks on this album with static, fuzz and ambient effects. The resulting product is a much more organic sounding beast, and man, does it sound great.
From the Sputnik Music review of Lorn's first of ? parts in The Maze to Nowhere series of pay-what-you-want EPs on Bandcamp, which now includes Part 2 and Part 3, still with no end in sight. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 28, 2015 - 5 comments

Don't call it a comeback, I've been here for years

Flula with his Mama & Papa (on the accordion) - "Mama Said Knock You Out", and Flula with Sir Mix-A-Lot - "Baby Got Back (remix)", more autotunes (playlist).
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 21, 2015 - 11 comments

Proof that The Beatles traveled through time, from 1964 to 1994

Over 50 years ago, The Beatles arrived in New York for their first US visit, but what if ....
Having departed Heathrow on the 7th February 1964, John Lennon, in a playful mood, ordered the pilot to divert the plane via the Bermuda Triangle. Newly declassified documents reveal that Pan Am Flight 101 disappeared from US radar screens shortly after midday, local time. At great expense we have obtained – from reliable Russian mafia sources – an MP3 copy of the black box recorder of that ill-fated Boeing 707. This indicates that as far as those aboard the plane knew, after experiencing severe cyclonic turbulence over the Atlantic Ocean, they re-routed towards New York, believing themselves to have narrowly avoided aeronautical disaster. But on arriving at JFK airport, they were stunned to learn that they had arrived in the year 1994.
That's the premise of An Adventure To Pepperland Through Rhyme & Space, a two-hour ill-trippy musical adventure with golden era hip-hop musicians, from P.E. to Spoonie Gee, Tha Liks to Hieroglyphics and Large Professor to Salt n Pepa, courtesy of Tom Caruna, also the artist behind Enter the Magical Mystery Chamber (previously, and still online)
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 9, 2015 - 14 comments

The Bombay Royale, music for daring Bollywood-style adventures

Snakes! Bullets! Super secret agents! Bandits! Monkeys and tigers! Espionage and romance! Are you excited yet? Are you on the edge of your seat? Does this sound like a movie to you? Ah, these are the recurring themes in some of classic Bollywood’s greatest cinematic extravaganzas, where acting and plot took a backseat to some of the craziest, over-the-top song and dance scenes ever committed to celluloid. Enter The Bombay Royale, a local 11-piece musical powerhouse who have taken the themes and soundtracks from these films and have infused them with all the colour, production and energy one would expect from a four-plus hour Bollywood movie. The Bombay Royale had first set down to do strictly covers from the gilded ‘60s era of Bollywood, but soon evolved into writing their own material.
Sit down with Parvyn Kaur Singh AKA "The Mysterious Lady," one of the singers of the band, for an introduction to the cast of characters behind the albums You Me Bullets Love (Soundcloud; track-by-track description with musical director and saxophonist Andy Williamson, AKA "The Skipper") and The Island of Dr. Electrico (Soundcloud; a review of the Bollywood inspired surf / disco / funk album). [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 18, 2015 - 12 comments

The music of Kiasmos curls itself around you, snug as a glove

If a band opened their set saying they were going to wake people up with techno music, you would probably not expect the musicians to be a BAFTA-award winning modern classical composer and a member from an electronic pop/dance group, but that's how Kiasmos introduced their music during Iceland Airwaves/KEXPort in Reykjavík. If you like what you hear there, here are a few more tracks on Grooveshark, and read on for more on the members of Kiasmos, Ólafur Arnalds and Janus Rasmussen. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 16, 2015 - 8 comments

Madonna on hacks, music leaks, and attempts to regain control

Madonna has had an interesting relationship with leaks, specifically in how she has responded to them. In 2003, when she was gearing up for American Life (YT), she also spread mostly silent MP3s with the short message "What the f**k do you think you're doing? to dissuade would-be downloaders. The message got spun into "remixes" and some got pressed to CD. Jump ahead to 2012, and Madonna's album MDNA (YT) leaked a week ahead of its release date, which seems pretty minor, compared to what happened this past December. 13 tracks and artwork identifying the album with a title of Iconic or Unapologetic B*tch were leaked, ahead of any formal album announcement. But that wasn't the end of it. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 9, 2015 - 73 comments

Shake off that winter chill with some URSULA 1000!

Rid yourself of those winter blues with Ursula 1000's Winter (Mega)Mixes, which are not focused on winter music, but rather an upbeat mix of deep, funky, sleazy, acid tinged delights, as Alex Gimeno, the Brooklyn-based retro-futuristic producer/DJ/multi-instrumentalist labeled his latest mix. Read on for more sampladelic easy listening breakbeat tracks in a style similar to continental popsters from Pizzicato Five to Dimitri from Paris, plus some fuzzy garage rock-influenced tunes! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 31, 2014 - 15 comments

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