8798 posts tagged with Music.
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Back to the future mixes / Radio DT64 / Paul Kalkbrenner

Musician Paul Kalkbrenner, perhaps best known for the (hard-to-get in region 1 but fantastic) movie Berlin Calling (trailer, Sky and Sand video, Revolte scene) grew up in East Berlin listening to electronic music on East-German Youth Radio DT64 (German wiki info, soundcloud archives). While reconnecting with memories of this time he has spent 18 months compiling a free 3-part mix series with 2 released so far, constructed from online recordings of DT64 broadcasts from the late 80s and early 90s, mostly from the years immediately after the wall fell until the station closed in 1993. [more inside]
posted by advil on Aug 2, 2016 - 7 comments

Nate Wooley's guide to American Weirdos

[Nate Wooley, T]he New York trumpeter and composer celebrates the USA’s lesser known maverick composers. "So here I attempt to give positive form and definition to this term while presenting some music that exemplifies the work of those American weirdos that have inspired me in the past 15 years. I define the artists below as having committed themselves to working outside of an established musical dialectic. Instead, they hurl themselves into the void of an idea with only their personal context and history as aesthetic anchor points. The starting point of their work is self-contained. Tradition, history, theory be damned. "
posted by OmieWise on Aug 2, 2016 - 11 comments

Telefone, the vision and voice of Noname that is singularly her own

A few months back, Chance the Rapper released Coloring Book mixtape (Soundcloud), "one of the strongest rap albums released this year, an uplifting mix of spiritual and grounded that even an atheist can catch the Spirit to." (Pitchfork) That mixtape features a ton of guests, including Kanye West, Lil Wayne, Future, Justin Bieber ... and Noname. Who? She's a Chicago rapper, formerly known as Noname Gypsy, and with her own mixtape, Telefone (Soundcloud), she "has only further solidified her reputation as a deft and hyper-intelligent young rapper, at first a one woman Digable Planets for the melodic Chicago contemporary, but quickly something wholly unique." (Noisey/Vice)
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 2, 2016 - 11 comments

Singing in the Masjid-e Shah in Isfahan

An Iranian student visiting Isfahan's Masjid-e Shah, or Shah Mosque, also known as the Imam Mosque, takes advantage of the mosque's excellent acoustics to sing a brief and lovely song. [more inside]
posted by yasaman on Aug 1, 2016 - 12 comments

Listen over cocktails in your garden

As the sun begins its downward descent on summer, we pause to take a deep breath of humid air with Pablo Grossi, Argentinian grandmaster-level vinyl digger and selector. 50 miles out from Buenos Aires, Pablo has discovered and traded in thousands of records around the region so that "people from here can know them and have them". Comprised mostly of his vinyl recordings, this exemplary showcase of Exotica is warm to the touch. Best served with ice and lime garnish.
posted by rebent on Aug 1, 2016 - 8 comments

Daddy can you multiply triples?

A group of Science YouTubers got together to perform a tribute to a scientist Hamilton, in the style of his political musical namesake.
posted by divabat on Aug 1, 2016 - 14 comments

Twinkle, Twinkle, Vogel Staar: On Mozart's Feathered Collaborator

If you whistle a tune often enough to a starling, the bird will not only sing it back to you, it will improvise its response and create something new. On May 27, 1784, Mozart whistled a 17 note phrase to a starling in a Viennese shop and to his delight it spat the tune right back — but not without taking some liberties first. So he bought it and brought it home. That bird lived with him for the three most productive years of his life, during which he completed more than 60 compositions, including Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. The piano concerto as we still understand it was built in those rooms. The “Jupiter” Symphony began and Figaro ended. Melodies that two centuries of humans have since whistled could have first been volleyed between a genius and his pet bird.
posted by zarq on Jul 29, 2016 - 21 comments

Einojuhani Rautavaara (1928-2016)

The Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara died on Wednesday at the age of 87. He wrote eight symphonies, nine operas, 12 instrumental concertos, plus a wide variety of orchestral, chamber, instrumental, choral and vocal works. [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Jul 29, 2016 - 7 comments

Sharp's Appalachian Harvest

On July 28, 1916, Cecil Sharp and Maude Karpeles collected their first folk songs from residents of the southern Appalachians, along the border between Tennessee and North Carolina. These songs, along with songs collected by Olive Dame Campbell (who had given Sharp the idea the previous year), were published in 1917 in English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians, now one of the major reference works of American folk music. [more inside]
posted by hades on Jul 28, 2016 - 4 comments

*takes it to the streets*

In the midst of today's choas and confusion, I bring you an uniting cultural landmark - What's Happening Season Two Episode 16 featuring the Doobie Brothers. For the uninitianted- What's Happening, a TV show inspired by Cooley High. And the Doobie Brothers a band from California, that staretd out playing biker country rock who via personell changes morphed into a blue eyed soul outfit, whose lead vocalist had a solo hit that provided the basis for a hip-hop classic. In any event, the episode is a great late 70's period piece.
posted by jonmc on Jul 28, 2016 - 21 comments

16 bit air horns

Can the origin of grime actually be found in a SNES game?
posted by selfnoise on Jul 27, 2016 - 16 comments

Inside the Playlist Factory

As streaming has gone mainstream, these curators, many of whom began their professional lives as bloggers and DJs, have amassed unusual influence. Their work, as a rule, is uncredited — the better for services designed to feel like magic — but their reach is increasingly unavoidable. Spotify says 50% of its more than 100 million users globally are listening to its human-curated playlists (not counting those in the popular, algorithmically personalized “Discover Weekly”), which cumulatively generate more than a billion plays per week. According to an industry estimate, 1 out of every 5 plays across all streaming services today happens inside of a playlist. And that number, fueled by prolific experts, is growing steadily. [slBuzzfeed]
posted by ellieBOA on Jul 26, 2016 - 43 comments

The Ghostess with the Mostest

Marni Nixon, the Singing Voice Behind the Screen, Dies at 86. [more inside]
posted by Hermione Granger on Jul 25, 2016 - 36 comments

Everything you see is sound. Everything you hear is photography.

An interview with Jeff Louviere and Vanessa Brown, otherwise known as Louviere + Vanessa who created the album Resonantia which includes unique visualizations made by photographing water vibrating at the frequencies of musical notes. There is a twelve frame animation that can be viewed by placing the included praxinoscope mirror on the album to reflect images etched in the vinyl. [more inside]
posted by Clinging to the Wreckage on Jul 25, 2016 - 3 comments

Noise Patterns

"Tristan Perich’s Noise Patterns comes in a clear jewel case, but it isn’t a CD. It’s a small, matte-black circuit board. Powered by a watch battery, it produces a series of musical compositions built from the on/off operations on the minuscule chip at the center of the device, the same sort of chip you might find in a microwave oven." It's a 1-bit noise-techno album, painstakingly constructed from assembly language instructions that work directly with the binary data of the processor itself. Oh, and every single byte is used. Marc Weidenbaum sits down for a lengthy, detailed interview with Tristan to discuss what Noise Patterns is, and how it was made. (You can order through Physical Editions or Bleep, where there are a few clips to listen to.)
posted by naju on Jul 25, 2016 - 26 comments

More than just a jumbuck in a tucker sack

Waltzing Matilda is the bush ballad that introduced elements of Australian slang to generations of Americans. Instantly recognizable but less familiar is Waltjim Bat Matilda a version by Darwin-based Indigenous singer Ali Mills. She’s singing in Kriol, which is spoken by more people than any other language exclusive to Australia and is based on the highly endangered Gurindji. Waltjim Bad Matilda is also the name of Mills’ first solo album after performing many years with the Mills Sisters.
posted by layceepee on Jul 24, 2016 - 9 comments

In Celebration Of The 80s 12" Remix

Not a modern remix of an 80s song. Remixes from the early days of extended mixes, back in the 80s. Like Phil Collins - Take Me Home (Extended 12" Mix). When remixes were made up of elements from the original song, not a DJ remix. Like Yes - Owner Of A Lonely Heart (12" Extended Version). Back when remixes were a bit clunky but imaginative, like Madonna - Lucky Star (US Remix). [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Jul 22, 2016 - 175 comments

Kate Bush Gifs

A Kate Bush Gif a day keeps the sanity away!
posted by josher71 on Jul 22, 2016 - 28 comments

Do we talk about golf or birds?

I'm Afraid to Talk to Men (slyt music video)
posted by stoneweaver on Jul 21, 2016 - 17 comments

Remember it's your life. Live it any way you like.

First Lady Michelle Obama joins James Corden for a drive around the White House grounds. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 21, 2016 - 56 comments

Ready, Unsteady

In June of 1979, a song called "Ready 'N Steady" appeared on Billboard's "Bubbling Under" chart and persisted there for three weeks, struggling up to number 102 before vanishing into a legendary obscurity. For the next 37 years, music historians were unable to find any other evidence of the song's existence—no recordings, no memories of airplay, no band or label information. This month, the mystery of the "phantom record" was finally solved: "Ready 'N Steady" exists, and you can listen to it here. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jul 20, 2016 - 49 comments

Presidential Campaigns Are Like Wildfires/State of the Union Songbook

Michael Friedman is engaged in an unusual form of journalism. The composer, who has worked on shows including “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson” and “Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play,” is travelling the country talking to voters about what’s on their minds in this election, and then turning his interview transcripts into original songs. “The New Yorker Radio Hour” has been documenting his work. In California, Friedman spoke with a network-news producer whose jaded feelings about political coverage was shocked by Donald Trump’s hijacking of politics for entertainment
Presidential Campaigns Are Like Wildfires...

from The State of The Union Songbook
posted by y2karl on Jul 17, 2016 - 4 comments

America, America is Killing Its Youth

Henry Rollins reports that Alan Vega, vocalist for legendary proto-punk band Suicide, has died.
With profound sadness and a stillness that only news like this can bring, we regret to inform you that the great artist and creative force, Alan Vega has passed away. Alan passed peacefully in his sleep last night, July 16. He was 78 years of age
[more inside] posted by SansPoint on Jul 17, 2016 - 50 comments

Hey Blondie! You know what you are?

A condensed history of white rappers
posted by Artw on Jul 15, 2016 - 124 comments

Maybe you are that somebody

"We live in the Genius age, where every line of text and every bit of information is now annotated, searchable and definable. The digitization of music has served as a mass cataloging project for anyone interested in dissecting a track down to its molecular makeup. Supernumerary sounds on records, no matter how seemingly insignificant, can usually be traced to its source." - Who Was the Baby on Aaliyah’s “Are You That Somebody?”
posted by nadawi on Jul 15, 2016 - 22 comments

Music is Just Organized Noise

Culture, not biology, decides the difference between music and noise. “Consonance seems like such a simple phenomenon, and in Western music there’s strong supposition that it’s biological... But this study suggests culture is more important than many people acknowledge.” Study originally published in Nature.
posted by Joey Michaels on Jul 15, 2016 - 74 comments

Mount the air

I'll mount the air on swallow's wings, to find my dearest dear. And if I lose my labour and cannot find him there, I quickly will become a fish to search the roaring sea; I love my love because I know my lover he loves me.
posted by dng on Jul 14, 2016 - 3 comments

78rpm records from Africa

From Alger to Antananarivo – A selection of 78rpm records from Africa A Mixcloud mix.
posted by OmieWise on Jul 14, 2016 - 6 comments

A Girl Who Ages as Slow as Mountains

Using just the saxophone, violin, and their voices--and with no looping--saxophonist Colin Stetson and violinist Sarah Neufeld create incredibly layered and engrossing aural landscapes on their 2015 album Never were the way she was. Their video for "The rest of us", directed by Dan Huiting, is cinematic in its own right, but it's the driving gallop of the music that will stick with you. [more inside]
posted by yasaman on Jul 12, 2016 - 23 comments

Making musical lemonade out of Brexit

The internet has a field day with David Cameron’s sad little resignation song (SLAVClub).
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jul 12, 2016 - 28 comments

...and rise above

Bury It, the latest track from CHVRCHES, featuring Hayley Williams and with an outstanding video by comics artist Jamie McKelvie.
posted by Artw on Jul 11, 2016 - 39 comments

Bloody Fist: Aussies inviting malice from 1994 to 2004

In the 1990s, a group of Australian misfits who made anti-rave music [NSFW audio, present elsewhere, too], influenced by their local Newcastle industrial heritage and the international sounds of gabber. In 1994, they bashed out some tunes and pulled together enough money to make 102 hand-stamped records, officially starting Bloody Fist Records. The label gained recognition world-wide, but abruptly closed shop in 2004, and a decade later Bloody Fist was celebrated in Newcastle with Fistography, an exhibit to the history and legacy of the label. If you missed any of this the first time around, you can stream and buy much of the label's catalog on their Bandcamp page. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 10, 2016 - 18 comments

Because we need to unwind

Ma’agalim, a bitter-sweet music video by the Israeli band Jane Bordeaux [Youtube]
(N.B.: first link includes sketches and models.)
posted by Joe in Australia on Jul 10, 2016 - 8 comments

"I kinda yell Satanic stuff in a Gospel voice."

Devil Is Fine is the second album by Zeal and Ardor, a.k.a. Birdmask, a.k.a. Manuel Gagneux. For a taste of its "spiritual black metal blues," have a loud listen to "Blood In The River." The vocals are so gritty and authentic that he was accused of using unattributed samples from Smithsonian field recordings. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Jul 7, 2016 - 52 comments

meanwhile in remix art, video and the radio star hi-five

[Soda_Jerk vs The Avalanches] Jerry Seinfeld, Daria, Jay and Silent Bob and many more rub on-screen shoulders in The Was, an eye-and-ear-catching 14 minute collage short. The visual remix splices together scenes and characters from 129 different films and TV shows, and is made by NYC-via-Sydney art collective, Soda_Jerk. Fittingly, the short appears to be soundtracked by audio sampling maestros, The Avalanches, using tracks from The Avalanches' recently-released album Wildflower and alternative mixes. [more inside]
posted by Collaterly Sisters on Jul 6, 2016 - 19 comments

The VHS fever dream of early 2000s David Lee Roth [SLYT]

David Lee Roth's No Holds Bar-B-Que, long only available in bootleg form was released on Roth's youtube channel recently. Featuring surreal covers, low rent effects work, Benny Hill-esque skits, and Japanese sword arts. Dive in and get a taste.
posted by Ferreous on Jul 6, 2016 - 38 comments

Making Robots Dance Without Dancing the Robot

Making a Robot Dance to Music Using Chaotic Itinerancy in a Network of FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons "We propose a technique to make a robot execute free and solitary dance movements on music, in a manner which simulates the dynamic alternations between synchronisation and autonomy typicallyobserved in human behaviour."
posted by lucasgonze on Jul 5, 2016 - 8 comments

"I've been doing this for fifteen years." — the choreographer

While OK Go's progression from treadmill to unicycle to zero-gravity has broken all kinds of ground in ambitious, creative, music video, the new video for LA band AJJ's Goodbye, Oh Goodbye takes the form to entirely new places. Planned and choreographed over the course of six months, and shot in a single take in an LA warehouse, the video centers around a judicious use of... well, it's best left unspoiled. (Here's a making-of video, for the curious.)
posted by rorgy on Jul 4, 2016 - 106 comments

Rufus Wainwright and 1500 singers

HALLELUJAH [more inside]
posted by HuronBob on Jul 3, 2016 - 27 comments

"This note 'did not yet exist' on pianos"

A list of extremes of conventional music notation. "Conventional Western music notation is far more complex and subtle than most people think. In particular, it does not have well-defined borders; it just fades away indefinitely in all directions."
posted by Johnny Assay on Jul 1, 2016 - 25 comments

A plate of Björk and beans

In 1997, Björk interviewed musicians Alasdair Malloy, Mika Vainio, Tommi Grönlund, and Arvo Pärt in a two-part BBC documentary entitled Modern Minimalists - part I | part II
posted by a lungful of dragon on Jun 28, 2016 - 3 comments

Funky Funday Sunday

Breakestra is a funk band from Los Angeles. A sampling: Come On Over ft. AfrodyeteGetcho Soul TogethaJoyful NoiseCramp Your StyleLowdown StankFamily RapOn-air jam at KCRW [via L.A. Taco Radio]
posted by Room 641-A on Jun 26, 2016 - 6 comments

The Inspirational Capybara

The humble capybara inspires devotion... and music, such music. [more inside]
posted by dmd on Jun 26, 2016 - 20 comments

Tweedy live in Melbourne

Tweedy is Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy and his 18-year-old son Spencer. The father-son duo's debut album Sukierae, released in 2014, features 20 songs written by Jeff Tweedy with Spencer playing drums. Radio National's live music team caught Tweedy's recent Bluesfest sideshow at the Melbourne Recital Centre. [more inside]
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Jun 26, 2016 - 17 comments

Dive into the diverse sounds of Clorinde

If you look at nothing more than album titles, you'll get the impression that the duo of the brothers Andreas and Simone Salvatici, who record and perform as Clorinde, pull in a diverse set of sounds, from The Gardens of Bomarzo, named for the Italian park of stone monsters, to The Poetry of Charles B., with song titles pulled from Bukowski. If that's too vague, "Imagine an orchestral and oriental Efterklang reworking “Selected Ambient Works” by Aphex Twin." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 23, 2016 - 4 comments

“They’d tell me, 'Music is a hearing thing. It’s not for deaf people'."

Amber Galloway Gallego is an ASL-based music interpreter who has worked with Snoop Dogg, Kendrick Lamar, Destiny's Child, Paul McCartney, and many more rappers, R&B stars, and rock bands. Her YouTube channel is chock full of music interpretation for deaf audiences. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Jun 23, 2016 - 25 comments

Queer People Are Magical // Our Secrets are Transformative

BEND Our presence, our ability to live, leaves love notes for the seeds yet to bloom. [more inside]
posted by stoneweaver on Jun 22, 2016 - 6 comments

"Polish folk-techno or metalcore with Harry Potter fanfic lyrics. "

If You Do That, The Robots Win: Glenn McDonald, music critic and creator of Every Noise At Once talks about how algorithmic music recommendation happens:
So now I work at Spotify as a zookeeper for playlist-making robots. Recommendation robots have existed for a while now, but people have mostly used them for shopping. Go find me things I might want to buy. "You bought a snorkel, maybe you'd like to buy these other snorkels?" But what streaming music makes possible, which online music stores did not, is actual programmed music experiences. Instead of trying to sell you more snorkels, these robots can take you out to swim around with the funny-looking fish. And as robots begin to craft your actual listening experience, it is reasonable, and maybe even morally imperative, to ask if a playlist robot can have an authorial voice, and, if so, what it is?
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 22, 2016 - 24 comments

Help has arrived

What do you get when you give the directors of such music videos as DJ Snake & Lil' Jon's Turn Down for What [previously] or Manchester Orchestra's Simple Math [previously] a movie to direct? You get Swiss Army Man (trailer). And when you have a movie that features the magical, flatulent corpse played by Daniel Radcliffe, how do you promote it online? With a virtual swiss army man (warning: possibly NSFW for optional* full-screen video bikini-clad women and a .. helpful erection) [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 21, 2016 - 27 comments

Driving in a big circle around Iceland

Route One is a 24 hour live broadcast by Icelandic state television RÚV of a drive on the Ring Road, which goes all the way around Iceland. Underneath a procedurally generated 24 hour remix of a new Sigur Rós song called Óveður will be playing. It starts now.
posted by Kattullus on Jun 20, 2016 - 238 comments

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