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Dad; one of Warhol's "13 Most Wanted Men"

George Lawler always knew his father was a criminal — his mug shot had been on New York City’s most wanted list in 1962. What he did not know was that his father had been a muse, of sorts, for Andy Warhol. 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964 at The World's Fair site in Queens, NY. Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller had the work painted over before the Fair opened to the public.
posted by R. Mutt on Aug 22, 2014 - 6 comments

Apartment Houses of the Metropolis

10 Elaborate Floor Plans from Pre-World War I New York City Apartments
posted by nadawi on Aug 18, 2014 - 35 comments

SketchFactor

BigApps (previously) "is a competition that empowers the sharpest minds in tech, design, and business to solve NYC's toughest challenges." One of the finalists is the recently-launched SketchFactor, which aims to help users avoid "sketchy" neighborhoods by posting notes about crime, racial profiling, harassment, and desolation. Not surprisingly, the creators have faced racism accusations. The developers have responded to the charges on their website.
posted by girlmightlive on Aug 8, 2014 - 20 comments

Night at the Museum

Photographer Vivienne Gucwa attended the first ever adult sleepover at New York's American Museum of Natural History. (Photo set)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 8, 2014 - 16 comments

It's Been A Long, Long Time.

Are you trying to write a period-correct Captain America story or just have questions about NYC in the 1930s-40s in general? The tumblr Steve Rogers Is Historically Accurate is here to help.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 6, 2014 - 18 comments

Pennsylvania Six Five Oh Oh OH!

The oldest still-working telephone number in New York City is at least 80 years old. And you've probably heard of it: Pennsylvania 6-5000. It's the number of the Pennsylvania Hotel. Built in 1919 as a grand luxury destination, it has inspired a movie and a Bugs Bunny cartoon, Dada artwork, and of course became immortalized in song. [more inside]
posted by Mchelly on Jul 28, 2014 - 40 comments

Comatose Potato Salad

"Since first opening in 1934 in a converted sheepfold off 67th Street, on the western edge of Central Park, the storied franchise (which is still licensed by the Parks Department) has been a reliable hit. Joe Baum put the restaurant on the national culinary map during the 1960s, and when Warner LeRoy doubled the capacity several years later and added the famous Crystal Room, it became one of the great circus-dining destinations in the world. LeRoy’s heirs ran the profitable old production for years (in 2006, it was still the second-highest-grossing restaurant in the USA, behind Tao Las Vegas), until the great crash of 2008 brought their company to its knees. Now, after years of drama and delay, Tavern on the Green has opened its doors once again, this time under the direction of a hospitality operation originally from Philadelphia called the Emerald Green Group. " So begins Adam Platt's zero star review of the re-opened Tavern On The Green. Others have not been glowing. Even the Post got a few kicks in. Peter Wells' scathing takedown in the New York Times might be better experienced with some happy sheep.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 27, 2014 - 69 comments

Warning: Here be trolls

In a sixth floor walk-up on New York City's Lower East Side, you'll find The Troll Museum. Run by a woman in elf ears named Reverend Jen Miller, along with her pet chihuahua, Reverend Jen Jr., it's dedicated to her admitted obsession with vintage Troll Dolls and memorabilia. Admission is free, however there is a suggested donation of $3000. [more inside]
posted by Mchelly on Jul 24, 2014 - 24 comments

NYC's push to change elite high school admissions

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for changing the admissions criteria of NYC's elite high schools, arguing that relying solely on a single exam (the SHSAT) "creates a “rich-get-richer” dynamic that benefits the wealthy, who can afford expensive test prep. However, the reality is just the opposite. It’s not affluent whites, but rather the city’s burgeoning population of Asian-American immigrants — a group that, despite its successes, remains disproportionately poor and working-class — whose children have aced the exam in overwhelming numbers." [more inside]
posted by gemutlichkeit on Jul 20, 2014 - 73 comments

It Ain't No Fairy Tale

42nd St., NYC ca. 1988-1991 (Vaguely NSFW)
posted by griphus on Jul 15, 2014 - 72 comments

Hey, Taxi!

NYC Taxis: A Day in the Life - A Data Visualization displays the data for one random NYC yellow taxi on a single day in 2013. See where it operated, how much money it made, and how busy it was over 24 hours. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jul 14, 2014 - 30 comments

Moon Hooch

NPR's Bob Boilen (host of All Songs Considered): "People ask me all the time to name my favorite Tiny Desk Concert. It's my desk and I've seen almost all of the nearly 400 concerts up close. So you'd think this would be easy. Moon Hooch have made it a lot easier." (video) [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 10, 2014 - 41 comments

Drawing all the buildings in New York City.

All the Buildings in New York. James Gulliver Hancock, an Australian illustrator living in Astoria, draws buildings in New York City. Lots and lots of buildings. (NYTimes interview -- more press) (via) [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 10, 2014 - 7 comments

Ping City

A tour of the physical internet infrastructure of New York City From r/nyc. Also Previously.
posted by lalochezia on Jul 9, 2014 - 8 comments

The Pimps and Prostitutes of 1970s Times Square

From 1972 to 1982, Sheldon Nadelman worked as a bartender at the “roughest bar in town”—Terminal Bar, directly across from the Port Authority. When he wasn’t pouring drinks, Nadelman was taking photographs of his patrons. He had good material: as one regular put it, “through these doors pass some of the most miserable people on Earth.”
posted by josher71 on Jul 5, 2014 - 8 comments

The 1812 Overture and fireworks, as American as ... waitaminute

Every Fourth of July, Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture is heard all over the United States, timed to the burst of fireworks. How did this Russian composition, celebrating the Russian victory over the French in that War of 1812 (not the war between England and the US), become a staple of the United States' Independence Day celebrations? We can thank the Boston Pops. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 3, 2014 - 29 comments

No Bullshit Hiring Histories

"Pastry work takes a level of skill, precision and rigor that I lacked in spades. I could’ve maybe become a decent pastry cook, with months of practice and a patient boss, but I was in no way qualified to be a pastry chef. I gave it my best effort, for three days, until the chef-owner realized her mistake and fired me. The place closed in less than 6 months. I never got paid." Laurie Woolever at The Billfold talks about how she went from Botantical Garden Intern to Anthony Bourdain's assistant.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 3, 2014 - 26 comments

and thus began my morbid fascination

The Morbid Anatomy Museum, a treasure trove of pathological and funereal curiosities, antique medical models, and anatomical art pledged to "exploring the intersections of death, beauty, and that which falls between the cracks," has opened its doors to the public in Gowanus, Brooklyn. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Jul 1, 2014 - 18 comments

A Photographic Look at the Birth of Gay Pride

A Photographic Look at the Birth of Gay Pride
posted by scody on Jun 26, 2014 - 9 comments

pestilence is from the devil.

A federal judge in New York has ruled against a group of parents who had filed a lawsuit, asserting that the New York City policy that allows schools to ban unvaccinated kids from attending classes when another child has come down with a vaccine preventable illness infringed on their practice of religion. The decision cites Jacobson v. Massachusetts, 197 U.S. 11 (1905), where the SCOTUS upheld Cambridge, Mass, Board of Health’s authority to require vaccination against smallpox during a smallpox epidemic.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 23, 2014 - 88 comments

[largest amount of money you can possibly comprehend, plus $14,000]

[Special person A] took an [unbelievable number of weeks] paid leave from her job as a performance art archivist and digital [string of four arbitrary letters that suggest a marketing-related acronym] strategist to commit to the search. "It was scary," she whispered, "My apartment was well below market rate at $8,000 a month—how was I going to find what I needed on such a limited budget?"
-Mad Libs: New York Times Real Estate Edition
posted by griphus on Jun 23, 2014 - 25 comments

Lou Reed Lou Reed

Lou Reed Lou Reed [more inside]
posted by kittensofthenight on Jun 21, 2014 - 21 comments

Obelisk envy

Cleopatra's Needle, the 3,500 year old obelisk that has been installed in Central Park for the past century, is about to cleaned, with lasers.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 15, 2014 - 23 comments

these stories happened to so-and-so, they’re happening to us.

can theatre bring justice to homeless transgender youth?
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jun 11, 2014 - 1 comment

the life and daily struggle of a 72-year-old can collector

surviving in new york city, 5 cents at a time
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jun 5, 2014 - 29 comments

The Frogurt Is Also Cursed

A tumblr detailing how many businesses in NYC are now ...Fro-Yo places.
posted by The Whelk on May 28, 2014 - 148 comments

15 potential headquarters for the Illuminati: theories and conspiracies

The Complex City Guide has a bit of information on 15 possible headquarters for the Illuminati, but it's a slideshow with limited information, and there's a lot of information out there, so let's get into it. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2014 - 74 comments

CitiBiker

"This began my quest to find as many of the first 100 Citibikes as possible." [more inside]
posted by So You're Saying These Are Pants? on May 23, 2014 - 6 comments

"Everyone On Wall Street Is A Dick."

The two-day Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) graduate showcase at NYU was a madhouse, with some 100 projects on view, ranging from groundbreaking innovations to timely trinkets. But the most talked about project by far was Peiqi Su's "Penis Wall" - an array of 81 robotic phalli that rise and fall in response to the stock market. Official Vimeo account for the project - Thesis presentation - in depth How-it-was-made production blog. (Slightly NSFW if your work doesn't like white, plastic, abstract dicks.)
posted by The Whelk on May 23, 2014 - 14 comments

The 9/11 Museium Is Open

"The exhibition starts with one shining, unfathomably terrible morning and winds up as all of our lives, as banal and constant as laundry, bottomless.. . . I think now of every war memorial I ever yawned through on a class trip, how someone else’s past horror was my vacant diversion and maybe I learned something but I didn’t feel anything. Everyone should have a museum dedicated to the worst day of their life and be forced to attend it with a bunch of tourists from Denmark." [more inside]
posted by schroedinger on May 19, 2014 - 97 comments

Why Libraries Matter

A day in the life of New York City's public libraries: Traveling from borough to borough, this short documentary by Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks reveals just how important the modern library is for millions of people. Why Libraries Matter.
posted by cashman on May 17, 2014 - 6 comments

The Last Shot, 20 Years On

Amos Barshad of Grantland talks to Darcy Frey and the basketball players featured in the classic book The Last Shot 20 years after the book's release.
posted by reenum on May 15, 2014 - 1 comment

16. People who haven't left yet.

101 Things To Love About NYC, 1976
via and glossed by Scouting NY
posted by griphus on May 9, 2014 - 52 comments

"...they’re all saying the same thing: This was a good kid."

Staten Island, long a blue-collar bastion of police officers and other New York City workers, is confronting a heroin epidemic. Thirty-six people died from heroin overdoses in 2012, the highest number in at least a decade, according to the most recent available city health department records; the death rate was higher than the city’s other four boroughs had seen in 10 years.
Heroin’s New Hometown
posted by griphus on May 8, 2014 - 65 comments

Manners are sort of my thing, and I’d love to teach you some.

Passive Aggressive Missed Connections
posted by roomthreeseventeen on May 8, 2014 - 99 comments

The NYC Neighborhood Where It Looks Like the Apocalypse Just Happened

"I’m fascinated by organic neighborhoods that somehow manage to survive despite the gentrification of the city, and I’m not sure there’s a better example of this than Willets Point. Rundown, polluted, forgotten, and undervaluing its land, a place like Willets Point is the complete antithesis of everything New York has become today." - A photo essay by Slate's Nick Carr
posted by Slap*Happy on May 1, 2014 - 93 comments

Everyone tries to do a pull up, everyone.

Video proof that being all alone in a subway car causes madness in passengers
posted by The Whelk on Apr 28, 2014 - 54 comments

American Museum of Natural Unlocks 1000's Of Old Photos

The American Museum of Natural History will unlock thousands of old photos from their vault, they announced this week. The new online image database (officially launching on Monday the 28th) will take you behind the curtain, delivering images that span the 145-year history of the Museum. The collection features over 7,000 images—many never before seen by the public—and includes photos, rare book illustrations, drawings, notes, letters, art, and Museum memorabilia. They say "it’s like stepping into a time machine and seeing a long ago NYC or just catching glimpses of ghosts from a forgotten world now seen only by researchers and Museum staff." Previously. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Apr 24, 2014 - 6 comments

The Broadway community has always been at the forefront of this issue

If you go to see a Broadway or off-Broadway show this June, the masthead of your Playbill will look a little different; for the first time in its 130 year history, the program, along with their digital properties and social media sites will turn rainbow during the last week of June to commemorate Pride weeks in New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, and other major cities around the world.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 19, 2014 - 4 comments

word has it, he got a deal for only $2350/month

An army of NYPD cops on Thursday evicted a homeless man from his Manhattan Bridge "home" — which was complete with a gas heater, hot sauce and beer.
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Apr 17, 2014 - 59 comments

A Floating Population

"81 Bowery - one of the last standing lodging houses in New York City has been home for more than a generation of immigrant Chinese laborers who work at construction sites and kitchens throughout Chinatown. Today, dozens of individuals are left sharing the fourth floor - each occupying a 64-square-foot cubicle." [more inside]
posted by pravit on Apr 14, 2014 - 10 comments

Life Rolls On

"Pssssttt! What does the yellow light mean?"
"Slow down."
"What... does... the... yellow... light... mean?"
"Slow down!"
"Whaaaaaat... dooooeeees... theeeee... yeeeelllllllllllooowwww... liiiiight... meeeeeeaaaaan?"
"Slow down!!!"
"Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat…." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Apr 11, 2014 - 56 comments

A Song Of Rent And Maintenance

An apartment for sale off NYC's tony Gramercy Park has been made up to look like a medieval castle.
posted by The Whelk on Apr 10, 2014 - 54 comments

Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray released the book "Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York." In it, they documented the facades of the rapidly disappearing mom-and-pop businesses of New York City. Now they've revisited some of the same spots.
posted by Crane Shot on Apr 4, 2014 - 103 comments

The Little Prince at The Morgan Library

The Little Prince: A New York Story As he prepared to leave the city to rejoin the war effort as a reconnaissance pilot, Saint-Exupéry appeared at his friend Silvia Hamilton's door wearing his military uniform. "I'd like to give you something splendid," he said, "but this is all I have." He tossed a rumpled paper bag onto her entryway table. Inside were the manuscript and drawings for The Little Prince, which the Morgan acquired from her in 1968. [more inside]
posted by R. Mutt on Apr 3, 2014 - 16 comments

Keep your Cadburys, make mine Fabergé

New York City is hosting the Fabergé Big Egg Hunt from April 1 - 17. [more inside]
posted by Sweetie Darling on Apr 3, 2014 - 15 comments

Hidden treasures, in drying lakes and rivers, and in NYC street cracks

The drought in California has brought about a number of things, from exposing part of Mormon Island, an old mining town that has partially emerged from Folsom Lake (news coverage clip; aerial view of a re-emerged bridge with overly dramatic music; a tour of the exposed ruins), to being good news for gold prospectors. But if there's too much of a crowd in the Sierra Nevada foothills, you can always dig for gold in New York City (alt: YouTube), in the cracks of Midtown's Diamond District with Raffi Stepanian.
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 1, 2014 - 6 comments

The NYPL's Open Maps Project adds 20,000 High Res Maps

The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high resolution cartographic works (maps!) for free, to view and download. "We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions." All can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page and downloaded through their Map Warper. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2014 - 11 comments

The SHSAT is a diagnostic, the canary in the coal mine.

Bill De Blasio blamed the lack of racial diversity in New York City's top high schools, such as Stuyvesant, on the standardized admissions test, and campaigned on ending it. The New York Times has written pieces reminding of it. But the parent of a biracial son attending Stuyvesant has a different argument: that the problem is not with the test, but with the substandard education system that dominates much of New York City.
"By having these pathetic SHSAT results publicized year after year, it shines a light on just what an awful job inner city schools are doing educating those students who can’t afford to buy their way out of a broken system, either through private schools or private tutoring centers. If the specialized high schools’ racial balances were “fixed,” we might be tempted to consider the problems they expose 'fixed,' too."

posted by corb on Mar 26, 2014 - 165 comments

Boy About Town

What 11-Year-Old Kareem Granton Saw During 5 Days Roaming New York City (Warning: Slideshow format, but with original artwork.) [more inside]
posted by Pfardentrott on Mar 24, 2014 - 32 comments

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