306 posts tagged with NYC and newyork.
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New York City’s zoning code turns 100 this year.

40 Percent of the Buildings in Manhattan Could Not Be Built Today
posted by Michele in California on May 20, 2016 - 12 comments

"as valuable as government bonds, and dangerous"

How America's First Supermodel Was Nearly Erased From History: The Sad Life of Audrey Munson - Miss Manhattan - Civic Fame - Queen Of The Artists' Studios - Descending Night[readme] who dies alone in an insane asylum. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 9, 2016 - 6 comments

The Savior of the Great American City

If New York City were Middle Earth, Sauron would doubtless be portrayed by Robert Moses, destroying neighborhood after neighborhood in his own endless quest for greater power and a lifeless personal vision of the city that had no thoughts of its inhabitants. But when he set his eyes on leveling SoHo and Little Italy for a ten-lane expressway across Lower Manhattan, he ran up against an unlikely Frodo. Jane Jacobs would have been 100 years old today.
posted by Navelgazer on May 4, 2016 - 9 comments

Living just enough, just enough for the city

1993, Manhattan – someone films test footage for an early HD video format called D-VHS.
SLYT, make sure to switch to 1080p60 for best quality
posted by timshel on Apr 25, 2016 - 35 comments

that bad that hard that street

Kevin Heldman asks What The Hell Happened In East New York? It's Broken. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 12, 2016 - 10 comments

the far away shore

Vilray Bolles and Damon Hankoff perform On A Slow Boat to China in the NYC Subway
posted by Potomac Avenue on Apr 8, 2016 - 3 comments

It's north of where I live, obviously

Where The Hell is Upstate New York? With the $15/hour minimum wage set to take effect across New York State in a complex fashion (geographically and otherwise), and the arrival of primary candidates in New York State, Gothamist explore the time-old question of where exactly upstate New York is and interviews scholars and historians whose opinions (surprise!) differ.
posted by andrewesque on Apr 7, 2016 - 104 comments

“Whoops, I lost me muff!”

Arno the socialite stayed at the Ritz-Carlton until dawn, keeping Frazier company, and was captured in photos holding her hand while the 17-year-old looks utterly exhausted by the event. (She was.) Five nights earlier, Arno the satirist and his friends—publisher Condé Nast and George Balanchine among them—held a well-publicized debut at the nightclub Chez Firehouse for Miss Wilma Baard. A fashion model, Baard had spent much of her childhood on a Hoboken tugboat captained by her father, so reporters at the event dubbed it the debut of “Tugboat Minnie.” “I think most debutantes are dopes,” she told reporters. While Arno and his friends worked the receiving line in shifts, she stood there for hours, saying only of society that it made “my feet hurt.” - The Double Life of Peter Arno, The New Yorker's Most Influental Cartoonist by Ben Schwartz (NSFW warning: butts)
posted by The Whelk on Apr 6, 2016 - 26 comments

"Skirt the rules but don’t break them."

People who move to New York always make the same mistake. They can’t see the place. This is true of Manhattan, but even the outer boroughs too. Whether Flushing Meadows in Queens or Red Hook in Brooklyn. They come looking for magic, whether evil or good, and nothing will convince them it isn’t here. This wasn’t all bad though. Some New Yorkers had learned how to make a living from this error in thinking. Charles Thomas Tester for one.
an excerpt, The Ballad of Black Tom, Victor LaValle
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 8, 2016 - 10 comments

Dead, but they'll be back

The new mayor's shallow pockets, the abandoned fairgrounds, and the battle for New York City -- Stereogum explains how and why there's a new music festival on Randall's Island this summer.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Jan 26, 2016 - 11 comments

Continuous Until 4 AM

Photos of everyday life in 1950s NYC found in an attic decades later.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 26, 2015 - 41 comments

"Owning a Frenchie is not for the faint of heart."

WHY FRENCH BULLDOGS (AND THEIR OWNERS) ARE THE WORST: A RANT
Generations of unwise inbreeding to no good end, far beyond what would be needed to keep their signature looks, have left these cartoon critters with low resistance to illness and allergies. Physically handicapped at birth (by cesarean, because the heads are, like the owners' pride, inflated) with squashed-in faces that are freakishly flat, they face serious challenges in performing some of any mammal's basic functions — like getting enough oxygen and keeping their bodies at a safe temperature.

French Bulldogs are NYC’s Most Popular Dog
posted by andoatnp on Dec 17, 2015 - 98 comments

Did you say the Hippodrome?

The Delights and Perils of Navigating New York City with a Guidebook from 1899, in which Luke Spencer at Atlas Obscura spends a weekend with the 1899 Baedeker guide to NYC.
posted by Stacey on Nov 19, 2015 - 17 comments

Philip Glass: Taxi Driver

Philip Glass revisits his parallel lives in 1970s New York - driving a taxicab through threatening twilight streets while emerging as a composer in Manhattan's downtown arts scene.
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Nov 4, 2015 - 13 comments

Old NYC

Old NYC Mapping New York City (and beyond) using old photos from the NYPL.
posted by ColdChef on Oct 26, 2015 - 12 comments

Balancing Safety with Sieverts

"In New York City, the police now maintain an unknown number of military-grade vans outfitted with X-ray radiation, enabling cops to look through the walls of buildings or the sides of trucks ... The NYPD will not reveal when, where, or how often they are used."
posted by tocts on Oct 21, 2015 - 46 comments

I Presume You Mean Computers And So Forth?

"I found this collection of outtakes in my archive. I shot these interviews on the streets of New York in the late 70s when I was doing a documentary on the coming of the information age." - Man on the street interviews with New Yorkers in 1979 about science, technology, corporate influence, computers, and paperwork. (SLYT 5:45)
posted by The Whelk on Sep 23, 2015 - 17 comments

Onward, intrepid hero.

New York rat drags a slice of pizza down subway steps. Insert joke about inferiority of your preferred regional pizza here.
posted by phunniemee on Sep 21, 2015 - 111 comments

Higher Education and Real Estate: Two Bubbles Come Together in NYC

Felix Salmon reports on the continuing saga of Cooper Union (previously on MetaFilter). With NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's recent intervention, the school appears ready to stop digging its financial grave, but blocks away, faculty, staff, and students believe a similar story is playing out with New York University's NYU 2031 initiative. The plan, described as "a real estate deal" in a private conversation with an NYU trustee, is the brainchild of controversial NYU president John Sexton. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Sep 7, 2015 - 23 comments

We The People

On Sunday, a few hundred people rallied in Bainbridge, New York, a village of 3,300 between Binghamton and Oneonta, to promote the idea of upstate secession.
posted by griphus on Sep 1, 2015 - 103 comments

"You can't move to New York City unless you're not afraid to fail."

Millennials of New York. True stories from real millennials living in New York City.
posted by grouse on Aug 13, 2015 - 31 comments

“Turtles are allowed, but no photography.”

What do an alpaca, a turtle, a snake, a pig, and a turkey have in common? They're all animals that New Yorker writer Patricia Marx passed off as emotional support animals, with varying results.
posted by carrienation on Aug 9, 2015 - 67 comments

An In-Depth History of One Block of Greene Street in SoHo, NYC

The entirety of Greene Street in SoHo is pretty short, as New York City streets go -- just five blocks long. Walk along it today between Houston and Prince Streets and you’ll pass an Apple Store, a Ralph Lauren store, and a variety of other high-end retailers. A hundred and forty years ago, you’d be walking by brothels. A new website, The Greene Street Project: A Long History of a Short Block, covers more than four hundred years of that one block section -- just 486 feet long -- illustrated with photographs, maps, newspaper clippings, survey data, and charts. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 6, 2015 - 4 comments

A “highly curated community of like-minded individuals.”

The Millennial Commune
posted by overeducated_alligator on Jul 31, 2015 - 52 comments

"You can go wild on the wall, everything that comes to your imagination"

"The thing I find very exciting is waiting for the subway train and sometimes you'll get a glorious one that arrives decorated like a birthday cake!" Watching My Name Go By is a short 1976 BBC documentary about graffiti, artists, and graffiti artists in New York City. The film is based on Norman Mailer's 1974 essay for Esquire magazine, "The Faith of Grafitti." [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Jul 16, 2015 - 5 comments

I’m never seeing my Astoria friends again!

But as the city transformed into an exceedingly safe and exceedingly expensive place to live over the past two decades, it’s not only the crime and the pervasive decay that have fallen away, but the close proximity, creating a social commute that echoes and exacerbates a work commute that, at more than six hours a week, is the longest in the nation. People have always traveled to see their friends, of course, but rarely has it been so frequent or far to qualify as a commute
The Social Commute: How the Big Schlep Is Changing the Way New Yorkers Live
posted by griphus on May 21, 2015 - 148 comments

A gorgeously tiled and carved Moroccan court, at a reduced scale

Building the Moroccan Court at the Metropolitan Museum of Art [slyt, 17m44s] "In 2011, The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, which house the Museum's renowned collection of Islamic art. A vital part of the installation was the Patti Cadby Birch Court, a Moroccan court built by a team of experts—from curators and historians to designers and craftsmen—over many months.... This video documents a marvelous journey from Fez to New York, and the creation of a twenty-first-century court using traditional fifteenth-century methods."
posted by ocherdraco on May 20, 2015 - 5 comments

We Are Always Listening

Eavesdropping on the population has revealed many saying “I’m not doing anything wrong so who cares if the NSA tracks what I say and do?”

Citizens don’t seem to mind this monitoring, so we’re hiding recorders in public places in hopes of gathering information to help win the war on terror. We've started with NYC as a pilot program, but hope to roll the initiative out all across The Homeland.
[more inside] posted by Elementary Penguin on May 20, 2015 - 58 comments

I hear you can turn left on a red, too.

"In some quarters, the scorn that New Yorkers once piled on Los Angeles is now sounding like envy." (SLNYT) "Indeed, Los Angeles has seemingly become the flight fantasy of choice for the likes of Ms. Turner, who insists that anything good she was giving up in overpriced, overstressed Brooklyn is already in place on the booming east side of Los Angeles: the in-season Zambian coffee outposts, the galleries, the vintage clothing boutiques."
posted by persona au gratin on May 5, 2015 - 109 comments

They don’t see themselves as victims … but it’s not empowering for them

The Urban Institute has released (PDF) the first study to focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth; young men who have sex with men (YMSM); and young women who have sex with women (YWSW) who get involved in the commercial sex market in order to meet basic survival needs, such as food or shelter.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 25, 2015 - 7 comments

Bonobo, inspired by beautiful hip-hop, London scenes, and a tumble dryer

From the rather common "skate punk into alternative music" origins to a bedroom producer who signed with Ninja Tune, Bonobo, the stage name for Simon Green, has continued to change musically. From the lone musician who made sample-based music, he has expanded into working with field recordings, studio musicians, and live shows where the band took a four bar drum break transformed it into a seven minute epic drum-sax solo battle, to which the crowd tried to clap along. You can see him live tomorrow at the Alexandra Palace in London in a special Boiler Room session, but until then, there's plenty more to see, hear and read. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 27, 2014 - 12 comments

Show the elephant, in the Bowery, with Mose the Fireboy

Mose the Fireboy, the Bowery B'hoy (and fireman) [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 22, 2014 - 4 comments

Research methods: the heart and soul of knowledge

Hollaback and Why Everyone Needs Better Research Methods (And Why All Data Needs Theory), by Zeynep Tufekci:
I’ve taught "introduction to research methods" to undergraduate students for many years, and they would sometimes ask me why they should care about all this "method stuff", besides having a required class for a sociology major out of the way. I would always tell them, without understanding research methods, you cannot understand how to judge what you see.

The Hollaback video shows us exactly why.
[more inside] posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Nov 5, 2014 - 23 comments

Add it up and there outta be more

So wait, there's a band with Jim Jarmusch on keys and a bunch of experimental Horror film directors that released a record in the early 80s of spooky surf-funk and you're NOT listening to it today? Get on it y'all. It's the story of The Del-Byzanteens. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 31, 2014 - 8 comments

New York State Of Mind

When you bring a four-year-old to the Big Apple, things get weird.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Oct 30, 2014 - 4 comments

I have no idea how these people got their cats wedged into their boedgas

Last Week, Buzzfeed posted "110 Reasons Why You Should Never Leave New York City," which is somehow even more vapid than you'd expect it to be. Today, Brooklyn Magazine reviewed the list, and offered some feedback.
posted by schmod on Oct 20, 2014 - 135 comments

Taxis, Rainbows and Stars

Earlier this year, Chris Whong made a FOIL request to the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission, receiving fare and trip data for all licensed cabs in New York in 2013. (previously) The data was anonymised, but as Vijay Pandurangan realised, only partially. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Oct 16, 2014 - 13 comments

Worst. Landlord. Ever.

The Public Advocate for the City of New York has released an interactive map, The NYC Landord Watchlist, which maps the city's most poorly managed buildings. The map uses data from the Department of Housing Preservation and Development to list over 6,800 buildings across New York. You can search the map by address and by borough. If you select a property listed on the map you can view the number and type of violations it has received. [via]
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 13, 2014 - 27 comments

Gentrification, Inc.

How one developer is attracting the 'right kind of people' to new locales with, among others things, dance parties.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 24, 2014 - 107 comments

NYC's push to change elite high school admissions

NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for changing the admissions criteria of NYC's elite high schools, arguing that relying solely on a single exam (the SHSAT) "creates a “rich-get-richer” dynamic that benefits the wealthy, who can afford expensive test prep. However, the reality is just the opposite. It’s not affluent whites, but rather the city’s burgeoning population of Asian-American immigrants — a group that, despite its successes, remains disproportionately poor and working-class — whose children have aced the exam in overwhelming numbers." [more inside]
posted by gemutlichkeit on Jul 20, 2014 - 73 comments

Drawing all the buildings in New York City.

All the Buildings in New York. James Gulliver Hancock, an Australian illustrator living in Astoria, draws buildings in New York City. Lots and lots of buildings. (NYTimes interview -- more press) (via) [more inside]
posted by Ufez Jones on Jul 10, 2014 - 7 comments

A Photographic Look at the Birth of Gay Pride

A Photographic Look at the Birth of Gay Pride
posted by scody on Jun 26, 2014 - 9 comments

Lou Reed Lou Reed

Lou Reed Lou Reed [more inside]
posted by kittensofthenight on Jun 21, 2014 - 21 comments

the life and daily struggle of a 72-year-old can collector

surviving in new york city, 5 cents at a time
posted by and they trembled before her fury on Jun 5, 2014 - 29 comments

The Last Shot, 20 Years On

Amos Barshad of Grantland talks to Darcy Frey and the basketball players featured in the classic book The Last Shot 20 years after the book's release.
posted by reenum on May 15, 2014 - 1 comment

Life Rolls On

"Pssssttt! What does the yellow light mean?"
"Slow down."
"What... does... the... yellow... light... mean?"
"Slow down!"
"Whaaaaaat... dooooeeees... theeeee... yeeeelllllllllllooowwww... liiiiight... meeeeeeaaaaan?"
"Slow down!!!"
"Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat…." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Apr 11, 2014 - 56 comments

Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray released the book "Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York." In it, they documented the facades of the rapidly disappearing mom-and-pop businesses of New York City. Now they've revisited some of the same spots.
posted by Crane Shot on Apr 4, 2014 - 103 comments

The NYPL's Open Maps Project adds 20,000 High Res Maps

The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high resolution cartographic works (maps!) for free, to view and download. "We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions." All can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page and downloaded through their Map Warper. (Via) [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 31, 2014 - 11 comments

a clear, logical, geometrical ending

After 12 years of anticipation, the tallest skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere is ready for its close-up. How 10,000 workers lifted 104 floors, gave new life to an international symbol and created one spectacular view.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 8, 2014 - 47 comments

Below West 38th Street

The lost cow tunnels of New York: truth or fiction?
posted by MartinWisse on Feb 25, 2014 - 26 comments

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