563 posts tagged with NYtimes.
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that this dowager ball park should be destroyed by a ball

It came up rain, a gray somber rain that put a frown on the careworn face of Pittsburgh. My window was streaked with erratic wet lines that made me think of a small child crying. Rain meant disappointment to thousands of fans—and a doubleheader to broadcast—and it meant that on that wet afternoon, I was face to face with the biggest enemy on the road… time
In September 1965, legendary broadcaster Vin Scully wrote guest column for the times.
posted by Sokka shot first on Oct 9, 2015 - 4 comments

“...and at the time he was everybody’s favorite dad.”

To Revoke or Not: Colleges That Gave Cosby Honors Face a Tough Question by Sydney Ember and Colin Moynihan [New York Times]
Few people in American history have been recognized by universities as often as Mr. Cosby, whose publicist once estimated that the entertainer had collected more than 100 honorary degrees. The New York Times, in a quick search, found nearly 60. But now, as dozens of women have come forward to accuse Mr. Cosby of sexual assault, colleges across the country are confronting the question of what to do when someone who has been honored falls from grace.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Oct 7, 2015 - 61 comments

“People always leave traces. No person is without a shadow.”

Henning Mankell, Dean of Scandinavian Noir Writers, Dies at 67 [The New York Times]
Henning Mankell, the Swedish novelist and playwright best known for police procedurals that were translated into a score of languages and sold by the millions throughout the world, died Monday morning in Goteborg, Sweden. He was 67. Mr. Mankell was considered the dean of the so-called Scandinavian noir writers who gained global prominence for novels that blended edge-of-your-seat suspense with flawed, compelling protagonists and strong social themes. The genre includes Arnaldur Indridason of Iceland, Jo Nesbo of Norway and Stieg Larsson of Sweden, among others.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Oct 5, 2015 - 34 comments

“Scarves fit well w/the greater variety and more casual, youthful look,”

The Understated Elegance of the Airline Scarf by Troy Patterson [New York Times]
“Though the scarf coordinates with contemporary gender politics, it also conjures an old romance of the skies, stirring visions of aviators in open cockpits with white silk rippling at their throats and of fighter pilots wearing flight scarves printed with roaring beasts. It is also polymorphously practical. Heather Poole, a flight attendant and writer, has described scarves deployed as ad hoc bikini tops, improvised curtain ties and all-purpose utility tools: “I’ve seen a scarf used as a lanyard, a belt, a sweatband, a ponytail holder, a napkin and a compression bandage.”
posted by Fizz on Sep 27, 2015 - 20 comments

“Each person that has difficulty has different reasons,”

Can’t Swallow a Pill? There’s Help for That [New York Times]
Most children start swallowing pills around age 10, said Dr. Tanya Altmann, a pediatrician in Calabasas, Calif., and a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Pediatrics. And 20 percent to 40 percent are unable to swallow a standard-size pill or capsule, according to a recent study in the journal Pediatrics. [...] Many never outgrow the problem.
[more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 22, 2015 - 76 comments

> 200,000 people killed in the four-and-a-half-year Syrian Civil War.

Death in Syria by Karen Yourish, K.K. Rebecca Lai and Derek Watkins [New York Times]
“With each passing day there are fewer safe places in Syria,” Paulo Sérgio Pinheiro, chairman of the United Nations panel investigating human rights abuses in Syria, wrote in a recent report. “Everyday decisions — whether to visit a neighbor, to go out to buy bread— have become, potentially, decisions about life and death.”
posted by Fizz on Sep 14, 2015 - 15 comments

“The fanny pack is not just useful; it’s a unifying force.”

Letter of Recommendation: Fanny Packs by Jaime Lowe [New York Times]
“For too long, the fanny pack’s cultural baggage has prevented potential adoptees from embracing its sheer practicality. To the unenlightened, fanny packs are synony­mous with the ugly American: the perfect accessory for extra-large, convenience-obsessed people. But to me they promote the greatest of our nation’s ideals: freedom.”
posted by Fizz on Sep 4, 2015 - 125 comments

The Summer That Never Was

"I suspect that the way I feel now, at summer's end, is about how I'll feel at the end of my life, assuming I have time and mind enough to reflect: bewildered by how unexpectedly everything turned out, regretful about all the things I didn't get around to, clutching the handful of friends and funny stories I've amassed, and wondering where it all went. And I'll probably still be evading the same truth I'm evading now: that the life I ended up with, much as I complain about it, was pretty much the one I chose. And my dissatisfactions with it are really my own character, with my hesitation and timidity." (slNYT)
posted by Kitteh on Aug 31, 2015 - 39 comments

“producing much fruit, or foliage, or many offspring”

Can a Novelist Be Too Productive? by Stephen King [New York Times] [Op-Ed]
“No one in his or her right mind would argue that quantity guarantees quality, but to suggest that quantity never produces quality strikes me as snobbish, inane and demonstrably untrue.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 28, 2015 - 112 comments

The Closing of the Canadian Mind

Americans have traditionally looked to Canada as a liberal haven, with gun control, universal health care and good public education. But the nine and half years of Mr. Harper’s tenure have seen the slow-motion erosion of that reputation for open, responsible government. His stance has been a know-nothing conservatism, applied broadly and effectively. He has consistently limited the capacity of the public to understand what its government is doing, cloaking himself and his Conservative Party in an entitled secrecy, and the country in ignorance.
posted by standardasparagus on Aug 14, 2015 - 78 comments

“What makes America special is our capacity to change.”

President Obama’s Letter to the Editor [New York Times]
For the cover story of our Aug. 2 issue, Jim Rutenberg wrote about efforts over the last 50 years to dismantle the protections in the Voting Rights Act of 1965 [previously], the landmark piece of legislation that cleared barriers between black voters and the ballot. The story surveyed a broad sweep of history and characters, from United States Chief Justice John Roberts to ordinary citizens like 94-year-old Rosanell Eaton, a plaintiff in the current North Carolina case arguing to repeal voting restrictions enacted in 2013. The magazine received an unusual volume of responses to this article, most notably from President Barack Obama.
posted by Fizz on Aug 12, 2015 - 21 comments

“This is the literature of Louisiana.”

Patter and Patois by Walter Mosley [New York Times] Walter Mosley writes about his relationship to the literature of Louisiana.
“Louisiana flowed in that blood and across those tongues. Louisiana — a state made famous by Walt Whitman and Tennessee Williams, Ernest Gaines and Arna Bontemps, Kate Chopin and Anne Rice. These writers, from many eras, races and genres, took the voices of the people and distilled them into the passionate, almost desperate, stories that opened readers to a new kind of suffering and exultation.”
posted by Fizz on Aug 8, 2015 - 1 comment

How 'The New York Times' Bungled the Hillary Clinton Emails Story

"Democracy is not a game. It is not a means of getting our names on the front page or setting the world abuzz about our latest scoop."
posted by East Manitoba Regional Junior Kabaddi Champion '94 on Jul 26, 2015 - 46 comments

Is this a selfie?

Is this a selfie?
posted by alms on Jul 22, 2015 - 76 comments

Taylor Swift Is Not Your Friend

Dayna Evans writes about Taylor Swift for Gawker: [T]he part of Taylor’s persona that doesn’t get talked about enough [is that] she is a ruthless, publicly capitalist pop star. To think of her as womanhood incarnate is to trick oneself into forgetting about “Bad Blood” and “Better Than Revenge.” Swift isn’t here to help women—she’s here to make bank… Her plan—to be as famous and as rich as she can possibly be—is working, and by using other women as tools of her self-promotion, she is distilling feminism for her own benefit. [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Jul 22, 2015 - 180 comments

“The moderatocracy lives on inside us all.”

When the Internet’s ‘Moderators’ Are Anything But [New York Times] The title suggests a steward of civility and decency. But online, unpaid moderators can become a force for mayhem. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jul 21, 2015 - 60 comments

The Bronze Patriarchy

Fighting to Bring Women in History to Central Park [New York Times]
For Myriam Miedzian, a former philosophy professor who lives on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, the need to correct the gender imbalance is obvious. She cites as evidence a bronze equestrian statue of King Jagiello near her home. “What is a 14th-century Polish king doing in Central Park?” she said.
posted by lunch on Jul 19, 2015 - 44 comments

No one wants a nutty hypothalamus

Coining brr-geoisie, Daniel Engber suggests in Slate that "the case against AC has always been more a moral judgment than a scientific one", responding to the idea that America is "over air-conditioned" as argued in this article by Kate Murphy in the NY Times.
posted by numaner on Jul 10, 2015 - 178 comments

“This is stuff that is not floating in the harbor.”

Remnant of Boston’s Brutal Winter Threatens to Outlast Summer [more inside]
posted by Elementary Penguin on Jul 7, 2015 - 54 comments

New York Times? Get a rope!

The New York Times suggests putting peas in your guacamole. Following up on a suggestion it made two years ago, the Times is offering a guacamole recipe from ABC Cocina in Union Square: a collaboration between the restaurant's chef-owner, Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and his chef de cuisine, Ian Coogan, that contains green peas. The suggestion has been met with dismay from guacamole-lovers around the country, including the President himself. But it's not a political issue: in Texas, for instance, Republicans and Democrats alike agree that the New York Times shouldn't mess with guacamole.
posted by immlass on Jul 1, 2015 - 151 comments

Not Necessarily the New York Times

The Romenesko journalism blog has become aware of some links to nytimes.com.co for some - interesting - stories that are currently getting Facebook 'link juice', including:
WI Gov. Scott Walker Challenges Supreme Court Justices to Fist Fight
Marcus Bachmann Files For Divorce, Fresh on Heels of SCOTUS Ruling
Kanye West Calls Brown v. Board Of Education ‘Best Supreme Court Decision Of All Time’
The unlabeled parody stories are re-postings of material from the equally unlabeled parody site National Report, with over 300 stories going back four months.
Previously, the Newspaper of Record had only taken 36 hours to C&D nytimes.cat [more inside]
posted by oneswellfoop on Jun 29, 2015 - 16 comments

“We look for people who are isolated,” he said.

A Detailed Look At How ISIS Recruits Young Americans Online [SLNYT]
posted by Itaxpica on Jun 27, 2015 - 29 comments

The last word in pictures since pictures spoke their first word

When the new TimesMachine re-launched in 2013... it gave those of us interested in design history an additional benefit while perusing each day’s issue. They left the advertisements in. [more inside]
posted by Mchelly on Jun 25, 2015 - 3 comments

A Month of Ties

"We set a few rules. The ties had to be worn all day. There would be no hiding under sweaters. And they had to be worn in order. I’d work my way down from the top layer to the bottom, taking what the box gave me, regardless of the day’s events. Also, there’d be no excuses or explanations. If asked about a tie that was as wide as a flapjack, I could say only, “It was my father’s.”"
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jun 21, 2015 - 29 comments

“The dreams are the skeleton of all reality.”

James Salter, a ‘Writer’s Writer’ Short on Sales but Long on Acclaim, Dies at 90 [New York Times]
James Salter, whose intimately detailed novels and short stories kept a small but devoted audience in his thrall for more than half a century, died on Friday in Sag Harbor, N.Y. He was 90. His wife, Kay Eldredge, confirmed his death, saying he had been at a physical therapy session. He lived in Bridgehampton, N.Y. Mr. Salter wrote slowly, exactingly and, by almost every critic’s estimation, beautifully. Michael Dirda once observed in The Washington Post that “he can, when he wants, break your heart with a sentence.”
Previously. Previously.
posted by Fizz on Jun 20, 2015 - 14 comments

“Many atheists are still in the closet,”

Wanted: A Theology of Atheism by Molly Werthen [New York Times] [Op-Ed] What do people who don’t believe in God believe instead?
posted by Fizz on May 31, 2015 - 176 comments

What would comedy be without the potential for ... humiliating defeat?

Can China take a joke? The NYT Magazine examines the growing standup comedy scene in China, and its complicated relationship with traditional Chinese "cross-talk" performances, and modern Chinese society. [previously on metafilter]
posted by firechicago on May 24, 2015 - 2 comments

Class of 2015

via NYT: "Each year, we put out a call for college application essays about money, work and social class. This year, we picked seven -- about pizza, parental sacrifice, prep school students, discrimination and deprivation."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on May 21, 2015 - 3 comments


When Birds Squawk, Other Species Seem to Listen by Christopher Solomon [New York Times]
A professor’s hunch is that birds are saying much more in warning of danger than previously suspected, and that other animals have evolved to understand the signals.
posted by Fizz on May 18, 2015 - 28 comments

“I turn right, toward Tokyo.”

In Flight [New York Times] [Interactive] En route from London to Tokyo, a pilot’s-eye view of life in the sky.
posted by Fizz on May 16, 2015 - 18 comments

Lards of the Flies

In China, Pigs Are Flying. Almost. [New York Times]
"With summer almost here, swine across China are jumping or being shoved off platforms and splashing into pools and ponds, where they bob around before paddling to shore."
posted by Fizz on May 8, 2015 - 8 comments

Welcome to this evolving collection.

Transgender Lives: Your Stories (NYT). As part of a series of editorials about transgender experiences, we are featuring personal stories that reflect the strength, diversity and challenges of the community.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on May 4, 2015 - 2 comments

All the news that's fit to cat

nytimes.cat is one of the strangest sites I've seen in some time. I have no idea how these people got their cats wedged into their newspaper, or why.
posted by emelenjr on Apr 30, 2015 - 17 comments

“They were looking for a better life.”

Hundreds Feared Dead After Boat Filled With Migrants Capsizes in Mediterranean [New York Times]
"For the past several years, Europe has been confronted with hundreds of thousands of migrants arriving illegally from Africa and the Middle East, many of them fleeing war and poverty. Italy has been in the vanguard of rescue efforts, with its Navy and Coast Guard ships rescuing more than 130,000 people last year in a widely praised program known as Mare Nostrum."
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Apr 19, 2015 - 37 comments

“But Tibetan mastiffs are so 2013.”

Once-Prized Tibetan Mastiffs Are Discarded as Fad Ends in China [New York Times]
“Then there is the Tibetan mastiff, a lumbering shepherding dog native to the Himalayan highlands that was once the must-have accouterment for status-conscious Chinese. Four years ago, a reddish-brown purebred named Big Splash sold for $1.6 million, according to news reports, though cynics said the price was probably exaggerated for marketing purposes. No reasonable buyer, self-anointed experts said at the time, would pay more than $250,000 for a premium specimen.”
posted by Fizz on Apr 17, 2015 - 34 comments

When Is Cheryl’s Birthday?

How would you fare in a room full of adolescent math competitors in Singapore? [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 14, 2015 - 76 comments

“I’ve never had a vicious Angora.”

The Cuddly, Fluffy, Surreal World of Angora Show Bunnies [New York Times]
With beguiling beauty — and an arduous hair-care regimen — these rabbits compete to reach the height of perfection.
posted by Fizz on Apr 8, 2015 - 31 comments

“I’m not going to stop watering,”

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth [New York Times]
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.
California Water Use [New York Times] Are you affected? [New York Times] The Drought, explained. [New York Times Video] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 5, 2015 - 168 comments

Submitted for your approval

"Mad Men" and Its Love Affair With 60s Pop Culture “Nothing ended up in the show that wasn’t related to story.”
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Apr 3, 2015 - 45 comments

“They may be beneficial.”

Headgear Rule for Girls’ Lacrosse Ignites Outcry [New York Times]
Worried about the risk of serious head injuries in a sport where the players wield reinforced sticks and rifle shots with a hard, unyielding ball, Florida last month became the first state to require high school girls’ lacrosse teams to wear protective headgear.
posted by Fizz on Mar 31, 2015 - 80 comments

“Every person is a half-opened door leading to a room for everyone.”

Tomas Transtromer, Nobel-Winning Poet, Dies at 83 [New York Times] Previously.
posted by Fizz on Mar 29, 2015 - 13 comments

"Why is empathizing across groups so much more difficult?"

The Brain’s Empathy Gap: [New York Times]
Can mapping neural pathways help us make friends with our enemies?
posted by Fizz on Mar 21, 2015 - 4 comments

"She rolls her eyes."

Raising Teenagers: The Mother of All Problems by Rachel Cusk [New York Times]
Children are characters in the family story we tell — until, one day, they start telling it themselves.
posted by Fizz on Mar 20, 2015 - 59 comments

Jane Goodall's shadow

"In July 1960, Jane Goodall boarded a boat, and after a few hours motoring over the warm, deep waters of Lake Tanganyika, she stepped onto the pebbly beach at Gombe. Last summer, almost exactly 54 years later, Jane Goodall was standing on the same beach. The vast lake was still warm, the beach beneath her clear plastic sandals still pebbly. But nearly everything else in sight was different."
posted by ChuraChura on Mar 14, 2015 - 23 comments

“...characters arise out of our need for them.”

From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself by Marlon James [New York Times] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 10, 2015 - 5 comments

“I mean, would you hire a chef who never fried an egg?”

Cabbies’ Street Knowledge Takes Back Seat [New York Times]
New York cabbies have long had to face a rigorous set of geography questions on the test they must pass to get a license. Now those questions have disappeared.
Related: Who Needs a GPS? A New York Geography Quiz
posted by Fizz on Mar 9, 2015 - 29 comments

A Giant Picture of Snow Across the United States [New York Times]
These composite satellite images compare the snow cover in February of 2013, 2014 and 2015. This year, much of the Northeast, including the New York metropolitan area and New England, received more than a foot of extra snow than in an average February.
Each image is a composite of about 60 satellite pictures taken between Feb. 1 and March 5 of each year. Whiter areas indicate greater snow cover.
posted by Fizz on Mar 5, 2015 - 31 comments

Two Outcomes, Similar Paths

Two Outcomes, Similar Paths: Radical Muslim and Neo-Nazi. "Religious ideology plays a central role in the radicalization of young Muslim Europeans currently being lured to join the Islamic State or kill in the group’s name at home. But the psychological process underlying radicalization is remarkably universal, terrorism experts say." (previously)
posted by twirlip on Mar 5, 2015 - 30 comments

Bringing a Daughter Back From the Brink with Poems

The most optimistic people often struggle the hardest. They can’t quite square what’s going on in the world with their beliefs, and the disparity is alarming. [slnyt]
posted by ellieBOA on Feb 28, 2015 - 40 comments

"I love desolate landscapes."

My Saga, Part 1 By Karl Ove Knausgaard [New York Times] Following the trail of the first Europeans to set foot in America, the first of two parts. Previously. Previously. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 25, 2015 - 29 comments

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