507 posts tagged with Newyorktimes.
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Grilling with Lava [New York Times]
This July Fourth, we offer an intense, but minimalist way to grill steak. It requires 800 pounds of Wisconsin basaltic gravel heated to 2,000 degrees. New York Times food writers have advocated cooking directly on hot coals this Fourth of July, but the truly adventurous may want to consider another approach: lava-grilled steak. The Syracuse University professors Bob Wysocki and Jeff Karson, the leaders of this minimalist technique, say the key is to start with thin-cut steaks, the more marbled the better. You then find the nearest retrofitted bronze furnace. (Very likely, that is the one the professors have built for themselves in Syracuse as part of the university’s Lava Project. When not cooking dinner with it, Mr. Wysocki, an artist, and Mr. Karson, a geologist, create lava for scientific research and sculptures.)
[more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jul 3, 2015 - 19 comments

New York Times? Get a rope!

The New York Times suggests putting peas in your guacamole. Following up on a suggestion it made two years ago, the Times is offering a guacamole recipe from ABC Cocina in Union Square: a collaboration between the restaurant's chef-owner, Jean-Georges Vongerichten, and his chef de cuisine, Ian Coogan, that contains green peas. The suggestion has been met with dismay from guacamole-lovers around the country, including the President himself. But it's not a political issue: in Texas, for instance, Republicans and Democrats alike agree that the New York Times shouldn't mess with guacamole.
posted by immlass on Jul 1, 2015 - 144 comments

Minutes Matter

A Sea Change in Treating Heart Attacks (NYT) Dr. Mahesh Bikkina, the director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Paterson, N.J., tells his trainees about the old days: heart muscles that tore, with blood leaking out of holes, and valves that ruptured, leading to sudden death if not repaired immediately with open-heart surgery. “I tell them you will read about these things in textbooks,” Dr. Bikkina said.“You will almost never see them.”
posted by CrystalDave on Jun 21, 2015 - 14 comments

Displaced in the D.R.

The New York Times reports that the Dominican Republic will begin deporting thousands of undocumented migrant workers, most of them Haitian, later this week. The Washington Post provides historical context. In The Nation, Greg Grandin reports on the imminent event. Last week, he characterized the effort as "a vicious, anti-black pogrom.” In Harper’s, Rachel Nolan has a detailed letter from the Dominican Republic explaining the situation at length.
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Jun 16, 2015 - 15 comments

“Many atheists are still in the closet,”

Wanted: A Theology of Atheism by Molly Werthen [New York Times] [Op-Ed] What do people who don’t believe in God believe instead?
posted by Fizz on May 31, 2015 - 176 comments

Additional props are potato chips, pickles and olives

The New York Times has been around long enough to report on more or less everything, and its First Glimpses feature occasionally dives into the archives to see when some notable thing was mentioned for the very first time. This week, it's cheeseburgers. [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on May 27, 2015 - 37 comments

(⌒▽⌒)

When Birds Squawk, Other Species Seem to Listen by Christopher Solomon [New York Times]
A professor’s hunch is that birds are saying much more in warning of danger than previously suspected, and that other animals have evolved to understand the signals.

posted by Fizz on May 18, 2015 - 28 comments

Fake Diplomas, Real Cash: Pakistani Company Axact Reaps Millions

“We host one of the most renowned faculty in the world,” boasts a woman introduced in one promotional video as the head of a law school. “Come be a part of Newford University to soar the sky of excellence.”
Yet on closer examination, this picture shimmers like a mirage. The news reports are fabricated. The professors are paid actors. The university campuses exist only as stock photos on computer servers. The degrees have no true accreditation.
In fact, very little in this virtual academic realm, appearing to span at least 370 websites, is real — except for the tens of millions of dollars in estimated revenue it gleans each year from many thousands of people around the world, all paid to a secretive Pakistani software company.
Declan Walsh for The New York Times
posted by p3on on May 17, 2015 - 42 comments

“I turn right, toward Tokyo.”

In Flight [New York Times] [Interactive] En route from London to Tokyo, a pilot’s-eye view of life in the sky.
posted by Fizz on May 16, 2015 - 18 comments

Lards of the Flies

In China, Pigs Are Flying. Almost. [New York Times]
"With summer almost here, swine across China are jumping or being shoved off platforms and splashing into pools and ponds, where they bob around before paddling to shore."

posted by Fizz on May 8, 2015 - 8 comments

Ennui floods in.

I Don't Think David Brooks is Okay, You Guys Albert Burneko is worried about America's foremost thinkfluencer.
posted by emjaybee on May 8, 2015 - 95 comments

“I am worth less than a shoe,” she said.

The Price of Nice Nails; Or, Pay The Manicurist As if on cue, cavalcades of battered Ford Econoline vans grumble to the curbs, and the women jump in. It is the start of another workday for legions of New York City’s manicurists, who are hurtled to nail salons across three states. They will not return until late at night, after working 10- to 12-hour shifts, hunched over fingers and toes. [more inside]
posted by Major Matt Mason Dixon on May 7, 2015 - 134 comments

WHAT KIND OF HAT IS IT? I call it a fedora.

The Men of Condé Nast Photographed in Their Natural Habitat (New York Times)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 2, 2015 - 135 comments

Immediate Family

Sally Mann's Exposure An essay by Sally Mann about the publication, and subsequent reaction to, her second book of photographs, Immediate Family. [Many of the photographs featured naked images of her young children.]
posted by OmieWise on Apr 24, 2015 - 44 comments

“They were looking for a better life.”

Hundreds Feared Dead After Boat Filled With Migrants Capsizes in Mediterranean [New York Times]
"For the past several years, Europe has been confronted with hundreds of thousands of migrants arriving illegally from Africa and the Middle East, many of them fleeing war and poverty. Italy has been in the vanguard of rescue efforts, with its Navy and Coast Guard ships rescuing more than 130,000 people last year in a widely praised program known as Mare Nostrum."
[more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 19, 2015 - 37 comments

Automation is coming, but how will labor adapt?

The Machines Are Coming by Zeynep Tufekci
Machines are getting better than humans at figuring out who to hire, who’s in a mood to pay a little more for that sweater, and who needs a coupon to nudge them toward a sale. In applications around the world, software is being used to predict whether people are lying, how they feel and whom they’ll vote for. To crack these cognitive and emotional puzzles, computers needed not only sophisticated, efficient algorithms, but also vast amounts of human-generated data, which can now be easily harvested from our digitized world. The results are dazzling. Most of what we think of as expertise, knowledge and intuition is being deconstructed and recreated as an algorithmic competency, fueled by big data. But computers do not just replace humans in the workplace. They shift the balance of power even more in favor of employers. Our normal response to technological innovation that threatens jobs is to encourage workers to acquire more skills, or to trust that the nuances of the human mind or human attention will always be superior in crucial ways. But when machines of this capacity enter the equation, employers have even more leverage, and our standard response is not sufficient for the looming crisis.
[more inside]
posted by p3on on Apr 19, 2015 - 47 comments

“But Tibetan mastiffs are so 2013.”

Once-Prized Tibetan Mastiffs Are Discarded as Fad Ends in China [New York Times]
“Then there is the Tibetan mastiff, a lumbering shepherding dog native to the Himalayan highlands that was once the must-have accouterment for status-conscious Chinese. Four years ago, a reddish-brown purebred named Big Splash sold for $1.6 million, according to news reports, though cynics said the price was probably exaggerated for marketing purposes. No reasonable buyer, self-anointed experts said at the time, would pay more than $250,000 for a premium specimen.”

posted by Fizz on Apr 17, 2015 - 34 comments

'This propensity for tone-deaf stories about people of vast wealth'

Having trouble finding the right condo? Moving from colleting art to collecting passports? Feeling left behind in yacht purchases? Or are you having to budget your 500k a year? (previously) Or worried about pied-a-terre owners changing your neighborhood?
Or maybe the Times coverage of the super-rich is alienating millennials. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Apr 14, 2015 - 94 comments

“I’ve never had a vicious Angora.”

The Cuddly, Fluffy, Surreal World of Angora Show Bunnies [New York Times]
With beguiling beauty — and an arduous hair-care regimen — these rabbits compete to reach the height of perfection.

posted by Fizz on Apr 8, 2015 - 31 comments

“I’m not going to stop watering,”

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth [New York Times]
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.
California Water Use [New York Times] Are you affected? [New York Times] The Drought, explained. [New York Times Video] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 5, 2015 - 168 comments

“They may be beneficial.”

Headgear Rule for Girls’ Lacrosse Ignites Outcry [New York Times]
Worried about the risk of serious head injuries in a sport where the players wield reinforced sticks and rifle shots with a hard, unyielding ball, Florida last month became the first state to require high school girls’ lacrosse teams to wear protective headgear.

posted by Fizz on Mar 31, 2015 - 80 comments

“Every person is a half-opened door leading to a room for everyone.”

Tomas Transtromer, Nobel-Winning Poet, Dies at 83 [New York Times] Previously.
posted by Fizz on Mar 29, 2015 - 13 comments

A Clean Version of Hell

Inside America's Toughest Federal Prison For years, conditions inside the United States’ only federal supermax facility were largely a mystery. But a landmark lawsuit is finally revealing the harsh world within. (SLNYT)
posted by box on Mar 26, 2015 - 61 comments

Communicate affordably with imprisoned loved ones

Pigeon.ly has joined Y-Combinator's 2015 Winter class. While in prison, founder Frederick Hutson was amazed by the cost and difficulty of communicating with those outside. When he was released in 2011, he founded Pigeon.ly (originally Picturegram) to help people send pictures (and, later, make phone calls) to inmates. Additional coverage: The New York Times (2013), Forbes (2014), Planet Money.
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 25, 2015 - 31 comments

Together Always, in Darkness and in Light

There is no good way to tell a new guy in your life that you’re going blind.
posted by josher71 on Mar 20, 2015 - 17 comments

"She rolls her eyes."

Raising Teenagers: The Mother of All Problems by Rachel Cusk [New York Times]
Children are characters in the family story we tell — until, one day, they start telling it themselves.

posted by Fizz on Mar 20, 2015 - 59 comments

Roads? Where We're Going, We Don't Need Roads.

The Obama administration is investigating allegations that two senior Secret Service agents, including a top member of the president’s protective detail, drove a government car into White House security barricades after drinking at a late-night party last week, an agency official said Wednesday.
House Oversight Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz told CNN that his initial understanding is that the two agents were "partying in Georgetown" when they responded to an incident at the White House. Mr. Chaffetz added: “It’s never good to be drunk at work, especially if you are in the Secret Service.”
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 11, 2015 - 47 comments

“...characters arise out of our need for them.”

From Jamaica to Minnesota to Myself by Marlon James [New York Times] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 10, 2015 - 5 comments

“I mean, would you hire a chef who never fried an egg?”

Cabbies’ Street Knowledge Takes Back Seat [New York Times]
New York cabbies have long had to face a rigorous set of geography questions on the test they must pass to get a license. Now those questions have disappeared.
Related: Who Needs a GPS? A New York Geography Quiz
posted by Fizz on Mar 9, 2015 - 29 comments

A Giant Picture of Snow Across the United States [New York Times]
These composite satellite images compare the snow cover in February of 2013, 2014 and 2015. This year, much of the Northeast, including the New York metropolitan area and New England, received more than a foot of extra snow than in an average February.
Each image is a composite of about 60 satellite pictures taken between Feb. 1 and March 5 of each year. Whiter areas indicate greater snow cover.
posted by Fizz on Mar 5, 2015 - 31 comments

"‘You have to have some stuff to do,’ she said (she didn’t say ‘stuff’)"

Fit to Print documents the ways in which the New York Times writes around expletives even as it is often drawn to the very words it deems unprintable.
posted by Elementary Penguin on Mar 5, 2015 - 16 comments

Bringing a Daughter Back From the Brink with Poems

The most optimistic people often struggle the hardest. They can’t quite square what’s going on in the world with their beliefs, and the disparity is alarming. [slnyt]
posted by ellieBOA on Feb 28, 2015 - 40 comments

Is it an art gallery? A plantation tour? A museum?

Building the First Slavery Museum in America - David Amsden, The New York Times
"From their weathered cypress frames, a dusty path, lined with hulking iron kettles that were used by slaves to boil sugar cane, leads to a grassy clearing dominated by a slave jail — an approach designed so that a visitor’s most memorable glimpse of the white shutters and stately columns of the property’s 220-year-old 'Big House' will come through the rusted bars of the squat, rectangular cell. A number of memorials also dot the grounds, including a series of angled granite walls engraved with the names of the 107,000 slaves who spent their lives in Louisiana before 1820. Inspired by Maya Lin’s Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, the memorial lists the names nonalphabetically to mirror the confusion and chaos that defined a slave’s life."
[more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Feb 27, 2015 - 21 comments

"I love desolate landscapes."

My Saga, Part 1 By Karl Ove Knausgaard [New York Times] Following the trail of the first Europeans to set foot in America, the first of two parts. Previously. Previously. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 25, 2015 - 29 comments

Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant on Women Doing ‘Office Housework’

"A man who doesn’t help is 'busy'; a woman is 'selfish'." Regardless of your opinion of the advice Sheryl Sandberg gives to women in this article, it has some interesting (and disheartening) statistics about how the majority of "office housework" is expected to fall to women:
In a study led by the New York University psychologist Madeline Heilman, participants evaluated the performance of a male or female employee who did or did not stay late to help colleagues prepare for an important meeting. For staying late and helping, a man was rated 14 percent more favorably than a woman. When both declined, a woman was rated 12 percent lower than a man. Over and over, after giving identical help, a man was significantly more likely to be recommended for promotions, important projects, raises and bonuses. A woman had to help just to get the same rating as a man who didn’t help ... When men do help, they are more likely to do so in public, while women help more behind the scenes. Studies demonstrate that men are more likely to contribute with visible behaviors — like showing up at optional meetings — while women engage more privately in time-consuming activities like assisting others and mentoring colleagues. As the Simmons College management professor Joyce K. Fletcher noted, women’s communal contributions tend simply to “disappear.”

posted by Librarypt on Feb 7, 2015 - 81 comments

Bulbs dim. Fans slow. Once, my air-conditioner caught on fire.

Lights Out in Nigeria by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie [New York Times]
"LAGOS, Nigeria — WE call it light; “electricity” is too sterile a word, and “power” too stiff, for this Nigerian phenomenon that can buoy spirits and smother dreams. Whenever I have been away from home for a while, my first question upon returning is always: “How has light been?” The response, from my gateman, comes in mournful degrees of a head shake. Bad. Very bad.
Previously.
posted by Fizz on Feb 1, 2015 - 5 comments

“And all of a sudden, it’s a homicide.”

A Twist in the Murder of a 97-Year-Old Man: He Was Knifed 5 Decades Ago: [New York Times]
The New York medical examiner determined that an operation after a stabbing in the 1950s led to Antonio Ciccarello’s death in September at 97. The police have opened a murder investigation.

posted by Fizz on Jan 25, 2015 - 23 comments

"A fetishized nostalgia for the 1970s and early '80s"

​​​​They Say Art Is Dead in New York. They're Wrong. – Alan Feuer, NYT ​(December 2014):
Somehow, in the last few years, it has become an article of faith that New York has lost its artistic spirit, that the city's long run as a capital of culture is over. After all (or so the argument goes), foreign oligarchs and hedge-fund traders have bought up all the real estate, chased away the artists and turned the bohemia that once ran east from Chumley's clear across the Williamsburg Bridge into a soulless playground of money.

Last year, the foremost proponent of this doomsday theory was the rock star David Byrne, who complained in The Guardian that artists, as a species, had been priced out of New York. This year, others joined him. The novelist Zadie Smith lamented in October, in The New York Review of Books, that the city's avant-garde had all but disappeared. The musician Moby wrote a comparable essay in February, describing how creative types are fleeing New York and referring to his former home, accurately but narrowly, as "the city of money." Just a couple of weeks ago, Robert Elmes, the founder of the Galápagos Art Space in Brooklyn, declared the indigenous "creative ecosystem" was in crisis — so, naturally, he was moving to Detroit.

posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 17, 2015 - 64 comments

"It’s hard to stay away from religion when you mess with acid."

Robert Stone, Novelist of the Vietnam Era and Beyond, Dies at 77 [New York Times]
"Robert Stone, who wrote ambitious, award-winning novels about errant Americans in dangerous circumstances or on existential quests — or both — as commentary on an unruly, wayward nation in the Vietnam era and beyond, died on Saturday at his home in Key West, Fla. He was 77.
[more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jan 12, 2015 - 17 comments

"Writers are always selling somebody out."

Céline Unveils Its Latest Poster Girl: Joan Didion [New York Times]
“I don’t have any clue,” said the 80-year-old author of well-thumbed classics such as “The White Album,” “Slouching Towards Bethlehem” and “The Year of Magical Thinking,” reached by telephone on Wednesday at her Upper East Side residence (where the photo, by Juergen Teller, was taken). “I have no idea.” Whose idea was this? “They got in touch with me,” Ms. Didion said, as crisp as one of Phoebe Philo’s cotton tunics."
[The Céline ad featuring Joan Didion.] [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jan 8, 2015 - 17 comments

Wreck of the Kulluk

Wreck of the Kulluk (SLNYT) Three years ago, Shell spent millions to send a colossal oil rig to drill in the remote seas of the Arctic. But the Arctic had other plans. [more inside]
posted by CrystalDave on Jan 1, 2015 - 74 comments

How close are you willing to get?

2014: The Year in Pictures. [SLNYT]
posted by skycrashesdown on Dec 25, 2014 - 24 comments

It takes him five beers.

Poynter's List of the Best (and Worst) Corrections, Retractions and Apologies in Media in 2014 Previously. Previouslier.
posted by Navelgazer on Dec 20, 2014 - 26 comments

"On the third day of the iguana plague..."

The Iguana in the Bathtub by Anne Doten [New York Times] Hard lessons on a cold day in Florida.
"When the temperature dipped below 40, iguanas started falling from the trees. Small, sleek green iguanas; big iguanas as long as four feet from snout to tail, scales cresting gloriously from their heads; orange-and-green iguanas, their muscled, goose-pimpled arms resolving into sharp claws. Iguanas were everywhere: in the bushy areas surrounding canals, on sidewalks, in backyards, lying helpless among the fallen, rotting fruit of mango and orange trees."

posted by Fizz on Nov 30, 2014 - 19 comments

How likely is it that birth control could let you down?

The NYT calculates the probability of pregnancy using 15 common birth control methods, for up to 10 years of both "typical" and "perfect" use. Protip: the graphs do slidey comparison things on mouseover!
posted by Ragini on Nov 26, 2014 - 55 comments

It pretty much landed in my lap

I’ve been watching Odell Beckham practice similar one-handed catches for the past several weeks. He caught half a dozen in practice before Sunday’s game, and had an amazing one-handed fingertip catch in practice several weeks ago. So he was definitely on my radar screen. Today I was making a point of keeping track of where Beckham lined up, so I would be ready. -- The New York Times interviews photographers about how they themselves caught this incredible catch in the Giants game last night.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Nov 24, 2014 - 43 comments

The History Of The New York Times' Style Section

"Despite its youth, the section has a much longer history, one that encompasses the long effort of women in journalism to be taken seriously as reporters and as readers, the development of New Journalism, large-scale social changes that have brought gay culture into the mainstream, shifts in the way news is delivered and consumed, and economic consolidations and disruptions that the section has, sometimes in spite of itself, thoroughly documented and cataloged. The Styles section may well be pretty stupid sometimes. It’s also a richer and more complex entity than any of us would like to believe." - Bonfire Of The Inanities - Jacqui Shine writes a long, detailed history of the New York Times Style Section.
posted by The Whelk on Nov 14, 2014 - 25 comments

"A sure sign of a good book is that you like it more the older you get."

First editions, second thoughts: [New York Times] "On December 2, Christie's will auction 75 first-edition books, each of which is a unique object that has been annotated with words and/or illustrations by its author. Proceeds from the auction will benefit PEN American Center."
posted by Fizz on Nov 6, 2014 - 6 comments

"Do We Need a Law Against Catcalling?"

A New York Times Op-Ed debates the need for a "Law Against Catcalling." [more inside]
posted by ourt on Nov 3, 2014 - 144 comments

"The way they control human beings, like cattle."

"If you don't know your own value, somebody will tell you your value, and it'll be less than you're worth." In a brutal and unforgiving vocation, forty-nine year old Bernard Hopkins is the oldest fighter in the history of professional boxing to win and defend a world title. Hopkins has developed his own particular worldview over the course of a rough life and he doesn't mind sharing some of his opinions, one of which, as Carlo Rotella notes, is "He's not shy about pointing out that both private and public interests invest heavily in the social failure of black men." Why has Hopkins lasted over twenty-five years in his fight career and what do his opponents in the ring fear most? It's his mind. (NYT)
posted by cwest on Nov 1, 2014 - 6 comments

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