321 posts tagged with Nostalgia.
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Leon Bridges: like that 60's rhythm and blues sound never left

Taking on the dreamy, compelling sound of the lost soul decades is a damn high bar to set for yourself. Soul revivalists usually don’t get very far in my book, because what’s the point of competing with the likes of Sam Cooke and Otis Redding? Listening to Leon Bridges made me do a 180 on that stance. See, if you actually can hold a candle to legends like Cooke and Redding — and Bridges can — then there’s no reason not to indulge in some nostalgia.
NPR has a first listen of Coming Home, Bridges' debut album, and you can see and hear plenty more of him on YouTube, from a live cover of Cooke's "Nothing Can Change This Love" to a solo performance of "Lisa Sawyer," a reflective song about his mother. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 17, 2015 - 6 comments

The Best Footballer You Never Saw

What did he do in Mark Lawrenson's kitbag ? Ian McIntosh of the Guardian's on-hiatus "Football Weekly" tells the evocative tale of proto-70's legend Robin Friday, soccer's first rock star. (SLGrauniad audio - NFSW)
posted by devious truculent and unreliable on Jun 15, 2015 - 3 comments

As a fable it’s incoherent.

"Why so Poky? The scourge of terrible canonical children’s books." by Gabriel Roth, Slate
Reading to one’s children is, as everyone knows, one of the great pleasures of parenthood. I love the creaturely warmth of my daughter snuggled up close and the feeling of giving her something intrinsically human and necessary. And Eliza loves being read to. She enjoys the stories and the pictures, but more than that, I think, she responds to the mental intimacy: the knowledge that she and I are looking at the same pages and interpreting the same sentences. It’s a balm for the terrible isolation that arrives around age 2, along with language and self-consciousness—the knowledge that one’s experience is inescapably private. And so the time I spend reading to her can feel, for both of us, like communion.
[more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 3, 2015 - 42 comments

Don't think. Just shoot.

Lomography is style of pop photography based around the quirky cameras by the Austrian camera manufacturer known as Lomo. There are several camera types that fall under the lomography genre. Among some of the more popular, are the Diana and Holga. These cameras, and (all of them in the Lomo line) are usually poor technical cameras. They are "poorly" built and often have light leaks, poor alignment of their lenses or other defects. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 21, 2015 - 55 comments

the most emotionally affecting music is what was popular when I was 13

25 One-Hit Wonders From The '90s & Early 2000s You Totally Forgot Existed [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 20, 2015 - 245 comments

well-written instruction manual & large, folded color map 🌏

"Some games make an enormous impact on you when you play them, and time and technology do little to diminish that impact. I feel that way about quite a few games: Elite, Super Mario Bros, and The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time are three that immediately come to mind. Secret of Mana is without question a fourth." [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 11, 2015 - 69 comments

A grown-ass man replays Final Fantasy VII

A grown-ass man replays Final Fantasy VII. The unfortunate part about replaying Final Fantasy VII is realizing that it is terrible. I mean, not terrible terrible, but it’s bad the way, say, a very old sci-fi movie is bad. It is enjoyable exclusively with mountains of qualifiers, with context and air-quotes and, preferably, your own reminiscences filling it in, making its absurdities lovable.
posted by tybeet on Feb 25, 2015 - 194 comments

RIP Joe Franklin

He held the world record for the longest-running talk show in history, interviewing everyone from notables to nobodies from 1950 to 1993, continuing to work on NYC radio up until his death. He was an early advocate of film preservation and got his start selling jokes to the likes of Eddie Cantor and Al Jolson.

Joe Franklin has died at age 88. [more inside]
posted by dr_dank on Jan 31, 2015 - 22 comments

Why you should stop relying on your phone, and buy a nice camera

Like beer and pop music, it was easy to make do with what’s cheap and available, only to look back on a life of Dave Matthews and Bud Light and wonder why I’d gotten by on “good enough.” Because I am aging, and because I have the memory of the original Tamagotchi, I am profoundly grateful to have these clear, high-resolution photos of the people I loved and love. [more inside]
posted by craniac on Jan 26, 2015 - 125 comments

It's enough to make you want to stop teaching kids poetry.

In which we discuss our most failed romantic gestures.
posted by Navelgazer on Jan 21, 2015 - 100 comments

She's out back counting stars

38 Great Alt-Rock Songs You Haven't Thought About in 20 Years. (SLbuzzfeed) [more inside]
posted by misskaz on Jan 17, 2015 - 162 comments

From Churchill to Doctor Who

Royal Mail 'special stamps' have been produced in the UK for fifty years since 1965, when the new postmaster general, Tony Benn, expanded the criteria for commemorative stamps to include representations of British life and culture.
posted by carter on Jan 4, 2015 - 12 comments

All these Yahoo Directory listings will be lost, like tears in the rain

Search Engine Land (December 27, 2014): "The Yahoo Directory, the core part of how Yahoo itself began in 1994, officially closed today, five days ahead of when Yahoo had said the end would come." The Internet Archive save of Yahoo for October 1996. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Dec 29, 2014 - 75 comments

"So, yes, this is Bride of Frankenstein with Christmas characters."

"Rankin/Bass made 18 specials, of varying length and ambition, between 1964 and 1985. Nearly all of these films revolve around the performance of some Christmas song or another. Nearly all of them deal with the crippling scars of childhood shame. And nearly all of them are completely off the rails insane." Vox's Todd VanDerWerff watches, and ranks, all 18 Rankin/Bass Christmas Specials.
posted by We had a deal, Kyle on Dec 24, 2014 - 31 comments

VCR Games: you just became the Luke Skywalker of the new Star Wars.

"With Christmas not far away, you may start seeing ads for video games that try to marry the VCR with traditional board games. Unhappily, that marriage more often resembles the bickering Lockhorns than the mild-mannered Nelsons. Here's a look at three of the games now out in 1986." But that's only a snapshot of the dynamic world of VCR board games, which peaked in the early 1990s with the Atmosfear series, known as Nightmare in Australia, where the game series was a huge cross-media empire, bigger than "Crocodile" Dundee. Another significant game was Star Wars: The Interactive Video Board Game, if for no other reason that it is canon and expands the story of the second Death Star. There are less than 100 VCR board games, and the videos for many of them are currently online, with more game documents and details on Board Game Geeks. By the end of the 1990s, the VCR was on the way out, replaced by DVD board games. Let's browse the isles of toy stores past, thanks to the crowd-sourced nostalgia that is the internet. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 28, 2014 - 38 comments

A tale of music and memory unspooled through a schoolgirl's mixtape

Groove Is in the Heart celebrates the ritual of recording a compilation tape in the days before the infinite jukebox of the internet. [5-minute Guardian microplay] [more inside]
posted by DarlingBri on Nov 21, 2014 - 40 comments

A dose of audio nostalgia for early netizens: much of IUMA, back online

"If you want to hear music, you know what you do - you turn on the radio, put on a CD, or even go to a concert. But as the age of the info superhighway inches forward, you can even get music from your own home computer." That's the intro to a short CNN segment on IUMA, the Internet Underground Music Archive, which opened in 1992 as an effort for unsigned bands to share their music on the world-wide web, for free. Unfortunately, it fell the way of many early 1990s online entities: it was bought out, then the new owners couldn't keep up with changing times, and the site went dark. Except before IUMA disappeared, John Gilmore grabbed much of the material and backed it up on tapes, and turned to (MeFi's Own) Jason Scott and Archive.org to bring back IUMA. They did, and you can now browse through over 45,000 bands and artists, and more than 680,000 tracks of music.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 10, 2014 - 36 comments

If you're going to make enemies...

Cannon Films Presents: Captain America: The Winter Soldier [via] [more inside]
posted by brundlefly on Nov 6, 2014 - 26 comments

That New Costume Smell

If you were a child in the 70s who dreamed of being Boss Hogg or an 80s baby desperate to be a Rubik’s Cube, your dream could come true for less than $5. For that was the Golden Age of Ben Cooper and Collegeville Costume. Relive their glory days by perusing some vintage catalogs. [more inside]
posted by jrossi4r on Oct 23, 2014 - 61 comments

Comics from Flynn Gleason: Zombie Apawcalypse and George and his Pencil

If you're looking for a zombie webcomics with a bit of gore and a lot of kitties, you may enjoy Flynn Gleason's Zombie Apawcalypse. Flynn's work may be vaguely familiar to you if you remember a Calvin and Hobbes type comic from the mid- to late-1990s, called George and his Pencil, with archived comics still in their rough pencil-drawn form. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Oct 17, 2014 - 1 comment

tv intro party

Has your day been woefully free of potentially irritating nostalgic sitcom earworms? Worry no more, because they're all here, just waiting for you to press play. [more inside]
posted by poffin boffin on Oct 3, 2014 - 60 comments

Cinderhella Lives!

In 2004 Joseph Kahn directed the hyper-kinetic, poorly reviewed motorcycle action movie Torque. It was Kahn's directorial debut, and though he was tapped for (one of many) failed Neuromancer adaptations, he devoted the next six years to a largely self financed project: the horror-comedy farce Detention. Noted cultural critic Steven Shaviro discusses in this essay why Detention, despite also being reviewed negatively, is one of his favorite movies of the decade. Shaviro's review contains major spoilers for the plot, and it's probably best to go into the movie blind. A brief non-spoiler synopsis is available below the jump. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Sep 15, 2014 - 25 comments

15 years after we lost the moon...

With Saturday being the 15th anniversary of the tragic departure of the Moon from Earth orbit, it's a good time to visit The Boneyard, home to all the disassembled remains of the Eagles used in the Space 1999 series. [more inside]
posted by happyroach on Sep 14, 2014 - 32 comments

Oyl int Ruwad

In the 1960s, the city of Sheffield redeveloped their neglected market square into a Hole in the Road. "A small early forerunner to Meadowhall-type malls; but with more drunks and dodgy smells," the Hole was filled in and paved over in the 90s. [more inside]
posted by moonmilk on Sep 14, 2014 - 19 comments

Mullahs were at mosques, teachers were in shcools...

Many of you Americans will be familiar with that certain kind of pop/country song that looks back on the good old days of yesteryear, those carefree, reckless days of mythical youth: driving Camaros, drinking Boone's Farm wine, singing the hit songs of the day, and, yeah, all that. Well, here's a song that springs from that same place in the heart, but in an Afghani version, and a wee bit more political in its message, here and there, than the American versions: it's Farhad Darya's Oo Ghaitaa, translated as "Those Were the Days".
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 7, 2014 - 13 comments

Damn video rental outlets and cheese stores selling Argentine parmesan!

Has your neighborhood become 'upscale'? Take a San Francisco gentrification quiz from 1985 and find out. In 1985, the San Francisco Chronicle ran a tongue-in-cheek quiz allowing readers to see if their neighborhood had turned upscale. It's interesting to see how many of these types of business no longer exist (travel agencies!) and to think about what some of the others have morphed into almost three decades later.
posted by Blue Meanie on Aug 18, 2014 - 65 comments

The raygun Gothic future which never came still exists for me

But in addition to our retreat into wishfulness, something else was brewing: a sense that the past was not only better than the present, but that the past’s predictions for the future were also better than what had actually become the present. No longer content to live in (or through) our memories of the past, we also yearned to live in the past’s vision of the future. We were nostalgic for yesterday’s prognostications: You could say that we succumbed to prognostalgia. Living with our backs to the future, on the cultural fixation with past dreams of the future, on the 50th anniversary of Isaac Asimov's write-up on the 1964 World's Fair, which is still being reviewing to track Asimov's hits and misses [via mefi projects] [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 16, 2014 - 15 comments

"An awfully classy hook"

The Wonder Years. An Oral History.
posted by zarq on Aug 8, 2014 - 21 comments

U Remind Me of a Year That I Once Knew...

Throwing a theme party? Need some background music whilst checking out your ex's facebook pics? Do you pine for times gone by? Step into the Nostalgia Machine!
posted by stinkfoot on Jul 23, 2014 - 104 comments

Iron Horses

Iron, Steam and Coal. Photographer Matthew Malkiewicz captures the timeless beauty of the steam locomotive and steam trains - the steam, the tracks, the folks who run them and just the folks who love them. (Via Petapixel)
posted by caddis on Jul 22, 2014 - 4 comments

Traction Park, redux

The World's Most Dangerous Amusement Park Opens Its Gates Again: (Class) Action Park, perennial MetaFilter favorite, is back in business! [more inside]
posted by flex on Jul 8, 2014 - 56 comments

"She had led them into and out of some mighty thrilling episodes."

“Would you like to – solve mysteries? belong to a secret club? ride, swim, travel, go to parties with the best friends in the world? Then the wonderful adventures of Trixie Belden are written just for you. Don’t miss a single one!” [more inside]
posted by szechuan on Jul 2, 2014 - 26 comments

Learning languages with Muzzy, the clock-eating fuzzy alien

“Je Suis La Jeune Fille.” “Yes, that’s French they’re speaking. But no, these children aren’t French – they’re American!” If you grew up in the late 1980s and early 1990s, or watched children's TV programming from that era in the US or UK, no doubt you saw that commercial for Muzzy (formally titled Muzzy in Gondoland). The show was first produced by the BBC in 1986 to teach English as a second language, as seen in this playlist of five videos, and later expanded with Muzzy Comes Back in 1989 (six episode playlist). The shows were both translated in to French, German (playlist), Spanish (and the Spanish vocabulary builder), and Italian (Muzzy in Gondoland, Muzzy Comes Back).
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 28, 2014 - 32 comments

And together, THEY FIGHT CRIME!

During the late 1970's and 1980's, Glen A. Larson's lighthearted television dramas were incredibly popular: Knight Rider. B.J. and the Bear. The original Battlestar Galactica. Quincy M.E. The Fall Guy. Magnum, P.I. Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Larson had hit after hit and it seemed he could do no wrong. But he did produce three flops in the 80's, (and another in the 90's that managed to last two seasons): Automan, The Highwayman, Manimal and Night Man. [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 16, 2014 - 138 comments

The Prodigy, still raving after 20 years

Twenty years after originally forming, the English electronic/ rave/ big beat group The Prodigy were back on tour for their fifth studio album, Invaders Must Die. On July 24, 2010, the "40-somethings bounce around a stage like men half their age, owning festival-sized audiences" like rising dance stars wish they could. The performance was recorded and released the next year, and you can see the hour plus of World's On Fire in full on Vimeo. (NOTE: NSFW lyrics) [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 29, 2014 - 67 comments

Brushed chrome details and a shag carrying case.

ALT/1977 is a series of advertising mock-ups which imagines modern products with the aesthetics and production of 1970s consumer electronics. Faux-wood paneling, angular fonts, and more orange than you can shake a stick at.
posted by codacorolla on Apr 17, 2014 - 60 comments

Ever wanted to be Cary Grant in North by Northwest? Now you can.

Pullman rail cars: A detour back through time [more inside]
posted by valkane on Apr 13, 2014 - 27 comments

Reviving the Scarab of Ra

Rick Holzgrafe's Scarab of Ra is one of those early Macintosh shareware games that nostalgic players really really wish would be updated for OSX. Would you settle for a javascript version? The key commands and interface are a bit different, but the monkey will still steal your lantern and you can still earn academic credit by banking the gold you find, exploring the mazes, and collecting treasure. Just like real life. [more inside]
posted by julen on Apr 9, 2014 - 22 comments

Geek Love at 25

"Geek Love touched a nerve at the beginning of the ’90s, as grunge rock poured from the Pacific Northwest and independent movies like Reservoir Dogs (1992), Clerks (1994), Kids (1995), and Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995) flourished. In the same way that punk and grunge felt real—not like slick stadium rock, big-budget studio movies, hokey scripted TV—Geek Love achieved a fresh kind of authenticity. The Binewskis felt real, even as their lives and their story were fantastical. There was something about the idea of a freak show, an entertainment that hadn’t thrived in American culture for generations, which felt just right in the early ’90s."
posted by R. Schlock on Mar 8, 2014 - 27 comments

On Not Going Home

On Not Going Home "Logically, a refusal to go home should validate, negatively, the very idea of home, rather in the way that Said’s idea of exile validates the idea of an original ‘true home’. But perhaps the refusal to go home is consequent on the loss, or lack, of home: as if those fortunate expatriates were really saying to me: ‘I couldn’t go back home because I wouldn’t know how to anymore.’ And there is ‘Home’ and ‘a home’. "
posted by dhruva on Feb 18, 2014 - 14 comments

I still kind of want the mailman pants.

It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. Dawson's Creek was on TV, No Doubt was on the radio, and teenage girls across America wanted every single thing in the dELiA*s catalog. Going on 20 years later, those girls are women. Women with scanners and style websites. Women who remember. [more inside]
posted by Sara C. on Jan 21, 2014 - 130 comments

Once upon a time a junkman had a dream, a dream of salvaging.. the moon!

In January of 1979, ABC premiered a made-for-TV movie called Salvage, featuring Harry Broderick (Andy Griffith) as "the junkman with a dream," which he stated simply: "I want to build a ship, fly to the moon, salvage all the NASA stuff up there, bring it back to the earth, and sell it." His crazy idea isn't so crazy, thanks to the assistance of former astronaut Skip Carmichael (Joel Higgins) and fuel/tech expert Melanie Slozar (Trish Stewart). They managed to build their spaceship and get to the moon and back, thanks to Carmichael's ingenious "Trans-Linear Vector Principle." The movie did so well that the crew's adventures were extended into a total of 18 episodes, split into two seasons. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jan 18, 2014 - 38 comments

Stinkor. The He-Man Canonical villan who still stinks

Almost 30 years after original sale, some 80's toys are sought after for their less than pleasant odour. If you can get hold of one today, you'll discover that the He-Man villains Stinkor and Moss Man still cling to their particular [pungent] aroma. [more inside]
posted by Faintdreams on Jan 14, 2014 - 68 comments

Chino Otsuka's Imagine Finding Me

Chino Otsuka uses photography and video to explore the fluid relationship between the memory, time and photography. Her series Imagine Finding Me consists of double self-portraits, with images of her present self beside her past self in various places she has visited. (via)
posted by dng on Jan 10, 2014 - 5 comments

This post courtesy of the little green guys and the red jammies

♪ "Believe it or not, I'm walkin on air.
I never thought I could feel so free....
Flying away on a wing and a prayer,
Who could it be?
Believe it or not, it's just me."
[more inside]
posted by zarq on Jan 7, 2014 - 88 comments

Would you believe...

What do you need to be an international CONTROL super spy fighting the forces of KAOS? A Shoe-Phone. A Cone of Silence. A Bulletproof Invisible Wall and a Laser Blazer. Then, and only then, can you Get Smart. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 16, 2013 - 52 comments

Like a joke you know is coming but still surprises you

Will we be able to forget things long enough to remember them again? Nostalgia Confuses Me
posted by sacrifix on Nov 20, 2013 - 19 comments

Interview with Robert Dennis, composer for 1970s Sesame Street segments

"Milk" is one of the most strange and powerful episodes to come out of the Children's Television Workshop. It is impossible to imagine this film being made now. Here's the pitch:
Yeah… Jim. Look, I thought we would show how milk gets made with no script and no dialogue. Yeah. Let's just go shoot footage of farmers and the milk truck, maybe throw in a crying baby and some weird, monotone music crafted by some composer who likes jazzy stuff played by a chamber ensemble. Sunny day? Nah. Let's not make it cheerful or happy. We should make it gloomy and unsettling. Oh, and Jim? To do it right, we need some crane shots, a huge decal for the truck, and about four and a half minutes running time.
Read on, for an interview with Robert Dennis, composer of Milk and other clips (including Cow Feeding and the Mad Painter series of shorts).
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 15, 2013 - 118 comments

Privilege signs are fading away

New York’s ever-changing streetscape usually transforms at a pace too slow to be discerned. All appears as it was the day before, until the day comes when you realize how long it has been since you’ve seen...a privilege sign.
posted by Chrysostom on Oct 16, 2013 - 36 comments

Which Is Creepier: Mom's Costume, or the One In the Box From the Store?

Josh Clark from the Stuff You Should Know Podcast, has put together two amazing galleries of old Halloween costumes. Really old, homemade costumes, and Seventies and Eighties costumes.
posted by Toekneesan on Oct 10, 2013 - 49 comments

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