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Lady Di and Dodi demise film, "Unlawful Killing"

Lawyers allegedly demanded 87 cuts to Keith Allen's film - about the death of Lady Diana, Dodi and Henry Paul - before it could be broadcast. So online - and specifically - here is probably the only place where you will get to see it. "Unlawful Killing" deals with the incident and the subsequent Operation Paget investigation in 2008. It alleges a good deal of foul play. [more inside]
posted by rongorongo on Jan 20, 2015 - 33 comments

I bring you a Pankaj Mishra longread in The Guardian

After the Paris attacks: It’s time for a new Enlightenment We must move past the tired debate that pits the modern west against its backward other and recover the Enlightenment ideal of rigorous self-criticism
posted by infini on Jan 20, 2015 - 25 comments

Lose yourself

Dérive is a smartphone app inspired by the Situationists that encourages you to wander your city. You can use the general deck, use one for Abu Dhabi, Biella, Ithaca, Johannesburg, Kampala, New York City, Paris or San Francisco, or make your own
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 19, 2014 - 16 comments

'smile regimes'

Incorruptible Teeth, or, the French Smile Revolution
In 1787, Madame Vigée-Lebrun, painter to France’s royal and aristocratic elite, displayed a canvas at the Paris Salon. It was a self-portrait depicting the artist in an affectionate embrace with her daughter. Vigée-Lebrun is smiling—a sweet, broad smile revealing white teeth. There is little about this pose that seems in any way exceptional, yet exception was furiously taken. “An affectation which artists, art-lovers and persons of taste have been united in condemning,” wrote an anonymous commentator, “and which finds no precedent amongst the Ancients, is that in smiling she shows her teeth. This affectation is particularly out of place in a mother.”

How the smile came to Paris (briefly), aka Grin City. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 14, 2014 - 21 comments

The problem is you've never actually known what the question is

The school in Auckland with a radical 'no rules' policy (12:00; 2014) [via] has a little in common with the school in Framingham with a radical 'no curriculum' policy (9:13; 2009) [previously], which has a little in common with the self-directed IT school in Paris for ages 18 to 30 (2:13; 2014), which takes some inspiration from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (excerpt, 12:24; 1981).
posted by Monsieur Caution on Nov 29, 2014 - 19 comments

The Tiger of Paris

In the year 1450, a pack of man-eating wolves invaded Paris. Dozen of Parisians died, until the people lured the wolves into the Île de la Cité and stoned them to death. This year, a new beast was sighted prowling the suburbs of Paris. Was it a tiger? Or was it something else?
posted by mbrubeck on Nov 15, 2014 - 58 comments

Objecticide

Murdering street furniture is just one of the projects of French artist Lor-K.
posted by Omnomnom on Nov 6, 2014 - 10 comments

"Provocative" Christmas tree rasing eyebrows in Paris

A green, curiously-shaped object has been erected in a Paris square
posted by Nevin on Oct 17, 2014 - 76 comments

I live in a constant state of unrest while I am here

Do you miss Paris? [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 23, 2014 - 17 comments

He should live and sleep in front of a mirror.

Rose Callahan photographs the colorful and intricate styles of the modern Dandy.
posted by The Whelk on Sep 5, 2014 - 78 comments

" They were paying for an experience. "

Behind Claude’s Doors
In 1960s Paris she became known as the world’s most exclusive madam, whose client list was said to include John Kennedy, de Gaulle, Onassis, and multiple Rothschilds, and whose beautiful and cultivated girls often went on to marry wealth, power, and prestige. But among the many secrets Madame Claude kept, perhaps the greatest were her own. William Stadiem, who knew the elusive Claude in the 1980s, follows her trail to the South of France.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 22, 2014 - 14 comments

70ème anniversaire de la libération de Paris

50 photos de la Libération de Paris se fondent dans le présent. [Via] [more inside]
posted by homunculus on Jun 6, 2014 - 16 comments

15 potential headquarters for the Illuminati: theories and conspiracies

The Complex City Guide has a bit of information on 15 possible headquarters for the Illuminati, but it's a slideshow with limited information, and there's a lot of information out there, so let's get into it. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on May 26, 2014 - 74 comments

Happy Mother's Day

Moments of the Human Condition, a photo-essay by renown photo-journalist Peter Turnley.
Some powerful highlights:
Ft. Wayne, IN, 1974
Rwanda, 1994 (NSFL)
Kosovo, 1999
Basra, 2003
Seville, 2010
Havana, 2012 [more inside]
posted by growabrain on May 11, 2014 - 9 comments

Ink Punching

Parisian tattoo artist Gue T Deep made a slow motion video of his hand at work.
posted by gman on May 7, 2014 - 12 comments

Vintage Paris

Vintage Paris Paris tragics will enjoy this one. Others may enjoy it anyway!
posted by Wolof on May 7, 2014 - 25 comments

OMG who stole my ads?

Imagining art triumphing over consumerism in an urban utopia. (Art project, via.)
posted by RedOrGreen on Mar 27, 2014 - 28 comments

L'épicerie magnifique et l'épicerie horrible

The delightful Bill Cunningham covers the latest trends in groceries gone awry at this year's Paris Fashion Week.
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Mar 15, 2014 - 8 comments

From the Fifteenth Arrondissement

Mavis Gallant, one of finest writers in English of the 20th century, has died. Gallant was 91, and had been suffering from osteoporosis for many years. [more inside]
posted by jokeefe on Feb 18, 2014 - 16 comments

From the XFL to the NFL

Paris Lenon, the last active player from the XFL, is playing today for the Broncos. The XFL disbanded in 2001 after one season. (The XFL didn't have a coin toss, it had a mad scramble for the ball. Watch Lenon's Memphis Maniax play the Orlando Rage.)
posted by PHINC on Feb 2, 2014 - 36 comments

Iranian photographer Majid Saeedi won first prize of Lucas Dolega Award!

Majid Saeedi's work is quite impressive! He already won several other prizes and awards. Today was the Lucas Dolega award, in Paris. Saeedi is an award winning and internationally recognized Iranian photographer who has photographed Middle East with a focus on the humanitarian aspect for the past two decades. He also takes a special interest in telling the untold stories of social issues and social injustice through his photos. photo 1, photo 2, photo 3, photo 4
posted by gbenard on Jan 20, 2014 - 8 comments

Hello, my name is David Lynch. And Burroughs. And Warhol.

David Lynch is back, and he's showing new fantastic photography at la Maison Européenne de Photographie: "Small Stories". (European House of Photography). This, in case you're in Paris, from Jan 15th to March 16th. But if you're in London, from Jan 17th to March 30th, you can see at The Photographers Gallery: David Lynch "The Factory Photographs"; William S. Burroughs "Taking Shots" and Andy Warhol with his Photographs from 1976 to 1987.
posted by gbenard on Jan 17, 2014 - 4 comments

Poe, Doré, their Raven and Paris.

If you're planning to visit Paris, le Musée d'Orsay, after the polemic Masculin/Masculin, will open next month a new exhibition: Gustave Doré (1832-1883): The Power of the Imagination, and it’s likely there will be a renewed focus on the dark romanticism of the 19th-century French artist. Some of Gustave Doré’s most haunting engravings were for Edgar Allan Poe. And about Poe's Raven that inspired Doré, you can see more at Hyperallergic. Now you know: From February 18 to May 11. Musée d'Orsay, Paris
posted by gbenard on Jan 14, 2014 - 13 comments

Don't Sweat The Technique

The most amazing six-year-old breakdancer you will ever see. Happy New Year!
posted by jason's_planet on Dec 31, 2013 - 22 comments

Euphoria, panic, and delusions: Stendhal, Paris and Jerusalem Syndromes

Marie-Henri Beyle was a French novelist, better known by his pen name Stendhal. Though he is now known for his acute analysis of his characters' psychology and he is considered one of the earliest and foremost practitioners of realism, during his lifetime his reputation was largely based on his books dealing with the arts and with tourism. He is also notable for personal experiences he recorded in Naples and Florence: A Journey from Milan to Reggio. There he wrote that his "heart was beating fast at the thought of entering Florence," then when in the Basilica of Santa Croce, he "experienced the most intense pleasure art has ever bestowed upon me ... a sort of ecstasy." Later, he "was seized with a fierce palpitation of the heart;" he "walked in constant fear of falling to the ground." This was the first recorded case of hyperkulturemia, also known as the Stendhal or Florence Syndrome, a psychosomatic reaction to art and/or scenes of beauty. Similar psychosomatic experiences have been recorded in Paris and Jerusalem, though the former largely linked to cultural shock and disconnect at the imagined and real Paris, while the latter most often associated with evangelical Christian tourists who are overwhelmed by their experiences and come to believe they are the Chosen One. The good news for people who suffer from any of these syndromes: the symptoms generally diappear once the person leaves the location or region that set off the psychosomatic illness.
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 28, 2013 - 19 comments

H

Heroin: art and culture's last taboo
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Dec 22, 2013 - 112 comments

Mirrors on the ceiling

That Intoxicating Pink
Rose champagne is the intoxicant of choice for courtesans and kings. Beautiful, expensive, and rare, it was beloved by the grandest of the grandes horizontales of nineteenth-century Paris—and the men who could afford to love them. In Second Empire France, the Countess Henkel von Donnersmarck—known to historians of the libido as La Païva, and earlier as Esther Lachmann, late of the Moscow ghetto—demanded magnums of it as a “gratuity” while entertaining clients in the boudoir of her ill-begotten Hotel de la Païva on the Champs-Élysées.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Nov 19, 2013 - 18 comments

Fée Paradis

CocoRosie performing live on May 27th at Bouffes Du Nord, Paris. (youtube link) [more inside]
posted by mannequito on Nov 10, 2013 - 10 comments

Guidebooks for Time Travelers

Numerous "Stranger's Guides" written for 19th Century tourists can be found on the Internet Archive. A sample: New York (1828). Boston (1857). Washington DC (1884). Montreal (1872). London (1828). Paris (1822). United States and Canada (1838).
posted by ShooBoo on Nov 1, 2013 - 16 comments

Adventures in temporary art

Paris 13 is a massive art exhibit inside a soon to be demolished building in France's capital. [via MyModernMet] [more inside]
posted by sacrifix on Oct 19, 2013 - 8 comments

Reflections on a Paris Left Behind

Even Hemingway, so easily spoofed, raved about the oysters. But he knew something of himself, and something of this extraordinary city, and what it gave to him. “There is never any ending to Paris and the memory of each person who has lived in it differs from that of any other,” he wrote. “Paris was always worth it and you received return for whatever you brought to it.” Yet then he added, with just the right soupçon of sadness: “But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy.”
posted by caddis on Oct 19, 2013 - 9 comments

FIP Radio

In 1971 Jean Garetto and Pierre Codou began to dream of a radio station that could calm even the drivers stuck on the Paris Périphérique. It would play wonderful, unexpected music chosen by people who knew their onions. The tracks would be drawn from diverse genres and chosen to seque enchantingly. There would be no jingles, commercials or self-aggrandising DJs - not even defined programs - just some announcers chosen for their mellifluous voices but paid to mostly stay quiet. The result was - and is - FipRadio. Fans have included residents of Brighton in the UK who enjoyed an illegal re-transmission of the station for many years - and journalist David Hepworth who describes the thrill of hearing "a voice you want to marry whispering words you can't understand". Listen! [more inside]
posted by rongorongo on Sep 26, 2013 - 29 comments

Ipsos Global City Rankings 2013

British market-research firm Ipsos Mori has released the results of "The largest ever global study of the best city to do business in, live in, and visit." Interactive data here, more info here.
posted by Navelgazer on Sep 8, 2013 - 21 comments

The Red Balloon

The Red Balloon, originally released in 1956, by French filmmaker Albert Lamorisse, won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. A 34 minute short, filmed in the Ménilmontant neighborhood of Paris. The film received a 95% rating on RottenTomatoes. And, although it's been mentioned in comments once or twice here at MetaFilter, I don't believe it's ever been linked. Find your favorite 6 year old kid, make some popcorn, open a bottle of wine, champagne might be best, sit back, and enjoy. You'll find it a fantastic conversation starter with your little one.
posted by HuronBob on Aug 4, 2013 - 55 comments

What I want, what I really really want.

Frenchmen dance a Spice Girls medley ...in high heels.
posted by The Whelk on Jul 25, 2013 - 21 comments

Coen Brothers do Paris in 5 minutes (SLYT)

Paris Je T'aime - a short 5 minutes film by the Coen Brothers.
In Tuileries, a short film by Joel and Ethan Coen from the 2006 anthology, Paris Je T’Aime, Steve Buscemi plays a mild-mannered tourist caught completely out of his element. What transpires is a rather bizarre five-minute cultural lesson they won’t teach you at Berlitz. via Open Culture

posted by lipsum on Jul 1, 2013 - 24 comments

Time Travel to 1930's Paris

Paris Apartment opened for the first time in 70 years Including intriguing links to a scandalous Belle Époque art wold romance and a $3 million dollar painting. Subject of this AskMe last year but includes additional photos. [more inside]
posted by DarthDuckie on Jun 16, 2013 - 23 comments

"Not for the weak of stomach"

The Siege of Paris, during the Franco-Prussian War, lasted from September 1870 to January 1871. As the Prussian army blockaded the city, Parisians turned to ever more desperate food sources. Like the zoo animals. And other animals not normally eaten.
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 11, 2013 - 18 comments

A work of significant scale.

Ladies and gentlemen, for your pleasure please behold Leviathan [click image to advance to next image], a work by Anish Kapoor at the Grand Palais in Paris. Contemporary Art Blog link here. [more inside]
posted by shakespeherian on Apr 17, 2013 - 22 comments

“seeing is inescapably tied to scarring,"

STREET OF THE IRON PO(E)T, A Paris Diary by Henri Cole: "Today I visited the cenotaph to Baudelaire..." Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Part 5. Part 6.
posted by Fizz on Mar 31, 2013 - 3 comments

Pilotez notre fabuleuse machine à remonter le temps

Paris 1900-2013 by photos: Color photographs of Paris from the 1910s side-by-side with photographs of today. Now with swipey magic.
posted by shakespeherian on Mar 26, 2013 - 16 comments

Flash Friday: Second Empire Artistic Demimonde Edition

In the new game Avant-Garde, you play an up-and-coming artist in 19th century Paris, a contemporary of Manet and Bouguereau. Carve and sell allegorical statue groups! Get snubbed by Napoleon III! Subsidize Gustave Courbet's drinking! Compose and promulgate your own aesthetic manifesto!
posted by Iridic on Mar 8, 2013 - 56 comments

World War 2 bunker, pristine condition, barely used

In July 1939, French authorities started building a 120m² bomb shelter under the Gare de l’Est (East Railway Station) in Paris so that traffic controllers could keep on working if the station was attacked. However, it was not completed in time and the Germans used it instead. The bunker, which includes a pedal generator, is still there, in near perfect condition. Other images and video (in French). Bonus underground Parisian bunker: this Cold-war era bunker under the Ministry of Transportation (equipped with tandem pedal generators) will become a datacenter early 2014.
posted by elgilito on Feb 22, 2013 - 28 comments

"I want to show that you can still be beautiful or sexy with cancer."

A day before her 32nd birthday, Jill Brzezinski-Conley was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a double mastectomy. She's now 35, and her cancer has metastasized to terminal, stage-4. Sue Bryce won Australian Portrait Photographer of the Year in both 2011 and 2012, and last year's prize was a one-person trip to Paris. After hearing her story, Bryce took Brzezinski-Conley with her to the City of Light for a photo shoot and brought along a videographer. The resulting short film: "The Light That Shines." (Also on Vimeo.) Photos. (click the open magazine at the top of the page). The video and photos both show a topless Ms. Brzezinski-Conley, and may be nsfw. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Feb 6, 2013 - 25 comments

"Minuit à Paris" peut manger son coeur!

A collection of color photography and film footage of Paris and the surrounding area - from the early 20th century! - has been made available on the website of the Albert-Kahn Museum.
posted by jph on Jan 25, 2013 - 9 comments

Type 2

There are two types of subway riders in the world. Those who wonder, during an idle moment at a station, if they could beat the train to the next stop; and those who attempt to do so. Observe.
posted by heyho on Jan 24, 2013 - 81 comments

It was a "class 13" hotel, meaning bottom line.

The Beat Hotel and neighbourhood as seen through the lens of Harold Chapman.
Another interview with Chapman.
Amongst the photos Gregory Corso, Allen Ginsberg, Peter Orlovsky, William Burroughs, Brion Gysin and Mirtaud the cat.
The Beat Hotel (wiki) was probably the last Parisian 'Vie de Boheme'.
posted by adamvasco on Jan 21, 2013 - 9 comments

A time lapse night sight of Paris.

Paris, City of Light [SLVimeo] [more inside]
posted by Chutzler on Jan 2, 2013 - 6 comments

Banquet on wheels

The intro scene to 'Midnight in Paris' (2011. SLYT)
posted by growabrain on Dec 17, 2012 - 70 comments

Going Souterrain

Our aim is to examine [Paris's] connection to its underground in a way no one has before: we will attempt to walk from the southern edge to the northern, using only catacombs, telecom tunnels, sewers and other hidden infrastructure. It is a 14-mile trek, every step illegal.
posted by Chrysostom on Nov 5, 2012 - 56 comments

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