3883 posts tagged with Photography.
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Autism Visible

Inside the Spectrum: a hauntingly beautiful and thought provoking little collection of photographs of autistic people by Chris Combs, a fiercely talented photographer in his early 20s who works at the Washington Post. Read Combs' project description here. For more on autism, see here.
posted by digaman on Dec 8, 2005 - 16 comments

Big Eye in the Sky

Big Eye in the Sky. A collection of absolutely incredible 360 degree panoramas by St. Paul photographer Ed Fink of the Twin Cities, Mt. Rushmore, the Post-Katrina Gulf Coast and more. He claims to be the first photographer in the world to do full spherical (180 x 360) panoramas from a helicopter. The effect is truly spectacular. Those with vertigo beware.
posted by panoptican on Dec 8, 2005 - 19 comments

First People

First People is a collection of artworks, vintage photographs, clipart, legends, essays, treaties, poems and more, relating to the first peoples of America and Canada (Turtle Island). [via]
posted by peacay on Dec 5, 2005 - 6 comments

Armchair travel

Images of daily life Photoessays of daily life in Morocco, Yemen and Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, and Hong Kong. [An update on a plep thread from 2003, and some nice armchair travel for a Sunday morning]
posted by carter on Dec 4, 2005 - 8 comments

It's A Small World After All

The winners of the 2005 Nikon Small World Competition are up (previous years going back to 1977 are also worth a look). Photomicrography produces some amazing imagery, giving us glimpses into both the inner workings of living things, and the intricate structure of nonliving things (just click "find all").
posted by Gator on Dec 4, 2005 - 4 comments

The First Known Motion Picture

The first known motion picture (Quicktime movie, somewhat slow to download) was produced by Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince at Roundhay House, Leeds, UK some time before October of 1888. Its date can be verified, as the elderly lady in the film, Mrs. Sarah Whitley, died in that month. The two-second-long film was shot on paper or celluloid photographic film through a custom-made camera. Although the original paper film appears to have been lost, two photographic copies of the film dating from the 1930s remain in existence. Le Prince's second film, Traffic Crossing Leeds Bridge, was shot shortly afterwards.

Le Prince is generally not well-known outside the film historical community, partly because he did not publicize his works, but also because he disappeared in 1890 during a journey to Paris, France. It's thought that Le Prince committed suicide over money worries, but his body was never found.
posted by watsondog on Dec 3, 2005 - 29 comments

Experimentation in Film vs Digital

Alternative methods of photography When I first saw Scott Mutter [previously linked], I was hooked, and purchased a manual focus Nikon FG. I've resisted going digital (as have many) [partial nudity] until recently, when I purchased a DSLR - as I felt that nothing could come close to an SLR. While I love it, I find myself still fascinated by the older methods [main link], and the internet has allowed for easy distribution of unusual pinhole camera plans [annoying flash interface]. But is there a place for those of us holding on to the last fragments of traditional photography, or will alternative digital methods have to suffice?
posted by MysticMCJ on Dec 1, 2005 - 42 comments

Hi mom!

Iwan.com has lots of nice photos of interesting places and people and an inoffensive site layout.
posted by ab'd al'Hazred on Dec 1, 2005 - 21 comments

Portraits of Home

Portraits of Home: A set of 55 wonderful pictures relating to housing issues in greater Minnesota. This comes from a "Photography Exhibit Documents the Housing Challenges Facing Minnesota's Working Families".
posted by edgeways on Nov 30, 2005 - 10 comments

Say cheese!

This just in! First photo of Flying Spaghetti Monster taken using bacteria!
posted by brundlefly on Nov 27, 2005 - 51 comments

Bob Elsdale:photographer

Some pictures you are sure to like.
posted by hortense on Nov 21, 2005 - 88 comments

60's Greenwich Village by Robert Otter

Rare photographs of 60's Greenwich Village by Robert Otter. A genuine labor of love project, New York Tenor saxophonist/composer Ned Otter has compiled the work of his father Robert, a gifted photographer who passed away in 1986. Spanning 1962 through 1972, Otter's photographs capture moments from a Greenwich Village of the 60's that seem both inexplicably foreign and timelessly familiar. via alex
posted by rodney stewart on Nov 21, 2005 - 23 comments

The Image Culture

The Image Culture - a discussion of the history, manipulation, desensitization and supplanting of language skills by the ubiquity of images. And no, there are no pretty pictures.
posted by peacay on Nov 19, 2005 - 38 comments

Photography & tutorials

Norman Koren - photographs and tutorials
posted by Gyan on Nov 18, 2005 - 9 comments

Refocusing Camera

New milestone in digital photography: The ability to refocus a picture after it has been taken. Gallery and technical data.
posted by iamck on Nov 18, 2005 - 80 comments

Parallel Wales

Parallel Wales. They came from Wales, and settled in places called Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware. They brought new contributions to the American fabric, but also old names that took on new meanings. Now, more than a hundred years later, what echoes remain? (via Projects)
posted by selfnoise on Nov 18, 2005 - 10 comments

Dr Who - The Second Key

Dr Who - The Second Key. Original Dr Who strips made with photographed dolls and speech balloons.
posted by nthdegx on Nov 18, 2005 - 20 comments

When I think back on all the crap I learned in high school...

The Radiant Vista is a new photography site on the web that offers photoshop tutorials (in Quicktime and PDF) and daily photo critiques (Quicktime). Not much here for non-photographers, but I know a number of members have some interest in taking pictures and might find something good here.
posted by TedW on Nov 15, 2005 - 14 comments

Hoo doggies, but is it art?

The world's most expensive photocopy. An untitled cowboy photograph by Richard Prince set a record last night for the most expensive photograph sold at auction, with a price of $1,248,000. The catch? It's a re-photograph of pre-existing Marlboro ad.
posted by Robot Johnny on Nov 10, 2005 - 62 comments

the 'ghost city' of Cyprus

Michael Totten visits the 'ghost city' of Cyprus | "In 1974 the Turkish military invaded and carved up the island. Greek Cypriots in the north were forced to move south side of the line. Turkish Cypriots from the south were forced to move north. Greek Cypriot citizens in Varosha fled the Turkish invasion in terror. They expected to return to their homes within days. Instead, the Turks seized the empty city and wrapped it in fencing and wire. They forbid anyone from entering it to this day."
posted by jenleigh on Nov 3, 2005 - 75 comments

Pictures of Failure

Pictures of Failure: Incarcerated Youth. [via happy palace]
posted by mediareport on Nov 2, 2005 - 29 comments

Frank Hurley

Frank Hurley. You may be familiar with his work for Shackleton on the Endurance. Magnificent stuff, but only a fraction of what he was capable of. After the ice, he went to Europe where he did some of the most haunting photographs of WWI. Click the pictures to continue the series- they defy selection. (He did reluctantly create some fakes for the propaganda effort, but most of his stuff is straight and the better for it.) After the war he continued to travel, and for those with some time on their hands, the Australian government has been good enough to put a few thousand items of his work on line here)
posted by IndigoJones on Nov 2, 2005 - 27 comments

Images from the Chinese Cultural Revolution

Red Color News Soldier: "The project to bring Li Zhensheng’s photographs of the [Chinese] Cultural Revolution to the wider world was first conceived fifteen years ago in Beijing. It was there, at the Chinese Press Association's photography competition in March 1988, that Li first publicly exhibited twenty images from his "negative" negatives – that is, those which had been deemed counterrevolutionary under the political dictates of Chairman Mao Zedong."
posted by hall of robots on Nov 1, 2005 - 12 comments

Goetze

500 panoramic views of parks in 'quality' order. [QTVR] Here are the full screen VRs. All by Erik Goetze.
posted by tellurian on Oct 31, 2005 - 8 comments

it's frighteningly boooooootiful

Gallery of funeral art. On this halloween weekend, a brief collection of photographs of tombstone carvings & other cemetary decorations.
posted by jonson on Oct 29, 2005 - 6 comments

Alter Egos.

Alter Egos. Robbie Cooper explores the world of online gamers again.
posted by brautigan on Oct 28, 2005 - 7 comments

Best of the Wild

Wild-Landscape photography
posted by Gyan on Oct 27, 2005 - 15 comments

old photos

Retrieved photos: This fellow develops film that has been locked away in cameras, often for a long time. Some interesting photos. The commentary under the photos is a bit ... lackluster. A nice little site to waste a little time with.
posted by edgeways on Oct 27, 2005 - 49 comments

The Beauty of Afghanistan Remembered

The Beauty of Afghanistan Remembered is a wonderful photo essay by Joanne Warfield, who went to Afghanistan in 1977 before the Russian invasion. Her photos portray a land and people that probably don't even exist anymore.
posted by Edward King on Oct 22, 2005 - 11 comments

Hurricane Wilma

First hand report and photos as Hurricane Wilma smacks the holy bejesus out of the Cancun/Cozumel area.
"The Mexican government did a great job in evacuating thousands of tourists in a small span of 10 to 12 hours. For tourists the evacuations were mandatory. Though the shelters may be uncomfortable, they are safe. I wouldn't worry to much if you have friends or relatives here, they may not be able to communicate for the next few days, but they are safe. The winds are now EXTREMELY powerful, the noise is loud, the building is shaking, and the storm seems to be very angry. This building is built to code, and is probably one of the safest in the hotel zone, so we are not to worried, but small family homes must be in shambles. I will try and keep these updates coming as long as I can."
posted by jcterminal on Oct 21, 2005 - 16 comments

Dick Waterman's Blues Photos

Dick Waterman takes photographs of musicians. Choose a genre from the menu at the top of the page. The photos are good, but going through the Javascript interface allows you to read about each picture. In this photo of Dylan and Baez, Waterman captured Baez crying because Dylan was ignoring her. In this photo of Rev. Gary Davis, Waterman shows Davis sleeping with his guitar held vertically on his lap. And check out young John Fahey with Son House.This gallery of Seven Guitars was connected to Angus Wilson's play of the same name. My favorite is Elizabeth Cotten. Here's an NPR interview with Waterman.
posted by OmieWise on Oct 21, 2005 - 10 comments

Pep Bonet: Faith in Chaos

Faith in Chaos. Photojournalist Pep Bonet (previously mentioned in this excellent post) has won the 2005 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography, a $30,000 prize, to support his project on post-war Sierra Leone. The W. Eugene Smith Grant was founded in 1976 to provide financial freedom to photojournalists working on long-term projects in the humane tradition of W. Eugene Smith. Past winners have included Stanley Greene, Brenda Ann Kenneally, Sebastiao Salgado, Eli Reed, Eugene Richards and Gideon Mendel. More inside.
posted by matteo on Oct 21, 2005 - 5 comments

238 x 504 cm

Transparent Billboards Kasia Kesicka, at the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts in Poznan, creates a commentary on public space in various cities in Poland for his MFA final project in Photography. The result, mirroring the transparent laptop trick, is stunning and poignant {flash}
posted by MiltonRandKalman on Oct 19, 2005 - 36 comments

BW photo database

The art of black and white photography is not dead, but more and more developers / films are left by the wayside. And then someone comes along, and makes a database of 1500+ combinations of developers and black and white films. If the combination isn't in the database, it uses a series of formulae to calculate a likely developing time.
posted by SharQ on Oct 17, 2005 - 38 comments

They just don't know when to stop

A series of photos showing a multiple bike pile-up. [slow loading - no gore]
posted by tellurian on Oct 17, 2005 - 19 comments

Coleoptera and friends

Big beetles (Breed your own! They're cuddly!), tarantulas, scorpions, millipedes, various butterflies and moths.
posted by Wolfdog on Oct 16, 2005 - 18 comments

Miguel Lasa"s nature photography

Wildlife and Nature Photography by Miguel Lasa. Wow. (via)
posted by hortense on Oct 15, 2005 - 18 comments

uk music photographers

Music photography goodness - some UK-based photographers with plenty of image galleries of rock and pop bands: Peter Hill (also see his livejournal for more pics), Ami Barwell, Michael Williams, Scarlet Page, Graham Smith (on livejournal too), Emma Porter, and the already mentioned Andrew Kendall (lj). Also UrbanImage which licenses the work of several photographers and has sections on jazz, hip hop, grime, reggae, punk, etc. as well as travel photography and other cool stuff (free registration required to access single galleries and images).
posted by funambulist on Oct 15, 2005 - 5 comments

Bear vs Birdfeeder

Never store your honey in a birdfeeder for safe keeping. That's the FIRST place they look!
posted by jonson on Oct 15, 2005 - 28 comments

Toss your camera

Toss your camera.
posted by spock on Oct 14, 2005 - 44 comments

ArtsConversations

ArtsConversations, the archives of the C/IAF's Netropolitan Museum.
Browse works of art, sculpture, photography (some NSFW) , and more. [via->via->via chunky bacon]
posted by woj on Oct 13, 2005 - 1 comment

Silicon art

Silicon Zoo: Where's Waldo? Hiding in the silicon patterns of a computer chip. Michael Davidson has found a collection of microscopic art hidden by chip designers. This practice has been going on for decades, and the hidden images range from the iconic to the commemorative to the bizarre. Be sure to read the fine print. [See also this CNET story] (via)
posted by stopgap on Oct 13, 2005 - 12 comments

WW1 in color

Color Makes it Real. Hundreds of color photos from World War I. The site is in French, the interface is horriable, but the pictures can be haunting. Click on the links under Accés aux images for the pictures. Via beautifulstuff.org
posted by ShawnString on Oct 13, 2005 - 20 comments

Tom Gally's photographs of oddball stuff around Yokohama

Outside staircases. Doors. Stacks of stuff. People sleeping outside. And more. Mainly in Yokohama. Photographs by Tom Gally.
posted by Slithy_Tove on Oct 11, 2005 - 9 comments

I Found A Picture Of You

Lego Pinhole Camera. Polaroid Land Camera with Lego conversion. Sample photos.
posted by fandango_matt on Oct 9, 2005 - 12 comments

Germaine Greer on posing for Diane Arbus

Wrestling with Diane Arbus "She set up no lights, just pulled out her Rolleiflex, which was half as big as she was, checked the aperture and the exposure, and tested the flash. Then she asked me to lie on the bed, flat on my back on the shabby counterpane. I did as I was told. Clutching the camera she climbed on to the bed and straddled me, moving up until she was kneeling with a knee on both sides of my chest. She held the Rolleiflex at waist height with the lens right in my face. She bent her head to look through the viewfinder on top of the camera, and waited".
posted by matteo on Oct 8, 2005 - 25 comments

Tibetan and Himalayan Digital Library image database

30,000 photos in the online archive of the Tibetan and Himalayan Digital Library, a non-profit initiative from the University of Virginia, offering a large database of texts, audio, video, images, maps, bibliographies, journals, links and other resources for Himalayan studies.
posted by funambulist on Oct 7, 2005 - 7 comments

World Toy Camera Day Oct. 22, 2005

World Toy Camera Day October 22, 2005 (via toycamera.com)
posted by PenguinBukkake on Oct 6, 2005 - 7 comments

So you left Utah?

If you are going to Fall, well this is the place... I started visiting the orchards and farms of northern Utah a few years ago, to take my Dad out for drives, and to take pictures. I met many farmers up there, and came to love the front of Willard Peak, and the amazing canyons, water drainage, warm western rocky slopes; that make the best peaches anywhere. Perry, Utah has a mountain behind it, that is a sight to behold, and to the West is the National Migratory Bird Refuge. Shane Whitlock has covered this area pretty well, he is an enthusiastic photographer and chronicles the small town of Perry, the rodeos, the birds, the animals and the great fortune of small town existence.Here is my Dad's best friend's, barn. Mantua, Utah. Usually, the Utah "outsiders" see, is the red rock canyons of the southern part of the state. Northern Utah with the Great Salt Lake, and the Wasatch and Uinta mountain ranges is continuously elegant season to season, and peopled with all kinds of wonderful, tame and wild life.
posted by Oyéah on Oct 5, 2005 - 20 comments

American Historical Photos

PictureHistory - a source of American historical photographs
posted by Gyan on Oct 5, 2005 - 6 comments

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