3689 posts tagged with Photography.
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Empowering Children Through the Art of Photography

Kids with Cameras (warning, embedded QT video in link)
With an Oscar Nominated documentary, Born into Brothels, under her belt, Zana Briski's spinoff project, Kids with Cameras, teaches children growing up in difficult circumstances the art and skills of photography to empower them to appreciate the beauty and dignity of their own expression.
With projects in Calcutta, Haiti, Jerusalem and Cairo, they send great photographers to lead workshops, the children are given inexpensive 35mm cameras to capture whatever they choose and then the children's pictures are shown (and sold) around the world through exhibits, books and film.
posted by fenriq on Feb 27, 2005 - 7 comments

Close to Home

Close to Home: An American Album. 'This exhibition is devoted to American family photographs that were separated from their owners and then rediscovered by artists, writers, collectors, and museum curators. ' Highlights and site visitors' submissions.
Site of related interest :- BBC Family History; and Third Generation: Family Photographs and Memories of Nazi Germany.
posted by plep on Feb 26, 2005 - 2 comments

VR Church Tours

Virtual Reality Tours of Seven European Churches Beautiful quicktime panoramas taken inside and outside of the churches. Navigate using maps or image hotspots. I really like the Sant' Andrea Mantova, built by Alberti between 1470 and 1476.
posted by carter on Feb 26, 2005 - 4 comments

Joel-Peter Witkin

The morbid photography of Joel-Peter Witkin. (some of the pictures might be nsfw.)
posted by hopeless romantique on Feb 24, 2005 - 47 comments

The Real

Howard Hughes on the set of Hell's Angels. For some reason, the Wisconsin Historical Society has a huge collection of stills from old movies that they are slowly releasing online. This collection is part of the material they sent to Scorsese for pre-production of The Aviator.
posted by rev- on Feb 24, 2005 - 9 comments

Useful Photography Advice

How to Do Anything Photographic This site — while not as extensive as good ol' photo.net — has plenty of practical advice. The technique section, in particular, is worthwhile reading for amateur photographers. (Alas, according to the author, I'll never be able to photograph birds.)
posted by jdroth on Feb 23, 2005 - 31 comments

Time-lapse movies of plants

Plants in motion Time-lapse movies of plants doing plant-like things, such as growing, nutating, opening up, and being smelly. [requires quicktime]
posted by carter on Feb 22, 2005 - 23 comments

Urban Experience in Chicago: Hull-House and Its Neighbourhoods 1889-1963

Urban Experience in Chicago: Hull-House and Its Neighbourhoods 1889-1963. Scholarly urban history project.
posted by plep on Feb 19, 2005 - 7 comments

[N]SFW

Mayumi Lake makes pornography out of your non-lascivious body parts. Or she makes art by miming pornography's camera angles and costumes. She calls it Poo-Chi. (NSFW) Here's an artist's statement and here's a very brief gallery essay.
posted by nobody on Feb 18, 2005 - 12 comments

""But I'm 41 now. That era, it's gone".

Touch Me I'm Sick. Photographer Charles Peterson helped America see grunge from the inside out. His dramatic black-and-white images portrayed the energy of the music being performed in crowded basements and dingy dive bars featuring such bands as Nirvana, Mudhoney, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Hole, Black Flag, Fugazi, and Sonic Youth, among others. "Touch Me I’m Sick: Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographs by Charles Peterson" will be on view at the Chrysler Museum of Art through May 1. More inside.
posted by matteo on Feb 18, 2005 - 24 comments

The New Wave Photos of Philippe Carly

The New Wave Photos of Philippe Carly. The Belgian native photographed just about every punk, new wave, goth, etc., band that played in Europe in the late 1970s and through the 1980s. There is a veritable horn o' plenty of concert photos to ogle with supposedly more on the way.
posted by NoMich on Feb 17, 2005 - 14 comments

James Whitlow Delano, photographer

A Tale of Two Chinas, by photographer James Whitlow Delano. Whole swaths of cities have vanished, to be transformed with developments that have quickly made them look more like Houston, Qatar, or Singapore than the ancient China of our mind's eye. The old hutong, or alleyways, of Beijing that once formed a mosaic of passageways and the siheyuan, or walled courtyard houses, have been largely razed. The old brick rowhouses of Shanghai, are now being leveled and replaced by modern high-rises. Traditional marketplaces, residential neighborhoods, streets where medicine shops or bookstores bunched together, are now either gone or have been rouged up as tourist destinations, part of a new synthetic, virtual version of China's incredible past. The energy fueling this transformation bespeaks a powerful but often blind, unquestioning faith in an inchoate idea of progress that takes one's breath away, often literally. (Unrestrained growth has left China with the dubious honor of having 9 of the 10 most polluted cities in the world). Delano's new book is "Empire: Impressions from China". More inside.
posted by matteo on Feb 17, 2005 - 23 comments

ultraviolet bats

But who are we to know such things? What if what first appeared as a solid yellow flower was in fact a series of radiating stripes? Another prominent one here. This is the world of ultraviolet as photographed by Bjørn Rørslett, the world as it is seen by insects and... bats and other mammals?
posted by vacapinta on Feb 16, 2005 - 19 comments

So much intimacy with no romance.

Cabinet of Art and Medicine is a really neat collection of historical medical photography and related poetry. Compiler Mark Rowley has published an extensive bibliography of historical medical photography and in an easily missed section of his site offers his own poetic commentary on a few pictures. I found the whole thing rather moving. (medical nudity)
posted by thirteenkiller on Feb 16, 2005 - 6 comments

Copyrighting public space

Chicago's current archetectual and artistic showcase, Millenium Park seems to be causing some problems. The pedestrian bridge was closed because the hardwood used to build it can not take the salt used to remove ice from pedestrian walkways. But it also seems that the massive sculpture Cloud Gate aka "The Bean" is a copyright elephant in public space. Park security are shaking down photographers for permits. As is typical, the copyright shakedown appears to be less about protecting the rights of the original artists, and more about the rights of the distributor (in this case, the city's desired monopoly on postcards and prints). See boing boing for editorializing and Slashdot for the typical herd reaction.
posted by KirkJobSluder on Feb 12, 2005 - 22 comments

v zimnikh gorakh

Mountain photography from Russia and around the world, including some nice panoramas. Browse the archive by date from the left column, or choose albums (such as this one) from the right column.
posted by Wolfdog on Feb 12, 2005 - 7 comments

World press Photo Awards 2004

World Press Photo Awards 2004
posted by biffa on Feb 11, 2005 - 21 comments

Papapetrou & Lewis

Melbourne artist Polixeni Papapetrou takes photographs of her daughter that are inspired by Lewis Carroll. For the same reasons. [Links SFW but be careful clicking around]
posted by tellurian on Feb 10, 2005 - 14 comments

Naturalist, Old Skool Blogger

To live in a pristine land ... to roam the wilderness ... to choose a site, cut trees, and build a home ... Thousands have had such dreams, but Richard Proenneke lived them. In 1968, at 51 years of age, Richard Proenneke retired to Upper Twin Lakes, Alaska and using nothing but hand tools, built a cabin where he lived for the next 30 or so years. He filmed the cabin's construction (as well as much of nature's wonder) and kept meticulous notes on the back of wall calendars. In 1973, Sam_Keith produced a book (One Man's Wilderness: An Alaskan Odyssey) based on Proenneke's journal entries and photography. In 1999, at the age of 82, Proenneke could no longer endure the harsh winters of Alaska and moved to California to be with his family. He died there on Easter Sunday, 2003.
posted by a_day_late on Feb 10, 2005 - 16 comments

Apollo 11 - 17 Mission Panoramas

Apollo 11 - 17 Mission Panoramas - Hans Nyberg treats us with a stunning full-screen use of QTVR, taking high-resolution scans of Apollo 11, 12 and 17 panoramic photographs, stitching them together for a full 360° view. [from Slashdot]
posted by AlexReynolds on Feb 8, 2005 - 17 comments

Sylvia Plachy

'Falling in love with the truth'. On Dec. 10, 1956, exactly one month after Soviet troops crushed the last hopes of the Hungarian Revolution, 13-year-old Sylvia Plachy lay hidden in a farm cart that was carrying her toward the Austrian border. That night, Plachy and her parents escaped, finally making their way to the United States. The family settled in Queens, New York, where the teenager grew up to become one of the most incisive photographers of her generation. Many of the photographs will be displayed this spring at the Rose Gallery in Los Angeles, and are on view now at New York's Hunter Fox Gallery, where Plachy (scroll down) recently talked about the book and her career. Her pictures "have to do with what memory looks like,' she explains. "How you remember things. Not so much how they are, but how they get translated." Oh, she's Adrien Brody's mom and she uses a Holga.
posted by matteo on Feb 8, 2005 - 15 comments

Pinhole photographs of London and New York

Pinhole photographs of London and New York "I am walking London Underground's Circle Line. On the tube it ordinarily it takes a little over an hour. I'll be doing it on foot, taking slow pinhole photographs, between two stations at a time." Plenty of other stuff on the site too.
posted by carter on Feb 8, 2005 - 14 comments

Aïna Photo Agency

Aïna Photo Agency : Afghanistan Through Afghan Photojournalists' Eyes. "In October 2002, 25 students -- men and women ranging from age 13 to 40 -- were selected from a list of 400 candidates and began training at the Kabul-based Aïna Media and Cultural Center. The goal was to train a young generation of Afghan photojournalists, and Aïna Photo became the first photojournalism school in Afghanistan." Via Digital Journalist. Some pictures NSFW (opium production/use related.)
posted by NewBornHippy on Feb 7, 2005 - 5 comments

You can't make this stuff up

Oakland-based photographer Scott Squire documents both the familiar and the unfamiliar in a style he calls NonFiction Photography. There's some pretty amazing stuff here.
posted by pmbuko on Feb 4, 2005 - 4 comments

Nature & Wildlife Photography Magazine

Nature Photographers - an online resource dedicated to the art and technique of nature, wildlife and landscape photography.
posted by Gyan on Feb 3, 2005 - 4 comments

Mapping Sitting

Mapping Sitting explores the uses and traditions of photographic portraiture over the past century in the Middle East.
posted by scody on Feb 3, 2005 - 5 comments

Brian Lockett's various museums

The Goleta Air & Space Museum/ Goleta Natural History Museum While looking for hot spring photos, I found this virtual museum. It is loaded with amazing shots of warbirds in flight and the latest in space travel On the other hand some very well done nature photography. Including desert panoramas This is all the work of one man.
posted by hortense on Jan 31, 2005 - 13 comments

Yet more travel photography.

Plan your escape route. [flash]
posted by monju_bosatsu on Jan 31, 2005 - 16 comments

Tracy Boulian

Tracy Boulian's sports photography is dramatic, humane, sometimes eerie, and sometimes simply beautiful.
posted by alms on Jan 31, 2005 - 12 comments

armchair excursion to the Alps

I came upon an enchanting gallery of Lac Léman ice storm photos via presurfer today, which then led me to some rather beautiful scenes of the the Alps. There was also an amazing shot from space, and a link to another site where I followed hikers to les Massif de Bauges and le Massif de la Grande Chartreuse. OK, I didn't get my work done today, but I had a marvelous trip to the Alps.
posted by madamjujujive on Jan 30, 2005 - 16 comments

Misty Keasler: photographic essays

Misty Keasler's photographic essays range from quirky views of her east Texas extended family and Japanese love hotels to unsettling essays on orphanages and the Guatemala City dump. flash. via gordon.coale.
posted by madamjujujive on Jan 26, 2005 - 12 comments

Fetish Photography

Lithium Picnic is one of the multitude of fetish/goth photography sites, but with a low key, only slightly snobbish attitude and many great photos. Apnea, Anyssa, Domiana. (Main link is possibly NSFW, all the photos I linked to are SFW, but others on-site probably are not.)
posted by Captaintripps on Jan 26, 2005 - 10 comments

Photo Treks

A trifecta of photographic sites: TrekEarth,TrekLens and TrekNature.
posted by Gyan on Jan 25, 2005 - 9 comments

Photographs of London Underground Stations

Photographs of London Underground Stations Taken on black and white film, then coloured in photoshop. A nice example.
posted by carter on Jan 25, 2005 - 34 comments

Lake Karakul

Jorg Schniedmayer and Armin Scrinzi's road trip photos of China These images are part of a large photo essay.I think the Lake Karakal, the best nature photography I have seen, lately.
posted by hortense on Jan 24, 2005 - 8 comments

The yellow ones taste like burning!

Pansies! Think you've got it bad? Bad like this? Bad like this? Perhaps you think you've beat this one? Visit the Digital Snow Museum to put things in perspective.
posted by mudpuppie on Jan 22, 2005 - 39 comments

Architecture of Density

Architecture of Density, by Michael Wolf • Dizzying photos of Hong Kong high-rise buildings. Think of bamboo stalks, Lego pieces, spinal columns, circuit boards...
posted by dhoyt on Jan 22, 2005 - 35 comments

Lee Miller: The Real Surrealist

From muse to master Lee Miller started out as a Vogue model, but by 1930 she had moved behind the lens to take piercing photographs -- culminating in her rage-fuelled portraits of Nazi kitsch. The "Lee Miller: Portraits" exhibit is at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from February 3 until May 30. More inside.
posted by matteo on Jan 22, 2005 - 15 comments

Spare a thought?

Simon Hoegsberg's latest project involved stopping passersby and asking what they were thinking at exactly that moment. These are their thoughts and portraits.
posted by freddles on Jan 21, 2005 - 16 comments

Cheney's puppet, huh? Cheney can kiss my wooden ass.

All About George. He's curious, he's clever, he's cool, he makes millions without words. Just one of many online exhibitions at PhotoArts. (via Everlasting Blort.)
posted by scody on Jan 21, 2005 - 7 comments

Mona Kuhn: Photographs

Mona Kuhn: (NSFW) Photographs. An interview with the artist is here, other images are here. Kuhn is among the photographers whose work is on display now at the Photo L.A. art exposition (Santa Monica Civic Auditorium). Again, her images (nudes, non-graphic) and most of this post's links are generally not safe for work. This one, instead, is SFW
posted by matteo on Jan 21, 2005 - 8 comments

Inaugural protest pics

Inaugural protest pics (series begins at that photo): Kevin Smith attended the inaugural protests and took some (IMHO) really good photographs that you weren't likely to see on any of the mainstream media outlets. Outside of the subject matter itself, I enjoy his photos and wanted to share these given this sets timeliness. In particular, I like this one and love this one. Non protest pics can be find by using the first link and then navigating back through his archives.
posted by jperkins on Jan 20, 2005 - 82 comments

In Soviet Russia, lake circumvents you!

A golden buckle on the steel girdle of Russia : Completed in 1905 and considered to be among the major masterpieces of Russian engineering, the Circum-Baikal Railway offers Trans-Siberian Rail passengers breathtaking views of the world's oldest lake and its rugged surroundings. Over only 72 kilometers, the railway's designers had to construct 200 bridges and viaducts and 33 tunnels to navigate the terrain.
posted by sellout on Jan 19, 2005 - 11 comments

Seasame Street Photo Project

There aren't very many there yet, and the signs are illegible for all but the 3rd set of photos, but I still really like the idea behind These are the People in my Neighborhood. You walk around your neighborhood and take pictures of people holding signs with the lyrics from Sesame Street. Very interesting and probably a good way to actually meet your neighbors. via
posted by willnot on Jan 19, 2005 - 9 comments

Stand By Your Statue

Stand By Your Statue - like all the best ideas, this one is simplicity itself: you find a statue, you stand by it and imitate it while one of your mates takes a photograph. What could be easier? What could be more entertaining? It's the kind of thing the Internet was invented for!
posted by The Ultimate Olympian on Jan 17, 2005 - 23 comments

the People's Palaces - a beautiful ride

Fabulous images of the Moscow Metro underground, also known as "the people's palaces". Click "M"s on the entry map to view gorgeous (often architecturally surreal) panoramic images, and visit the picture gallery for sweet details. Via Jorgen at Viewropa.
posted by taz on Jan 14, 2005 - 24 comments

City pics rule!

While looking for photos of Sacramento, CA I came across The World City Photo Archive. Find your favorite city from around the world (organized by country) or check out photos of landmarks.
posted by Bag Man on Jan 13, 2005 - 11 comments

Blue Anus

Blue Anus A small, mysterious neon sign in a window on the fourth floor.
posted by growabrain on Jan 13, 2005 - 64 comments

The work of Charles and Ray Eames

Charles Eames (1907-78) and Ray Eames (1912-88) gave shape to America's twentieth century. Their lives and work represented the nation's defining social movements: the West Coast's coming-of-age, the economy's shift from making goods to the producing information, and the global expansion of American culture. This Library of Congress exhibit outlines major themes of the Eames' life and voluminous works, including architecture, furniture, and the film Powers of Ten. It is wonderfully illustrated with artifacts, photos of their life and work, and examples from the Eames' collection of 350,000 slides.
posted by carter on Jan 12, 2005 - 14 comments

My, my shadow

Meta meta meta self. Photographer Donald Andrew Agarrat plays -- er, poses with himself.
posted by mudpuppie on Jan 8, 2005 - 18 comments

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