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20 Historic Black and White Photos Colorized

When we see old photos in black and white, we sometimes forget that life back then was experienced in the same vibrant colours that surround us today. This gallery of talented artists helps us remember that. Via r/ColorizedHistory.
posted by cthuljew on Aug 23, 2013 - 72 comments

Abandoned Buildings AND Cute Animals

Once upon a time, a man explored some abandoned cottages. The people had left long ago, but the houses were still being lived in. Fortunately, the man was a photographer.
posted by Lou Stuells on Aug 22, 2013 - 26 comments

Never let a good beard go to waste.

Behold! The Amazing and Terrifying Stop Motion Animated Magic Beard. [slyt | via]
posted by quin on Aug 21, 2013 - 12 comments

Devices of delight and wonder

Unlikely but not impossible images.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 21, 2013 - 28 comments

New York Before and After a Century or So

NYC Grid is hosting a neat photo-series which lets you slide back and forth between images of New York today and a similar shot from the early 20th century. [via]
posted by quin on Aug 19, 2013 - 10 comments

Take five, and rest your dogs here.

Now it's time for America's new favorite game: Hot Dogs or Legs? (single-serving Tumblr, with mustard and relish.)
posted by Strange Interlude on Aug 18, 2013 - 39 comments

Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come

This week the Getty Museum announced that it is making 4600 digital images of public domain materials in its collections freely available, with plans to release more as their status is confirmed. You can browse the collection here, or take a look at some selected highlights. Want more free images? Try these repositories.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Aug 17, 2013 - 30 comments

Tasty Rorschach

Esther Lobo is a photographer who has recently started playing with food.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 16, 2013 - 5 comments

Photos Of Child Labor Between 1908 And 1916 in the USA

A photograph of breaker boys that changed history for millions of kids in America, who worked grueling lives as child laborers. What Charles Dickens did with words for the underage toilers of London, Lewis Hine did with photographs for the youthful laborers in the United States. Library of Congress collection of over 5,000 Lewis Hine child labor photos. Kentucky 1916. Previously. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Aug 15, 2013 - 6 comments

The everyday hate

A Day in the Life of the Ku Klux Klan, Uncensored
posted by flapjax at midnite on Aug 14, 2013 - 66 comments

Marvelous photographs of 19th Century London street life

The street photographer I share with you this week was a man born in Great Britain an entire century before Winogrand and Friedlander. His name was John Thomson (1837-1921) and it is known that he traveled the Far East taking photographs during much of the period between 1860-1879. When he returned to London, he began taking documentary photographs of everyday people on the streets of London. Via madamjujujive
posted by nickyskye on Aug 13, 2013 - 18 comments

Stand clear of the closing doors

I Left My Camera Bag on a Train We surveyed the area and figured out which direction to take for about 2 seconds, but as soon as we were about to move out along the platform, it hit me…“Where is my camera bag?”
posted by ThePinkSuperhero on Aug 11, 2013 - 19 comments

Don't Steal Photos!

"This wall of shame is dedicated to photographers that feel that it's okay to steal others work and post it as their own. Oh I'm sorry, it's okay to let their "web designer" do it."
posted by nevercalm on Aug 10, 2013 - 53 comments

Hotter Than You. Younger Than You. Richer Than You.

"Flaunting themselves on Instagram, they are also all proudly and openly gay ... But at the same time, they all look fairly heteronormative: hunky, sporty, the kind of guy who would call himself “masc & musc” in a hook-up app and would never take a photo of himself at Drag Brunch. And all are careful to avoid appearing like they are doing this just to get laid. By showing that, they would be revealing that they are vulnerable and have needs, and an #Instastud can never look unsatisfied with his life." Meet The #Instastuds - The Cut looks at the gays on instragram who really want to you look at them and how they live. Contains a link to a discussion of “Fire Island Pines, Polaroids 1975 to 1983” at Salon. (NSFW, nudity)
posted by The Whelk on Aug 9, 2013 - 36 comments

Time is a Dimension

"This series of images are mostly landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes, and they are a single composite made from sequences that span 2-4 hours ... The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time..."
posted by griphus on Aug 9, 2013 - 9 comments

Detroit Unbroken Down

The Story interviews photographer Dave Jordano, a native of Detroit and long-time resident of Chicago, who has returned to his hometown to make portraits of people who did not leave. In his online exhibit “Detroit Unbroken Down,” he passes up the grand spaces in ruin or crumbling homes that have become symbols of the Motor City, but focuses on the faces of the city.
posted by Bistle on Aug 8, 2013 - 8 comments

Capturing America

In 1971, the newly-created US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hired a bunch of freelance photographers to collectively document environmental issues around the country. They were given free rein to shoot whatever they wanted, and the project, named Documerica, lasted through 1977. After 40 years, the EPA is now encouraging photographers to take current versions of the original Documerica photos and are showcasing them on flickr at State of the Environment. There are location challenges, and a set has been created with some of the submissions, making side-by-side comparisons. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 8, 2013 - 16 comments

"Let your sources surprise you."

Enter some text about your interests or research topic into the Serendip-O-Matic, and get an intriguing array of related images and primary sources from the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Europeana, and Flickr Commons. A One Week | One Tool project.
posted by Miko on Aug 7, 2013 - 4 comments

Monk takes devotion to new heights

Maxime the monk lives on a pillar. When he wants to step down out of the clouds, the 59-year-old scales a 131-foot ladder, which takes him about 20 minutes. Photographer Amos Chapple heard about Maxime while working in the country of Georgia, and when he first arrived and asked to go up, he was told no. Chapple stayed and prayed with the men at the base for four days before he was told he could ascend the pillar. [more inside]
posted by nevercalm on Aug 4, 2013 - 43 comments

Flash Bang Wallop

Pictures from the past - From definitive moments in history to milestones in photography: outstanding images selected by the picture editors of the Guardian and Observer (some nsfw) [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 3, 2013 - 8 comments

Arachnophabulous

The Most Exquisitely Weird Spiders You Will Ever See. [more inside]
posted by mazola on Jul 31, 2013 - 47 comments

work it, McDreamy!

Why don't we find men sexy when they're presented in pinup poses considered sexy for women? Photographer Rion Sabean's Men-Ups! project is "... aimed at reversing the stereotypes created by society, begging the questions, why is it sexual for a female to pose one way, and not sexual for a male? Why is it considered more comical or unsettling for males to act the more socially defined feminine?"
posted by Annie Savoy on Jul 31, 2013 - 112 comments

"People treated it with respect, but didn't particularly enjoy it."

In 1973, The Who released their sixth album, Quadrophenia. The epic double album tells the story of a boy named Jimmy Cooper who deals with mental illness on top of the run-of-the-mill stresses of teen life. But Jimmy Cooper isn't just any London teen.  Jimmy Cooper is a Mod. [more inside]
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Jul 29, 2013 - 68 comments

A year's worth of the life of a tree.

Mark Hirsch worked as a professional photographer for almost 20 years. He was laid off, then he was hit by a truck. He all but stopped working, until he got an iPhone. His friend goaded him into using the camera, and he started taking pictures of "That Tree." A little more than a year later he was profiled in "How a tree helped heal me."
posted by nevercalm on Jul 29, 2013 - 14 comments

This is not a bad place, not the hell it had been..."

"Founded in 1912 as a farm colony of Brooklyn State Hospital, the Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens [New York] became, by mid-century, a world unto itself. At its peak, it housed some 7,000 patients. They tended gardens and raised livestock on the hospital’s grounds. The hospital contained gymnasiums, a swimming pool, a theater, a television studio, and giant kitchens and laundries where patients were put to work. Today, Creedmoor, still run by the New York State Office of Mental Health, has only a few hundred patients" and houses The Living Museum, an 'art asylum within an asylum' where patients can create and exhibit their art. But what is life like inside the institution itself? In 2010, Katherine B. Olsen spent weeks interviewing staff and patients. Her essay, published this week, 'Something More Wrong' takes us inside Creedmoor's women's ward. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 29, 2013 - 7 comments

she would often either fall asleep or cry after making an image

"Arresting Portraits of Children in Water" by Wendy Sacks [Some nudity.]
posted by andoatnp on Jul 25, 2013 - 19 comments

"So a sardine is not a sardine is not a sardine!"

The Sardine Museum with host Tony Nunziata (part two, part three, part four, part five). Bonus: Tony tells a short story. [more inside]
posted by Ice Cream Socialist on Jul 23, 2013 - 8 comments

Degrassi Panthers

Degrassi Panthers "Degrassi Panthers is a blog dedicated to mapping out the shoot locations of all 3 seasons of the Canadian TV series Degrassi Junior High."
posted by chunking express on Jul 23, 2013 - 13 comments

What It Would Look Like If You Dropped Manhattan Into the Grand Canyon

Through the use of Photoshop, Swiss photographer Gus Petro shows us what it would look like if Manhattan was dropped into the middle of the Grand Canyon.
posted by reenum on Jul 20, 2013 - 66 comments

Where the water burns

From Slate's 'Behold' photo blog: This Is What Fracking Really Looks Like. See more of photographer Nina Berman's documentation of Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale region at her website collection called fractured: the shale play.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jul 19, 2013 - 57 comments

Portraitlandia

Portraitlandia, a series of portraits of residents of Portland, Oregon (one nude). [more inside]
posted by Nelson on Jul 19, 2013 - 42 comments

"A very primitive form that quickly becomes predictable."

Can Photojournalism Survive in the Instagram Era? (single link Mother Jones via) "It is no accident that so much of the most important work by photographers [on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan] has been on veterans as they return to the United States—one has more freedom in how one photographs."
posted by spamandkimchi on Jul 18, 2013 - 1 comment

Somali-American Success Stories

Minneapolis photographer highlights Somali-American success stories
For years, any time photographer Mohamud Mumin turned to local television channels or to newspapers for news about the Minneapolis Somali community, what he found left him disappointed.
Mumin said the media highlights the dark side of the community and abandons the many success stories and positive contributions Somali immigrants are making in their new home -- a remark many in the community agree.
“There are many great things the community is doing,” he said. “Why can’t I see those stories in the media? Why only the negative ones?”
Mumin, 36, recently took matters into his own hands. In 2010, he began capturing the images of 13 Twin Cities Somali-American men, documenting their stories in “The Youth/Dhallinyarada,” a multimedia project that focuses on the effort these men are making to improve the lives of those around them. (“Dhallinyarada” means “the youth” in Somalia.)
[more inside]
posted by jillithd on Jul 18, 2013 - 4 comments

Basil Pao: The Man Who Shot Everything

Basil Pao (鲍皓昕) is a photographer, among other things. He's probably most famous for his involvement with Michael Palin's travel series. He was featured in the fifth episode of Michael Palin's Around the World in 80 Days*. After that, he became the stills photographer for subsequent series of Palin's travels (Pole to Pole, Full Circle, Sahara, Himalaya, New Europe and Brazil, so far). [more inside]
posted by jiawen on Jul 17, 2013 - 5 comments

Ping pong will never be the same

Dynamic target tracking camera system keeps its eye on the ball - motorized mirrors track a moving object of interest every thousandth of a second, reflecting its image into a camera
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Jul 16, 2013 - 23 comments

I'm me :D

"You are you" looks at a gender nonconforming camp for boys. [more inside]
posted by yeoz on Jul 16, 2013 - 68 comments

Fred Ni, dog publicist...

The dog "basically just sat in that Quebec shelter for over a year and no one looked at it... And overnight here – I post about it, 8 people show up - and it gets adopted the next day." Fred Ni, who blogs at Pound Dogs, talks with the Toronto Standard.
posted by dobbs on Jul 13, 2013 - 55 comments

Moving in stereo

Stereophoto maker lets you make anaglyphs and stereo animated gifs, like these. (You can control the point of focus with your mouse in the flash versions.) Instructions for making it work on a Mac.
posted by klangklangston on Jul 11, 2013 - 8 comments

Drowning World

Photographer Gideon Mendel's stunning portraits of flood victims in the UK, India, Haiti, Pakistan, Australia, and Thailand. (via)
posted by spamandkimchi on Jul 11, 2013 - 2 comments

the scenic route to nowhere

Photographer Dietmar Eckell has taen a series of pictures of wrecked airplanes. It's called "Happy Endings," and no one was killed in any of the 15 crashes.
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jul 10, 2013 - 8 comments

And that's a wrap.

Sam Javanrouh's Toronto-centric photoblog Daily Dose of Imagery (previously 1, 2) called it a day on Friday after a highly-acclaimed 10 year run. [more inside]
posted by The Card Cheat on Jul 6, 2013 - 4 comments

T. rex and guest. Sharktopus and guest.

Photoshopping monsters into your wedding photos is now a thing. It started not that long ago, when a wedding photo featuring a T. rex chasing the wedding party went very, very viral. Now it seems every couple getting married wants a shot of the wedding party fleeing a threat to be pasted in later. From the Maclean's article: "'We're still trying to figure out what goes in the background,' [photographer] Tony [Lombardo] says. 'The couple hasn’t figured out yet what they want to be chased by.'" AT-ATs and Sharktopus have already been done. It's already getting old. Has it already gone too far [via]?
posted by mcwetboy on Jul 6, 2013 - 97 comments

Huh, so that's what it's like to feel like a superhero.

Amazing first-person point-of-view Parkour video filmed in Cambridge, UK.
posted by quin on Jul 5, 2013 - 49 comments

"smoke can add an element of interest to the shot."

To get you ready for Independence Day, National Geographic has provided some useful tips for photographing fireworks, complete with a pretty gallery.
posted by quin on Jul 3, 2013 - 17 comments

It's Hardly Noticeable: anxiety portrayed in photography

John William Keedy is a photographer who was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder 9 years ago. Since then, he's been thinking of thoughts and feelings that are considered not "normal," and he has displayed some of these thoughts in a series of photos titled It’s Hardly Noticeable. Wired's Raw File has larger images and more thoughts from Keedy.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 1, 2013 - 34 comments

I like to look at men… the way they look at women.

[All links probably NSFW] Ingrid Berthon-Moine is a London-based photographer whose latest series Marbles focuses specifically on the testicles of Classical Greek statuary. Hyperallergic asks her why.
posted by shakespeherian on Jul 1, 2013 - 95 comments

Light, Reflection, and Shadow

Diet Wiegman takes using light and darkness to a new level in his sculptures. What may, at first, seem like an abstract composition, often made of mundane recycled items, reveals its amazing secrets when a light is applied. [via]
posted by quin on Jul 1, 2013 - 3 comments

Lynn climbing the Matterhorn.

"This is a story, a picture story, of two very lucky people before whom was spread out the greatest of treasures, the planet Earth. We traveled aboard a magic carpet, the one with the yellow borders, National Geographic magazine. During four decades we wandered over all the continents and left wakes across the seven seas." [more inside]
posted by lazaruslong on Jul 1, 2013 - 9 comments

The Comfortable: “The Torso-twist-with-arm-resting-on-back-of-couch”

Against Author Photos [Part 1.] For Author Photos [Part 2.] by Stephen Burt [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Jun 27, 2013 - 18 comments

selection and preservation that bind humans and apples together

Of Sisters And Clones: An Interview with Jessica Rath
Every apple for sale at your local supermarket is a clone. Every single Golden Delicious, for example, contains the exact same genetic material; though the original Golden Delicious tree (discovered in 1905, on a hillside in Clay County, West Virginia) is now gone, its DNA has become all but immortal, grafted onto an orchard of clones growing on five continents and producing more than two hundred billion pounds of fruit each year in the United States alone.
via Edible Geography [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 20, 2013 - 52 comments

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