857 posts tagged with Poetry.
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Four podcasts with episodes mostly under five minutes long

  • Random Tape is a podcast of random audio recorded by producer David Weinberg.
    (The last two episodes are longer than five minutes. Don't start there.)
  • Sidewalks is a podcast of short interviews and other audio recorded on the sidewalk.
    (The most recent episode is longer than five minutes. Don't start there.)
  • Poetry Now is a podcast of modern poets reading poems, from the Poetry Foundation.
  • Poem of the Day is a podcast of poems from throughout history read by poets and actors, also from the Poetry Foundation.
[more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Dec 7, 2016 - 9 comments

My poore hert bicomen is hermyte

"Today's poem is very simple and is studied by French middle school students as an introduction to Old French." The author is "an unlikely poet" who was born on November 24, 1394, and whose words form the text of Claude Debussy's Trois Chansons de Charles d'Orléans. But he also wrote in Middle English (selections; full text).
posted by Wobbuffet on Nov 24, 2016 - 3 comments

Turned upfield, made a football move

The collected works of Phil Simms, pro football’s poet laureate
posted by Frobenius Twist on Nov 18, 2016 - 7 comments

A poem for lovers, and lovers of science fiction

In 2010, science fiction and fantasy author (and MeFi's own) Tim Pratt wrote "Scientific Romance", a Valentine's Day love poem for his wife.
posted by Room 641-A on Oct 26, 2016 - 2 comments

David Antin, 1932-2016

"So David, when you look up in the sky, do you see poems up there?"
"Not until I put them there."

David Antin died today at 84. [more inside]
posted by roll truck roll on Oct 12, 2016 - 10 comments

Its not eazy being a pedent

The Pedents’ Re-volt
posted by Lexica on Sep 30, 2016 - 38 comments

This Vote Is Legally Binding

Someone always says it, whenever it comes up: "I guess I'm just not allowed to talk to anyone any more!" Well. Yes. It is my duty to inform you we took a vote...
This week's Twitter discussion about how to approach a woman wearing headphones (protip: don't) has now inspired poetry from noted writer and illustrator Ursula Vernon (previously, previously).
posted by sciatrix on Sep 2, 2016 - 98 comments

"Everybody dies with loose ends"

Poet Max Ritvo has died at 25. His "Poem to my Litter" appeared in the New Yorker in June. His debut collection, Four Reincarnations will be published in October by Milkweed Editions.
posted by larrybob on Aug 26, 2016 - 35 comments

Fart Touch

Fart Touch
posted by DoctorFedora on Aug 26, 2016 - 15 comments

My voice is a smallpox blanket

"Bad Indians" a poem by Ryan Red Corn, performed by some Bad Indians. [more inside]
posted by stoneweaver on Aug 22, 2016 - 4 comments

Herald of the infant spring

Poetic Botany is a new exhibition from the New York Botanical Garden devoted to the transformation of botanical science into both verse and illustration. Using examples from nine different plants, the exhibit traces the ramifications of poetic botany for both science and eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century culture. [more inside]
posted by thomas j wise on Aug 16, 2016 - 1 comment

But what I like best of all about my matchbox is that it is an empty one

A letter of thanks for an unusual gift, a poem about a dying queen (with audio of the poet reading it), and a short story about a devoted couple with a shocking secret (with an introduction by Edith Pearlman): all are from the pen of the English novelist, short-story writer, poet, musicologist, translator & biographer; feminist, lesbian & communist Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893-1978). [more inside]
posted by misteraitch on Aug 8, 2016 - 4 comments

minimally trained on public domain poetry

CuratedAI is a literary magazine where the poems and stories are written entirely by machines. For example, there is He Lived with Regret ("He lived with regret at his own table– for his own sake have mercy upon him...") by Tolstoyish, a Recurrent Neural Net trained on the work of Leo Tolstoy. Or Defunct ("defunct and master my god is dead with my love/and the man that i give him") by Deep Gimble I, which is minimally trained on public domain poetry and seeded with a single word.
posted by blahblahblah on Jul 29, 2016 - 13 comments

Clap Clap

seems like folks like us be best
when we broken open
when we melted down
when we easier to digest

On June 26, 2016, author Jason Reynolds accepted two Coretta Scott King author honors for his YA novels All American Boys (co-authored with Brendan Kiely) and The Boy in the Black Suit. For his second acceptance speech, he delivered a call to action poem: Machetes (full text of poem at link). Video. [more inside]
posted by sunset in snow country on Jul 18, 2016 - 4 comments

Queer People Are Magical // Our Secrets are Transformative

BEND Our presence, our ability to live, leaves love notes for the seeds yet to bloom. [more inside]
posted by stoneweaver on Jun 22, 2016 - 6 comments

“Peeing’s queer!” I cried, the modern father’s last lament.

Jacob Bacharach, novelist, writes sonnets about current events and the internet. [more inside]
posted by ennui.bz on Jun 22, 2016 - 1 comment

"I have wasted my life."

How are we to understand the last line of James Wright's famous "Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota?" [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jun 20, 2016 - 46 comments

Every sea of every ruined star

Lytton Strachey, in a sympathetic overview of his life and work, called him the Last Elizabethan. He was morbid, eccentric, and homosexual. His idiosyncratic and macabre style lives somewhere between Shakespeare and Lovecraft. In his short life he composed two complete blank-verse dramas (The Brides' Tragedy and Death's Jest-Book), dozens of shorter fragments, and scores of poems. Today, Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849) is almost completely forgotten.
posted by theodolite on Jun 2, 2016 - 8 comments

"Of Albions glorious Ile the Wonders whilst I write"

Poly-Olbion is a cycle of 30 poems describing England and Wales, county by county, composed by Michael Drayton in the late 16th and early 17th Centuries. It was published in two parts, 1612 and 1622, along with sumptuous black and white maps engraved by William Hole meant to be colored in by its buyers. Now Poly-Olbion will be republished as a coloring book entitled Albions Glorious Ile. The Poly-Olbion Project website is worth exploring, as well as its blog and tumblr.
posted by Kattullus on May 21, 2016 - 7 comments

Tonight I've watched / The moon and then / the Pleiades / go down...

Astronomers crack the secret of this gorgeous poem by Sappho
posted by brundlefly on May 21, 2016 - 25 comments

"The Brontes had their moors, I have my marshes."

It's spring in Wisconsin, and the rivers are running. Time to think of Lorine Niedecker, Wisconsin's austere laborer poet, who lived her whole life in modest circumstances on the shores of Lake Koshkonong, sometimes working as a janitor. From her small home came some of the greatest American poetry , as she lived her complex, but simple, "Life by Water."
posted by SandCounty on May 12, 2016 - 10 comments

"The inside of her head felt slow with panic"

"The Choking Victim" by MeFi's own Alexandra Kleeman is a short story that portrays one new mother's anxiety. The dream-like fiction linked at the author's web site offers a wider perspective on her work. [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Apr 30, 2016 - 1 comment

Manly Health

Diet and fitness advice from Walt Whitman. (SLNYT)
posted by Miko on Apr 29, 2016 - 15 comments

Art is a conversation between you and someone you’ve probably never met

Years With Yoko. For a long time Ono was basically despised, the inevitable lot of someone married to a person whose fame actually may have eclipsed Christ’s. Fools hate foreigners, and fools hate women, but a lot of people who ought to know better hate the avant-garde, and a lot of people who ought to know better hate the politically engaged, and a lot of people who ought to know better hate polymaths, and Ono is all those things. (SLTheMillions) [more inside]
posted by triggerfinger on Apr 27, 2016 - 67 comments

The emotional labor of being brown & queer in the U.S. poetry community

Jennifer Tamayo describes the cost of confronting white supremacy in the U.S. poetry communities, pointing to the emotional, economic, and temporal wages it exacts: "The handling of this poison — the labour to spot and deconstruct instances of capitalist white supremacist cis-hetero-patriarchy at work — is particularly venomous because it performs both personally and systemically." [more inside]
posted by correcaminos on Apr 25, 2016 - 20 comments

“crisis” refers a moment when the body identifies intense danger

“To Become Louder, Even Still”: Responses to Sexual Violence in Literary Spaces Apogee Journal has collected fourteen responses from writers to sexual violence perpetrated in the literary community. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 19, 2016 - 1 comment

"disappearance of the poet, who cedes the initiative to words"

Encrypted is an essay by New Yorker critic Alex Ross about French 19th Century poet Stéphane Mallarmé, and the difficulties he poses for translators and scholars. Notoriously the most bourgeois of avant-garde poets, his life has proved difficult to write about. So perhaps it's best to just go straight for the poetry. The Electronic Poetry Center has a nice page on his late masterpiece, Un Coup de Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard, with the original and several translations.
posted by Kattullus on Apr 17, 2016 - 9 comments

The Djinn of Aiman

The Djinn of Aiman "IT WAS A DIM JANUARY AFTERNOON IN LAHORE, there was a power outage on Zahoor Elahi Road, and Farida Khanum had finally woken up. We were sitting among shadows on the floor of her living room: I on the carpet and she on a cushion that was at once a mark of her prestige (she is “The Queen of Ghazal,” the last of her generation’s iconic classically trained singers) and advanced age (she can no longer sit as she used to, like a mermaid, with her legs folded beguilingly beneath her). I had come to prepare Khanum for a concert she was to give in a week’s time in Calcutta, and was trying to engage her, in this fragile early phase of her day, with innocuous-sounding questions: which ghazals was she planning on singing there, and in what order?
posted by dhruva on Apr 13, 2016 - 2 comments

That's a beauty.

Tom Waits reads "The Laughing Heart" by Charles Bukowski (SLYT)
posted by exogenous on Apr 13, 2016 - 8 comments

The Road Home

“Treated right, poems don't just ‘work’ on radio, they can rock your world.” The Road Home, Bob Chelmick’s weekly broadcast of poetry and music, is perfect for winding down on Sunday night (and do male voices get more relaxing?). Each month the Road Home website cycles through 27 hours of past shows (playlist). Or listen to the live program on Sundays at 8-10 pm MST via the CKUA website. About Bob Chelmick.
posted by sylvanshine on Apr 10, 2016 - 4 comments

So Much Is Said By Saying Nothing

“Déjeuner du Matin” (YouTube), a short film adaptation of Jacques Prévert's poem about the last moments of a relationship. [more inside]
posted by chinesefood on Apr 6, 2016 - 9 comments

The language of flowers, spoken in forms around the world

In the Victorian Era, "the language of flowers" (floriography) was all the rage. According to The Smithsonian Gardens History in Bloom summary (and activities sheets) for The Language of Flowers (PDF), "Nearly all Victorian homes would own at least one of the guide books dedicated to the ‘language of flowers.’ The authors of these guidebooks used visual and verbal analogies, religious and literary sources, folkloric connections, and botanical attributes to derive the various associations for the flowers." But where did it come from? (Google books preview) Istanbul in the Tulip Age (PDF, first chapter of Crime and Punishment in Istanbul: 1700-1800), and Turkish love-letters and harems ... somewhat. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 1, 2016 - 8 comments

April Is The Cruelest Month / At The Oooold Baaaall Gaaaaaame!

Poems to Celebrate the National Pastime. Opening Day for Major League Baseball's 2016 season is just around the corner, and today begins National Poetry Month. Celebrate both with a selection of fine baseball verse from the Editors at poetry.org. [more inside]
posted by magstheaxe on Apr 1, 2016 - 16 comments

Is This the End of the Era of the Important, Inappropriate Literary Man?

"I talked to a woman who asked for anonymity because she’s still associated professionally with the University of Iowa. 'When I got to Iowa,' she told me, 'I was like, who the fuck are these people? And where are the adults?'" Jia Tolentino on Thomas Sayers Ellis, VIDA, and the "tradition" of bad behavior from powerful men in the creative fields.
posted by cudzoo on Mar 28, 2016 - 28 comments

Poet & Novelist Jim Harrison has died.

Excellent 1986 interview from the Paris Review. [more inside]
posted by jferngler on Mar 27, 2016 - 39 comments

It's never to late to be a student of poetry: 20th National Poetry Month

This April is the 20th National Poetry Month in the United States and there are many ways to celebrate. Here is the 2016 Multimedia "Dear Poet" project call to students and teachers to learn more about poetry. Here are the 2015 instructions. [more inside]
posted by CMcG on Mar 26, 2016 - 4 comments

Not much writing, oddly

Evan "The Nerdwriter" Puschak examines How Hitchcock Blocks a Scene. [more inside]
posted by ChurchHatesTucker on Mar 23, 2016 - 13 comments

Four Victorian Songs Analyzed by Joanna Swafford

Songs of the Victorians is a website about four songs composed in Victorian England. The history behind them reveals forgotten details of the era: Juanita was composed by Caroline Norton, a pioneering feminist; The Lost Chord was a poem by Adelaide Anne Procter first published in a feminist journal, then set to music by (yes that) Arthur Sullivan; a part of Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem Maud, which employs the cryptographical language of flowers, is set to music by Michael William Balfe and Sir Arthur Somervell, the former allowing performers to disguise or emphasize the disturbed emotions of the original, the latter makes the mental distress plain. The website was designed by digital humanities blogger and professor Joanna Swafford as a prototype for Augmented Notes, a system for highlighting sheet music visually while playing a sound file.
posted by Kattullus on Mar 4, 2016 - 10 comments

Your Revolution

Your Revolution by Sarah Jones. Alternate version with production by DJ Vadim. [more inside]
posted by juv3nal on Mar 1, 2016 - 2 comments

"Be prepared to burn."

To Black Girls Everywhere by Linda Chavers
posted by Fizz on Feb 24, 2016 - 5 comments

Shrewsbury clock: A portmanteau

A mental coffee break, so to speak. I quite like Rimbshot and Dogs and Cats, among others. Oh, and Reasons, because he is describing our cat.
posted by BWA on Feb 24, 2016 - 4 comments

The unlikely and awesome rise of punk, anarchist, and hacker

Birgitta Jónsdóttir May Be Iceland's Next Prime Minister - "Poetry told Birgitta that she is alive. The internet taught her that she belongs in this world. The crisis showed her that she has a role to play, and politics showed her that everything needs to change." (Jónsdóttir, WikiLeaks & Iceland, previously) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Feb 7, 2016 - 36 comments

LUXE ET VERITAS

Frederick Seidel’s poems of age and experience. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 2, 2016 - 4 comments

I am a slut.

I am a slut. SLYT A slam poem from Savannah Brown
posted by 922257033c4a0f3cecdbd819a46d626999d1af4a on Jan 26, 2016 - 13 comments

“When one burns one's bridges, what a very nice fire it makes.”

No trolls allowed: Seattle advertises a writing residency … in a bridge. by Marta Bausells [The Guardian] The US city’s transport department offers $10,000 for a ‘unique’ residency in a bridge tower – in return for ‘an in-depth exploration’ of the space.
“The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS), in partnership with Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) seeks a practicing, published poet, fiction, or creative non-fiction writer for a unique project-based artist residency in the northwest tower of the Fremont Bridge. The selected writer will undertake an in-depth exploration of the bridge and write a piece in response to the experience.”
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jan 21, 2016 - 48 comments

A Beautiful Theorem Deserves a Beautiful Proof

Douglas Hofstadter presents a proof Napoleon's theorem (on equilateral triangles constructed on the sides of another triangle), in the form of a sonnet. (Part of a longer talk; the link should take you to 34:18 in the video.)
posted by Wolfdog on Jan 9, 2016 - 7 comments

The cupcake is malevolent.

"Being a fascist collaborator has never tasted so sweet.": Performance artist Penny Arcade on cupcakes and New York City at the Poetry Project's 2016 New Year's Day marathon benefit reading.
posted by frumiousb on Jan 2, 2016 - 10 comments

Themed Guides to Translated Literature in 2015

Chad W. Post at Three Percent recently linked to World Literature Today's 75 Notable Translations of 2015 and went on a list-making tear to provide more structure and commentary: 7 books by women, 6 water-cooler fiction books, 6 university press books, 3 'funny' books, 4 books from underrepresented countries, and the best poetry I should read. The commentary often leads to further matters of interest, e.g. the Women in Translation Tumblr or Marianne Fritz and the translation challenges (scroll down) in her work.
posted by Wobbuffet on Dec 31, 2015 - 7 comments

Of Paris, of Love, of Art, of Cats and Poetry and of Death.

NSFW - Lucie Badoud, model and muse a well off orphan was inspired by Guillaume Apollinaire's novel La Femme Assise and went to Paris. In 1924 now known as Youki - snow rose, she received on her 21st birthday from Foujita, the japanese painter, a big, yellow Ballot with a Basque chauffeur.
The car's body was by Saoutchik and the radiator was capped with a bronze by Rodin; The Man With a Broken Nose. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Dec 28, 2015 - 4 comments

What poet should I fight?

the short answer is: every poet. but here’s a brief (ok, that’s a lie. this is really long) list i typed up during accounting instead of learning about accounting for inter-corporate investments
posted by sciatrix on Dec 13, 2015 - 41 comments

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