844 posts tagged with Poetry.
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Clap Clap

seems like folks like us be best
when we broken open
when we melted down
when we easier to digest

On June 26, 2016, author Jason Reynolds accepted two Coretta Scott King author honors for his YA novels All American Boys (co-authored with Brendan Kiely) and The Boy in the Black Suit. For his second acceptance speech, he delivered a call to action poem: Machetes (full text of poem at link). Video. [more inside]
posted by sunset in snow country on Jul 18, 2016 - 4 comments

Queer People Are Magical // Our Secrets are Transformative

BEND Our presence, our ability to live, leaves love notes for the seeds yet to bloom. [more inside]
posted by stoneweaver on Jun 22, 2016 - 6 comments

“Peeing’s queer!” I cried, the modern father’s last lament.

Jacob Bacharach, novelist, writes sonnets about current events and the internet. [more inside]
posted by ennui.bz on Jun 22, 2016 - 1 comment

"I have wasted my life."

How are we to understand the last line of James Wright's famous "Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota?" [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Jun 20, 2016 - 46 comments

Every sea of every ruined star

Lytton Strachey, in a sympathetic overview of his life and work, called him the Last Elizabethan. He was morbid, eccentric, and homosexual. His idiosyncratic and macabre style lives somewhere between Shakespeare and Lovecraft. In his short life he composed two complete blank-verse dramas (The Brides' Tragedy and Death's Jest-Book), dozens of shorter fragments, and scores of poems. Today, Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1849) is almost completely forgotten.
posted by theodolite on Jun 2, 2016 - 8 comments

"Of Albions glorious Ile the Wonders whilst I write"

Poly-Olbion is a cycle of 30 poems describing England and Wales, county by county, composed by Michael Drayton in the late 16th and early 17th Centuries. It was published in two parts, 1612 and 1622, along with sumptuous black and white maps engraved by William Hole meant to be colored in by its buyers. Now Poly-Olbion will be republished as a coloring book entitled Albions Glorious Ile. The Poly-Olbion Project website is worth exploring, as well as its blog and tumblr.
posted by Kattullus on May 21, 2016 - 7 comments

Tonight I've watched / The moon and then / the Pleiades / go down...

Astronomers crack the secret of this gorgeous poem by Sappho
posted by brundlefly on May 21, 2016 - 25 comments

"The Brontes had their moors, I have my marshes."

It's spring in Wisconsin, and the rivers are running. Time to think of Lorine Niedecker, Wisconsin's austere laborer poet, who lived her whole life in modest circumstances on the shores of Lake Koshkonong, sometimes working as a janitor. From her small home came some of the greatest American poetry , as she lived her complex, but simple, "Life by Water."
posted by SandCounty on May 12, 2016 - 10 comments

"The inside of her head felt slow with panic"

"The Choking Victim" by MeFi's own Alexandra Kleeman is a short story that portrays one new mother's anxiety. The dream-like fiction linked at the author's web site offers a wider perspective on her work. [more inside]
posted by Wobbuffet on Apr 30, 2016 - 1 comment

Manly Health

Diet and fitness advice from Walt Whitman. (SLNYT)
posted by Miko on Apr 29, 2016 - 15 comments

Art is a conversation between you and someone you’ve probably never met

Years With Yoko. For a long time Ono was basically despised, the inevitable lot of someone married to a person whose fame actually may have eclipsed Christ’s. Fools hate foreigners, and fools hate women, but a lot of people who ought to know better hate the avant-garde, and a lot of people who ought to know better hate the politically engaged, and a lot of people who ought to know better hate polymaths, and Ono is all those things. (SLTheMillions) [more inside]
posted by triggerfinger on Apr 27, 2016 - 67 comments

The emotional labor of being brown & queer in the U.S. poetry community

Jennifer Tamayo describes the cost of confronting white supremacy in the U.S. poetry communities, pointing to the emotional, economic, and temporal wages it exacts: "The handling of this poison — the labour to spot and deconstruct instances of capitalist white supremacist cis-hetero-patriarchy at work — is particularly venomous because it performs both personally and systemically." [more inside]
posted by correcaminos on Apr 25, 2016 - 20 comments

“crisis” refers a moment when the body identifies intense danger

“To Become Louder, Even Still”: Responses to Sexual Violence in Literary Spaces Apogee Journal has collected fourteen responses from writers to sexual violence perpetrated in the literary community. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Apr 19, 2016 - 1 comment

"disappearance of the poet, who cedes the initiative to words"

Encrypted is an essay by New Yorker critic Alex Ross about French 19th Century poet Stéphane Mallarmé, and the difficulties he poses for translators and scholars. Notoriously the most bourgeois of avant-garde poets, his life has proved difficult to write about. So perhaps it's best to just go straight for the poetry. The Electronic Poetry Center has a nice page on his late masterpiece, Un Coup de Dés Jamais N'Abolira Le Hasard, with the original and several translations.
posted by Kattullus on Apr 17, 2016 - 9 comments

The Djinn of Aiman

The Djinn of Aiman "IT WAS A DIM JANUARY AFTERNOON IN LAHORE, there was a power outage on Zahoor Elahi Road, and Farida Khanum had finally woken up. We were sitting among shadows on the floor of her living room: I on the carpet and she on a cushion that was at once a mark of her prestige (she is “The Queen of Ghazal,” the last of her generation’s iconic classically trained singers) and advanced age (she can no longer sit as she used to, like a mermaid, with her legs folded beguilingly beneath her). I had come to prepare Khanum for a concert she was to give in a week’s time in Calcutta, and was trying to engage her, in this fragile early phase of her day, with innocuous-sounding questions: which ghazals was she planning on singing there, and in what order?
posted by dhruva on Apr 13, 2016 - 2 comments

That's a beauty.

Tom Waits reads "The Laughing Heart" by Charles Bukowski (SLYT)
posted by exogenous on Apr 13, 2016 - 8 comments

The Road Home

“Treated right, poems don't just ‘work’ on radio, they can rock your world.” The Road Home, Bob Chelmick’s weekly broadcast of poetry and music, is perfect for winding down on Sunday night (and do male voices get more relaxing?). Each month the Road Home website cycles through 27 hours of past shows (playlist). Or listen to the live program on Sundays at 8-10 pm MST via the CKUA website. About Bob Chelmick.
posted by sylvanshine on Apr 10, 2016 - 4 comments

So Much Is Said By Saying Nothing

“Déjeuner du Matin” (YouTube), a short film adaptation of Jacques Prévert's poem about the last moments of a relationship. [more inside]
posted by chinesefood on Apr 6, 2016 - 9 comments

The language of flowers, spoken in forms around the world

In the Victorian Era, "the language of flowers" (floriography) was all the rage. According to The Smithsonian Gardens History in Bloom summary (and activities sheets) for The Language of Flowers (PDF), "Nearly all Victorian homes would own at least one of the guide books dedicated to the ‘language of flowers.’ The authors of these guidebooks used visual and verbal analogies, religious and literary sources, folkloric connections, and botanical attributes to derive the various associations for the flowers." But where did it come from? (Google books preview) Istanbul in the Tulip Age (PDF, first chapter of Crime and Punishment in Istanbul: 1700-1800), and Turkish love-letters and harems ... somewhat. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 1, 2016 - 8 comments

April Is The Cruelest Month / At The Oooold Baaaall Gaaaaaame!

Poems to Celebrate the National Pastime. Opening Day for Major League Baseball's 2016 season is just around the corner, and today begins National Poetry Month. Celebrate both with a selection of fine baseball verse from the Editors at poetry.org. [more inside]
posted by magstheaxe on Apr 1, 2016 - 16 comments

Is This the End of the Era of the Important, Inappropriate Literary Man?

"I talked to a woman who asked for anonymity because she’s still associated professionally with the University of Iowa. 'When I got to Iowa,' she told me, 'I was like, who the fuck are these people? And where are the adults?'" Jia Tolentino on Thomas Sayers Ellis, VIDA, and the "tradition" of bad behavior from powerful men in the creative fields.
posted by cudzoo on Mar 28, 2016 - 28 comments

Poet & Novelist Jim Harrison has died.

Excellent 1986 interview from the Paris Review. [more inside]
posted by jferngler on Mar 27, 2016 - 39 comments

It's never to late to be a student of poetry: 20th National Poetry Month

This April is the 20th National Poetry Month in the United States and there are many ways to celebrate. Here is the 2016 Multimedia "Dear Poet" project call to students and teachers to learn more about poetry. Here are the 2015 instructions. [more inside]
posted by CMcG on Mar 26, 2016 - 4 comments

Not much writing, oddly

Evan "The Nerdwriter" Puschak examines How Hitchcock Blocks a Scene. [more inside]
posted by ChurchHatesTucker on Mar 23, 2016 - 13 comments

Four Victorian Songs Analyzed by Joanna Swafford

Songs of the Victorians is a website about four songs composed in Victorian England. The history behind them reveals forgotten details of the era: Juanita was composed by Caroline Norton, a pioneering feminist; The Lost Chord was a poem by Adelaide Anne Procter first published in a feminist journal, then set to music by (yes that) Arthur Sullivan; a part of Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem Maud, which employs the cryptographical language of flowers, is set to music by Michael William Balfe and Sir Arthur Somervell, the former allowing performers to disguise or emphasize the disturbed emotions of the original, the latter makes the mental distress plain. The website was designed by digital humanities blogger and professor Joanna Swafford as a prototype for Augmented Notes, a system for highlighting sheet music visually while playing a sound file.
posted by Kattullus on Mar 4, 2016 - 10 comments

Your Revolution

Your Revolution by Sarah Jones. Alternate version with production by DJ Vadim. [more inside]
posted by juv3nal on Mar 1, 2016 - 2 comments

"Be prepared to burn."

To Black Girls Everywhere by Linda Chavers
posted by Fizz on Feb 24, 2016 - 5 comments

Shrewsbury clock: A portmanteau

A mental coffee break, so to speak. I quite like Rimbshot and Dogs and Cats, among others. Oh, and Reasons, because he is describing our cat.
posted by BWA on Feb 24, 2016 - 4 comments

The unlikely and awesome rise of punk, anarchist, and hacker

Birgitta Jónsdóttir May Be Iceland's Next Prime Minister - "Poetry told Birgitta that she is alive. The internet taught her that she belongs in this world. The crisis showed her that she has a role to play, and politics showed her that everything needs to change." (Jónsdóttir, WikiLeaks & Iceland, previously) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Feb 7, 2016 - 36 comments

LUXE ET VERITAS

Frederick Seidel’s poems of age and experience. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Feb 2, 2016 - 4 comments

I am a slut.

I am a slut. SLYT A slam poem from Savannah Brown
posted by 922257033c4a0f3cecdbd819a46d626999d1af4a on Jan 26, 2016 - 13 comments

“When one burns one's bridges, what a very nice fire it makes.”

No trolls allowed: Seattle advertises a writing residency … in a bridge. by Marta Bausells [The Guardian] The US city’s transport department offers $10,000 for a ‘unique’ residency in a bridge tower – in return for ‘an in-depth exploration’ of the space.
“The Seattle Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS), in partnership with Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) seeks a practicing, published poet, fiction, or creative non-fiction writer for a unique project-based artist residency in the northwest tower of the Fremont Bridge. The selected writer will undertake an in-depth exploration of the bridge and write a piece in response to the experience.”
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jan 21, 2016 - 48 comments

A Beautiful Theorem Deserves a Beautiful Proof

Douglas Hofstadter presents a proof Napoleon's theorem (on equilateral triangles constructed on the sides of another triangle), in the form of a sonnet. (Part of a longer talk; the link should take you to 34:18 in the video.)
posted by Wolfdog on Jan 9, 2016 - 7 comments

The cupcake is malevolent.

"Being a fascist collaborator has never tasted so sweet.": Performance artist Penny Arcade on cupcakes and New York City at the Poetry Project's 2016 New Year's Day marathon benefit reading.
posted by frumiousb on Jan 2, 2016 - 10 comments

Themed Guides to Translated Literature in 2015

Chad W. Post at Three Percent recently linked to World Literature Today's 75 Notable Translations of 2015 and went on a list-making tear to provide more structure and commentary: 7 books by women, 6 water-cooler fiction books, 6 university press books, 3 'funny' books, 4 books from underrepresented countries, and the best poetry I should read. The commentary often leads to further matters of interest, e.g. the Women in Translation Tumblr or Marianne Fritz and the translation challenges (scroll down) in her work.
posted by Wobbuffet on Dec 31, 2015 - 7 comments

Of Paris, of Love, of Art, of Cats and Poetry and of Death.

NSFW - Lucie Badoud, model and muse a well off orphan was inspired by Guillaume Apollinaire's novel La Femme Assise and went to Paris. In 1924 now known as Youki - snow rose, she received on her 21st birthday from Foujita, the japanese painter, a big, yellow Ballot with a Basque chauffeur.
The car's body was by Saoutchik and the radiator was capped with a bronze by Rodin; The Man With a Broken Nose. [more inside]
posted by adamvasco on Dec 28, 2015 - 4 comments

What poet should I fight?

the short answer is: every poet. but here’s a brief (ok, that’s a lie. this is really long) list i typed up during accounting instead of learning about accounting for inter-corporate investments
posted by sciatrix on Dec 13, 2015 - 41 comments

Necrokitty Comic Sans

When the pet crematorium sends her poems purporting to be from her dead cat, Hannah Chutzpah responds in poetry. (And are you sure this is from her? / Only I think her scansion would be better)
posted by Jeanne on Dec 13, 2015 - 18 comments

"A bold race bred there, battle-happy men causing trouble & torment"

“So at Christmas in this court I lay down a challenge: / If a person here present, within these premises, / Is big or bold or red-blooded enough / To strike me one stroke and be struck in return, / I shall give him a gift of this gigantic cleaver / and the axe shall be his to handle how he likes. / I'll kneel, bare my neck and take the first knock. / So who has the gall? The gumption? The guts? / Who’ll spring from his seat and snatch this weapon? / I offer the axe — who’ll have it as his own? / I’ll afford one free hit from which I won't flinch, / and promised that 12 months will pass in peace, / then claim / the duty I deserve in one year and one day. / Does no one have the nerve to wager in this way? [more inside]
posted by Pirate-Bartender-Zombie-Monkey on Dec 10, 2015 - 14 comments

What do you call a pair of flying dinosaurs?

It's rare that a comments section is more entertaining than the post or article to which it is attached, but this post comes with a garden of delightful double dactyl verse dedicated to Benedict Cumberbatch. [more inside]
posted by Wretch729 on Dec 3, 2015 - 19 comments

"Had we ten Hands . . ."

In 1739, an English washer-woman named Mary Collier published a long poem called "The Woman's Labour" about the difficulties faced by working women. Her poem was a response to The Thresher's Labour by Stephen Duck, which mocked the poetic conceit that agricultural workers spend a pleasant time in nature, and took a few pot shots at women along the way: "Ah! were their Hands so active as their Tongues/ How nimbly then would move the Rakes and Prongs?" Collier refutes Duck's criticisms and describes women's added labour: [more inside]
posted by yarntheory on Dec 2, 2015 - 11 comments

Somewhere in America

Three young women, part of a literacy project called Get Lit, drop a powerful message on Queen Latifah's talk show. (TW: mentions of sexual assault, racism, assault)
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering on Nov 9, 2015 - 4 comments

“It’s clearly possible and highly probable..”

Chile admits Pablo Neruda might have been murdered by Pinochet regime. [The Guardian]
The interior ministry released a statement on Thursday amid press reports that Neruda might not have died of cancer as previously believed. The statement acknowledged a ministry document dated March of this year, which was published by the newspaper El Pais in Spain. “It’s clearly possible and highly probable that a third party” was responsible for Neruda’s death, the document said.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Nov 7, 2015 - 22 comments

I envy you, being a librarian.

Down Cemetery Road (1964), from the BBC Monitor series, in which Larkin was interviewed by John Betjeman. - A casual conversation that halts and resumes in Larkinland. [more inside]
posted by unliteral on Oct 27, 2015 - 3 comments

Digital poetry - Leaving the ivory tower

The challenge: if people would only know, hear, and see what poets did, then at least some of them would realize too how cool literature can actually be. - Three projects which engage in popularizing, mediating, and digitally archiving contemporary Hungarian poetry. [more inside]
posted by Wolfdog on Oct 25, 2015 - 0 comments

I Am Somebody.

"I am somebody. I am God's child. I may not have a job, but I am somebody. I may be Black, but I am somebody. I may not have an education, but I am somebody. You may not respect me, but I am somebody. I may be a Puerto Rican, but I am somebody. I may be an Indian and my land was stolen, but I am somebody." The history of the chant. [more inside]
posted by thetortoise on Oct 20, 2015 - 1 comment

Vetch

Vetch (dropbox PDF link) is the first known literary journal for transgender poets and prose writers.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 19, 2015 - 6 comments

In Search of 'Desiderata'

"Desiderata" is a 1927 poem by Max Ehrmann. It's been subjected to misattribution and mutation (the second Google result is a typo-ridden version that's lurked on a .edu site since 1996 and substitutes "Neither be critical about love" for "Neither be cynical about love" and "Be careful" for "Be cheerful". Even Snopes prints a version with "careful" rather than "cheerful.) Daniel Nester digs into the history of the poem in a piece published on the website of the Poetry Foundation.
posted by larrybob on Oct 15, 2015 - 64 comments

I am now nineteen years old. I am now tired.

An untitled poem from NLU Delhi's student newspaper. Trigger warnings for rape, sexual abuse, and pedophilia.
posted by jbickers on Sep 27, 2015 - 13 comments

The Ballad of Steinbjørn Jacobsen

I Sing for You an Apple is an account by writer and translator Eric Wilson of "escorting a Faroese poet-hero around the USA" in 1978. The poet-hero from the Faroe Islands was Steinbjørn Berghamar Jacobsen, who wrote fiction, poetry, plays and children's books in the language of his North-Atlantic archipelago. His works have not been translated into English, but they have been set to music. On Tinna og Tám he reads his own poems, accompanied by Kristian Blak and Heðin Ziska Davidsen (YouTube: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 ). And after his passing in 2012, two of his children, Kári and Eyð Jacobsen, made an album, Tungl, where they turned his poems into indie songs (YouTube: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).
posted by Kattullus on Sep 24, 2015 - 3 comments

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