410 posts tagged with Poverty.
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Boston students bury those with no one to witness

NPR covers Boston-area students who attend the funerals of those with no one to witness. In a time when a lot of our interactions are fueled by fear or blunted by avoidance of perceived risk, it can be hard to reach out to those with nothing. Students in their senior year at the Roxbury Latin school attend the funerals -- and act as pallbearers -- for those who have no one. A local funeral home, Lawler and Crosby, handles the other details. [more inside]
posted by wenestvedt on Jan 27, 2016 - 35 comments

10 things to know about progress in international development

10 things to know about progress in international development (.pdf) Around the world, amazing progress is being made. More than 1 billion people have been lifted out of extreme poverty since 1990, with major gains made in health and education and in other areas that contribute to human well-being.

Lots of problems remain of course. And you can still be very poor and not be below the $1.25 (in $2005) line. But a big deal.
posted by hawthorne on Jan 23, 2016 - 9 comments

I've Always Been Hungry

Growing up poor, there were times when I only ate what I could manage to steal. As a well-fed adult, I still can’t turn down a good meal…or a bad one. This moving memoir piece is by Zen monk and author Barry Graham, who also blogs at No Mean Preacher.
posted by katie on Jan 19, 2016 - 22 comments

All Hollowed Out

The lonely poverty of America's white working class. (slAtlantic)
posted by Kitteh on Jan 18, 2016 - 73 comments

Where "schools aren’t a place to learn, they’re a place to fear."

In 2007, the Pinellas County, Florida School Board abandoned integration, joining hundreds of US school districts in former Confederacy states that have resegregated since 2000. The Board justified the vote with bold promises: Schools in poor, black neighborhoods would get more money, more staff, more resources -- none of which happened. This past August, the Tampa Bay Times published an exposé, revealing how district leaders turned five once-average schools into Failure Factories. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 18, 2015 - 62 comments

Tent City, America

Tent cities are now so common that advocates are campaigning to make them semi-permanent settlements of micro-housing. But is this a genuine solution or merely a quick fix? Chris Herring for Places Journal.
posted by porn in the woods on Dec 16, 2015 - 93 comments

Outsourcing, exploitation and the new reality of work

As you read this story you will recognise that the economic system that continues to keep black people very, very poor in this country has been broken for so long, and the private sector has been so strong for so long, that we have a vast imbalance that has been allowed to flourish unchecked. We the people have not been demanding when it comes to scrutiny of corporate conduct. [...] This story – this one you will read about Coca-Cola - is part of a rich canon. It exists because of First and Gqabi and Nxumalo and Jaffer and countless others.
via [more inside]
posted by infini on Dec 10, 2015 - 2 comments

Steve Albini essay

Why I Haven't Had a Conventional Christmas in 20 Years
posted by josher71 on Nov 23, 2015 - 30 comments

How The Bronx Came Back (But Didn't Bring Everyone Along)

The New York borough that once symbolized urban decline is safer and more stable—but most Bronxites' lives are still precarious.
posted by poffin boffin on Nov 20, 2015 - 21 comments

It Was Not To Be.

America's Poorest White Town: Abandoned by Coal, Swallowed by Drugs. The first in a series of dispatches from America's poorest towns by the Guardian.
posted by Atreides on Nov 13, 2015 - 44 comments

economics decide the contest, and wealth wins every time

"The number of people living in poverty in Portland’s suburbs shot up almost 100 percent between 2000 and 2011, according to the Brookings Institute. If the North’s poor black residents are driven to the same poverty in less desirable areas, then the Portland Boheme for middle-class whites has been purchased at a price of cultural disruption and displacement, even violence. And while immigration to cozier, comfortable climes, and gentrification and attendant displacement are not new phenomena, I find that people flocking Portland-ward rarely wish to accept their own culpability or complicity in this story—there is a desire on behalf of most newcomers to think of themselves as socially progressive and so properly enlightened, as if being anti-racist or super-considerate and well-meaning, responsible even, somehow makes this process of ‘urban renewal’ consequence-less and clean. It is not." Michael Copperman, La Boheme Portlandia.
posted by everybody had matching towels on Nov 12, 2015 - 73 comments

The Life & Times of Strider Wolf

The Life & Times of Strider Wolf Trigger warnings for Violence, Child Abuse.
posted by Chrischris on Nov 11, 2015 - 10 comments

A Handout Is The Best Hand Up

A generation of evidence affirms cash transfers as among the most powerful means of eliminating extreme poverty in the world. Transfers of money, along with transfers of food vouchers, have seen Brazilian inequality plummet alongside the numbers of the very poor.
posted by blankdawn on Nov 9, 2015 - 46 comments

Broken

"San Bernardino is the poorest city of its size in California, mired in its fourth year of bankruptcy. Industries left, the middle class shrank, the working poor struggle to rise and the destitute fall. Yet there are people in San Bernardino who work tirelessly to resurrect the city for the next generations. Although their paths are different, their trajectories meet at the same question — can San Bernardino be saved?"
A slow, powerful documentary by photojournalist Liz O. Baylen about a sad, desperate city not far from here.
posted by growabrain on Nov 8, 2015 - 20 comments

“This year it’s more of a state-specific story,”

We Mapped the Uninsured. You'll Notice a Pattern. By Quoctrung Bui and Margot Sanger-Katz [The New York Times]
Two years into the health care law, clear regional patterns are emerging about who has health insurance in America and who still doesn’t. The remaining uninsured are primarily in the South and the Southwest. They tend to be poor. They tend to live in Republican-leaning states. The rates of people without insurance in the Northeast and the upper Midwest have fallen into the single digits since the Affordable Care Act’s main provisions kicked in. But in many parts of the country, obtaining health insurance is still a problem for many Americans.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Nov 1, 2015 - 33 comments

Poor White Boys Finish Last

BBC: "If you're white, male and poor enough to qualify for a free meal at school then you face the toughest challenge when starting out in life. That's what the Equality and Human Right Commission (EHRC) has said in "the most comprehensive review ever carried out on progress towards greater equality in Britain"."
posted by marienbad on Oct 30, 2015 - 80 comments

The Color of Debt: How Collection Suits Squeeze Black Neighborhoods

The Color of Debt: How Collection Suits Squeeze Black Neighborhoods — a ProPublica investigation into racial disparities in debt collection lawsuits [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Oct 21, 2015 - 16 comments

The lowest rung of the housing ladder?

"A growing number of people on low incomes are now living in shared housing - known as "houses in multiple occupation" - where each room is rented separately. But there's concern that many tenants are living in poor conditions." [SLBBC]
posted by marienbad on Oct 21, 2015 - 56 comments

Most people have an inaccurate assessment of who is "on welfare."

The mayor of Lewiston, Maine recently made headlines when he called for the state to publish the name and address of anyone receiving welfare benefits. The idea of publicly shaming people for receiving government assistance is not new. But when these stories do arise, we rarely stop to think about what we mean when we say someone is "on welfare." In 1983, Mimi Abramovitz tackled that question head-on in a paper provocatively titled "Everyone is on Welfare." Almost 20 years later, she updated the paper for the new millennium. (Also available on Researchgate). [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Oct 20, 2015 - 73 comments

I Am Somebody.

"I am somebody. I am God's child. I may not have a job, but I am somebody. I may be Black, but I am somebody. I may not have an education, but I am somebody. You may not respect me, but I am somebody. I may be a Puerto Rican, but I am somebody. I may be an Indian and my land was stolen, but I am somebody." The history of the chant. [more inside]
posted by thetortoise on Oct 20, 2015 - 1 comment

"What happened to Lane is illegal."

"A BuzzFeed News investigation into Texas judicial practice found that with no public defenders present, traffic court judges routinely flout the law, locking up people for days, weeks, and sometimes even months because they did not pay fines they could not afford. The result is a modern-day version of debtors prison, an institution that was common two centuries ago but has been outlawed since the early ’70s."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Oct 8, 2015 - 45 comments

Alarmingly high proportions

"There's a popular narrative about poor families and fast food: They eat more of it than anybody else. It’s dangled as evidence for the high rate of obesity among poorer Americans -- and talked about even by some of the country’s foremost voices on food. "[J]unk food is cheaper when measured by the calorie, and that this makes fast food essential for the poor because they need cheap calories," wrote Mark Bittman for The New York Times in 2011 But there’s a problem with saying that poor people like fast food better than others. It’s not true."
posted by almostmanda on Sep 21, 2015 - 37 comments

Pay them their goddamn money.

Broke: A moving essay about poverty, fairness, and college football.
posted by rouftop on Sep 8, 2015 - 29 comments

It can't happen here

How over a million American families live on $2 per day, by Dylan Matthews, VOX [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Sep 5, 2015 - 46 comments

That Lonely Section of Hell

Former Vancouver Police detective Lori Shenher's book, That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer who Almost Got Away, is a memoir about investigating the disappearances of women who would turn out to have been murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton. The Globe and Mail has published an excerpt here. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Sep 5, 2015 - 34 comments

The Heart Of Football Beats In Aliquippa

Over five decades of economic decline and racial conflict, a Western Pennsylvania mill town has found unity and hope on the football field. "There is no drug dealing at the Pit, and rarely any violence," Walker says. "It really is sacred ground; it's like a miracle. You've got guys that, any other time of the day, they're going to try and rip each other's throats out, but they just walk past each other in the Pit. They're there to watch those kids play."
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 1, 2015 - 5 comments

No White Flags

"The hurricane lives in a complicated place. Everyone's experience is both communal and personal, obvious and hidden. The memory of the death is everywhere, buried in shallow and temporary graves." (SL Longform ESPN)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 26, 2015 - 5 comments

What do the poor need? Try asking them.

To improve poor neighborhoods, the people who live there must have a hand in deciding their own fate. That approach works well in Houston, where one program has enabled hundreds of thousands of poor residents, many of them immigrants, to move up the ladder of economic and educational opportunity each year. It’s a strategy that can — and should — be implemented nationwide. [more inside]
posted by storybored on Aug 9, 2015 - 16 comments

I deserve not to worry

Only a few weeks after becoming an independent media company, This American Life covers "The Problem We All Live With" -- namely, why desegregation is still the only proven way to improve bad schools, and what happens when one school district accidentally has to attempt it.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Aug 4, 2015 - 59 comments

The Earth, our home, is beginning to look like an immense pile of filth

This is an extract from Pope Francis’s encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si. Here are some of the early analyses.
posted by infini on Jun 18, 2015 - 86 comments

Black lives matter in elections

If black lives were as long lived as those of whites, some major elections may have turned out differently. From the article: "The unspoken suggestion is that Republicans know this and will oppose programs that increase Black health and decrease Black poverty in part for the same reasons that they have favored incarceration and permanent disenfranchisement of people convicted of felonies."
posted by batbat on Jun 15, 2015 - 37 comments

Poverty is the Worst Kind of Violence

How do they make such a decision? By engaging The American tradition of separating the poor into two, mutually exclusive categories: those who deserve to be poor, and those who don't. More here, here, and here. [more inside]
posted by 4ster on Jun 1, 2015 - 75 comments

That Thing You Dew

How Mountain Dew Came to Perpetuate a Deep-Seated Appalachian Stereotype As Mountain Dew taps into tropes of corn-syrup-free authenticity and nostalgia for "backwoods" "renegades" and "rebels" with its throwback drink Dewshine, a daughter of Appalachia considers how the beverage reflects cultural stereotypes. [more inside]
posted by Miko on May 22, 2015 - 100 comments

The Shape of Inequality

Can YOU recognize the shape of inequality in America? Most can't. [more inside]
posted by ourt on May 20, 2015 - 105 comments

How Gentrification Happens

"They don’t know — here he lowers his voice — that even if they get the money and they left, they could always come back. They don’t know that part. And it’s so scary sometimes because they could come up in the middle of construction and say, “It’s my property, I didn’t understand what I was signing, and I want to come back.” -- DW Gibson interviews a Brooklyn landlord about how they push poor black residents out in favor of affluent whites.
posted by The Whelk on May 12, 2015 - 56 comments

Poor internet for poor people

Why Facebook’s Internet.org amounts to economic racism. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Apr 19, 2015 - 77 comments

The Richer and the Poorer

The Washington Post reports what the rich and poor actually spend their money on, and where [more inside]
posted by ourt on Apr 14, 2015 - 52 comments

India's Experiment in Basic Income Grants

12 minute video on India’s Experiment in Basic Income Grants "cash transfers given to all citizens to ensure that they have a minimal income". [more inside]
posted by TheophileEscargot on Apr 3, 2015 - 51 comments

Defensive Architecture Keeping Poverty Unseen

The spikes installed outside Selfridges in Manchester are the latest front in the spread of ‘defensive architecture’. Is such open hostility towards the destitute making all our lives uglier?
posted by ellieBOA on Feb 20, 2015 - 46 comments

Hard Time Valentines

Four couples, who are homeless and living in New York, talk about their lives.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 15, 2015 - 5 comments

Offline underclass

75 million Americans don’t have internet. Here’s what it’s like.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Jan 29, 2015 - 142 comments

Live-Action Dwarf Fortress

The Rat Tribe of Beijing. A photo-essay about diverse folks who live in former bomb shelters turned into private apartments underneath the streets of Beijing. By Al-Jazeera America.
posted by Pfardentrott on Jan 27, 2015 - 13 comments

A new way to tackle ultra-poverty

A new approach to assisting the "ultra-poor" – the poorest people on the planet – is showing promising results. In up to 95% of cases, the approach has been shown to help people exit the category of ultra-poverty, defined as living on less than 50 cents per day. [more inside]
posted by dontjumplarry on Jan 26, 2015 - 26 comments

The Household Mentoring Approach in Uganda

Household mentoring "is an innovative extension methodology used to work with poorer households. The specificity of this approach is that all adult members of a household, including both women and men farmers, are visited and assisted by a trained mentor selected from the local community. During these visits, men and women in a household learn how to better plan their livelihoods together, work together to improve their food security and income, and to share the benefits equally." [more inside]
posted by Sir Rinse on Jan 24, 2015 - 9 comments

Token Sucking

The Kiss of Desperation: A Disgusting Practice Vanishes With the Token/A Lewis Grizzard take on the subject from 1991
posted by josher71 on Jan 24, 2015 - 39 comments

The estate we’re in: how working class people became the ‘problem’

Being held up as “beating the odds”, “done good”, or “escaped” does not make me happy. (slTheGrauniad)
posted by Kitteh on Jan 21, 2015 - 39 comments

It's expensive to be poor.

What do poor people buy that no one else does? [askreddit post]
posted by empath on Jan 15, 2015 - 118 comments

“Wasn’t anything we could do about it.”

How White Flight Destroyed the Mississippi Delta (SL longform Atlantic)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 6, 2015 - 49 comments

The world is becoming even more suburban, and better for it.

A planet of suburbs
posted by garlic on Dec 9, 2014 - 36 comments

Generation Gaps

It's no longer just teenagers and students who seem to be running away from real life, it's people in their twenties and thirties, too. People who should really know better, but don't seem to know how to do much else. Fully grown, semi-functioning adults who are unwilling to surrender those endless nights spent staring at their own harrowed reflections in club toilet cisterns, and can't find much reason to give them up, either. People like me. This is my generation; the generation who have no real incentive to grow up. No kids to feel guilty about, no mortgages to pay off, decent enough healthcare to keep them alive, jobs that let them ​scrape the money they need to feed, house and wash themselves, and only the screams of their bosses and the worried phone calls of their families to tear them away from the noble pursuit of getting on one. An army of first-world wasters trapped in an Escher maze of immaturity.
posted by josher71 on Dec 2, 2014 - 160 comments

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