342 posts tagged with Programming.
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SNN: The Shitty News Network

A website where headlines from news agencies around the world are randomly chained together by a robot.
posted by ilama on Jul 17, 2015 - 13 comments

all technical problems are people problems that manifest technically

The Life Cycle of Programming Languages, by Betsy Haibel [previously] for Model View Culture. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 15, 2015 - 115 comments

hello.arnoldc

IT'S SHOWTIME
TALK TO THE HAND "hello world"
YOU HAVE BEEN TERMINATED

posted by boo_radley on Jul 12, 2015 - 21 comments

It's possible to create an entire "reality" using nothing but algorithms

Inspired by Dwarf Fortress and No Man's Sky, Josh Newland writes about procedural generation of game worlds at Gamasutra and presents his Unity/WebGL game project.
posted by boo_radley on Jun 25, 2015 - 16 comments

What is Code? said jesting ftrain

Paul Ford (yes, yes, MeFi's Own) has created a juggernaut of an article / lived experience / beautiful time-sink about coding. At this point I'll shut up so you can pack a lunch and go immerse yourself now.
posted by maudlin on Jun 11, 2015 - 95 comments

HoTT Coq

Univalent Foundations Redefines Mathematics - "When a legendary mathematician found a mistake in his own work, he embarked on a computer-aided quest to eliminate human error. To succeed, he has to rewrite the century-old rules underlying all of mathematics." (previously) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 9, 2015 - 13 comments

"By this art you may contemplate the variation of the 23 letters."

http://libraryofbabel.info/
The Library of Babel is a place for scholars to do research, for artists and writers to seek inspiration, for anyone with curiosity or a sense of humor to reflect on the weirdness of existence - in short, it’s just like any other library. If completed, it would contain every possible combination of 1,312,000 characters, including lower case letters, space, comma, and period. Thus, it would contain every book that ever has been written, and every book that ever could be - including every play, every song, every scientific paper, every legal decision, every constitution, every piece of scripture, and so on. At present it contains all possible pages of 3200 characters, about 104677 books. [more inside]
posted by andoatnp on May 24, 2015 - 59 comments

The roads ahead are long and winding...

Alcazar is a neat little path-finding logic game. There are also printable puzzles, strategy tips and metapuzzles to be had. [more inside]
posted by Wolfdog on May 2, 2015 - 15 comments

Leaning Out

Love is the only motivating force, and while love can motivate some pretty awful things, it’s nonetheless impossible to do any good without it. I have no love left for my job or career. Tim Chevalier on tech as a coping mechanism and a place of toxicity and moral stagnation.
posted by Zarkonnen on Apr 17, 2015 - 94 comments

Browser-based Coding Playground

Coding Ground is an amazingly comprehensive set of free online terminals and IDEs for about 100 different computing languages. The list includes Unix languages (bash, ksh, awk), cross-platform languages (Ruby, Python, Perl, Java, etc.), web languages (coffeescript, Go, Dart, jQuery) MS Windows-specific languages, markup languages (CSS3, HTML, Markdown), and even a bunch of esoteric languages (Malbolge, LOLCODE, Brainf**k, and Whitespace). These (appear to) run in fully sandboxed Docker-based containers.
posted by mcstayinskool on Apr 8, 2015 - 39 comments

Pics or it didn't happen

How I taught my dog to text me selfies
posted by a lungful of dragon on Mar 27, 2015 - 18 comments

Programmed by N A S I R

It was common practice in the 8/16 bit era for Japanese programmers to use pseudonyms or abbreviations in the game's credits, so you might not have given too much thought to the name NASIR popping up in the credits for Rad Racer, Final Fantasy II or Secret of Mana. In fact, NASIR was just the first name of programmer Nasir Gebelli, an Iranian-American who first made his name programming ambitious games like Horizon V in the Apple II era. [more inside]
posted by selfnoise on Mar 23, 2015 - 10 comments

Writing a Mandelbrot program for the IBM 1401 was an interesting project

Rarely is the question asked: can you generate a Mandelbrot fractal on a fifty year old IBM 1401 mainframe?
posted by MartinWisse on Mar 23, 2015 - 36 comments

During that same era, I had an insatiable addiction to Latin freestyle

Part 4 of an interview with noted video game developer M2, upon the completion of Outrun 3D, the latest on a series of 'SEGA 3D Classics', in which games from the golden era of arcades are meticulously ported to the Nintendo 3DS (!!) handheld system using a variety of interesting, fairly obsessive techniques. [more inside]
posted by destructive cactus on Mar 13, 2015 - 5 comments

What can we do better as a community in these cases?

Coding Like a Girl - sailor mercury at Medium:
"Apparently, presenting as feminine makes you look like a beginner. It is very frustrating that I will either look like not a programmer or look like a permanent beginner because I have programmed since age 8. I have basically always wanted to be a programmer. I received undergrad and grad degrees from MIT. I’ve worked as a visiting researcher in Honda’s humanoid robotics division on machine learning algorithms for ASIMO.

"I don’t think that any of these things make me a better programmer; I list them because I am pretty sure that if i were a white man with these credentials or even less than these credentials no one would doubt my programmer status."
[more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 12, 2015 - 126 comments

Not yet streaming: A goldfish writing perl

Watch People Code is a site where you can watch livestreams, as well as browse an archive, of people programming in real time. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Feb 20, 2015 - 26 comments

I can only hope that they never decide to implement "lolreverts"

Sometimes a one-line text-only description of your git commits just isn't enough. For those types of scenarios there is software called "lolcommits" that is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux that, when enabled, takes a photo with your webcam every time you commit your code via git. Now you can really let your co-workers know how you feel about having to fix their whitespace issues all the time with just a simple facial expression. After the photo is taken, the git message is overlayed on top of the image is a style reminiscent of lolcats. The resulting image files are then stored locally in your home directory. [more inside]
posted by surazal on Feb 16, 2015 - 22 comments

elevator.on("idle", function() { elevator.goToFloor(0); });

Elevator Saga is a game in which you write Javascript to control a bank of elevators. [more inside]
posted by alby on Feb 6, 2015 - 23 comments

To the west is a house, bricks fall from the sky, and there are zombies.

Wish you could make games but have no idea how you'd get started? Have you never coded a day in your life and feel overwhelmed trying to teach yourself? Can't draw anything beyond stick figures? Overwhelmed and don't know what questions to even ask? You're in luck! Sortingh.at is a tool that will give you personalized resources to help you get started making your first game, custom tailored to what you're actually making. (h/t)
posted by Room 641-A on Feb 2, 2015 - 15 comments

The Queen Of Code

The Queen Of Code. [more inside]
posted by chunking express on Jan 30, 2015 - 31 comments

Why I Am Not a Maker

There’s a widespread idea that “People who make things are simply different [read: better] than those who don’t.” [...] It’s not, of course, that there’s anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). The problem is the idea that the alternative to making is usually not doing nothing—it’s almost always doing things for and with other people, from the barista to the Facebook community moderator to the social worker to the surgeon. Describing oneself as a maker—regardless of what one actually or mostly does—is a way of accruing to oneself the gendered, capitalist benefits of being a person who makes products. [more inside]
posted by haltingproblemsolved on Jan 24, 2015 - 116 comments

Fake 3D Until You Make 3D

Louis Gorenfeld lovingly explores the mathematics and techniques behind early, pseudo-3D games. [more inside]
posted by gilrain on Jan 9, 2015 - 16 comments

Computer Scientists Make the Same Salary, Whether Male or Female.

Female Computer Scientists Make the Same Salary as Their Male Counterparts - for a while. Whatever the reasons for the gender disparity in programming, at least to begin with, there's no actual salary difference between female and male programmers. According to a new study by the American Association of University Women, [PDF] there is no statistical difference between female and male programmers salaries one year out of college. The same holds true for women who go into engineering, mathematics and physical sciences" [more inside]
posted by vapidave on Jan 7, 2015 - 36 comments

"I also like getting a good night’s sleep."

Me: I’d like to get a little more physically active.
Them: You should come run a marathon on the weekend!
Why I don’t like hackathons, by Alex Bayley aged 39 1/2.
posted by MartinWisse on Dec 19, 2014 - 73 comments

Null Pointers for All

Dr Dobbs, one of the oldest programming publications announces the end.
posted by blue_beetle on Dec 16, 2014 - 39 comments

I Have Created 50 Games This Year

Kenta Cho of ABA Games has released 50 minigames this year. They are all free to play on his site, with source. [more inside]
posted by 23 on Dec 15, 2014 - 25 comments

Out of the Tar Pit: Analysis of Software Complexity

Out of the Tar Pit (SL-GitHub to PDF) by Ben Moseley and Peter Marks. Abstract:
Complexity is the single major difficulty in the successful development of large-scale software systems. Following Brooks we distinguish accidental from essential difficulty, but disagree with his premise that most complexity remaining in contemporary systems is essential. We identify common causes of complexity and discuss general approaches which can be taken to eliminate them where they are accidental in nature. To make things more concrete we then give an outline for a potential complexity-minimizing approach based on functional programming and Codd’s relational model of data.
[more inside]
posted by JoeXIII007 on Nov 17, 2014 - 19 comments

Hmm!! no compilation/linker error!!! Why is it so??

C puzzles - Dear visitor, Thanks for your interest in C programming. In this page, you will find a list of interesting C programming questions/puzzles. Not a huge list, but an interesting one.
posted by Wolfdog on Nov 15, 2014 - 28 comments

I put my thing down, flip it and reverse it

If you've ever typed anything into a Google Doc, you can now play it back as if it were a movie — like traveling through time to look over your own shoulder as you write.

This is possible because every document written in Google Docs since about May 2010 has a revision history that tracks every change, by every user, with timestamps accurate to the microsecond; these histories are available to anyone with "Edit" permissions; and I have written a piece of software that can find, decode, and rebuild the history for any given document.
James Somers (previously) introduces Draftback. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Nov 6, 2014 - 21 comments

Let's build a browser engine!

Matt Brubeck is building a toy HTML rendering engine, and he thinks you should too.
posted by boo_radley on Nov 5, 2014 - 9 comments

Diversity within us comes out better when there's diversity in our team.

The most recent episode of the Ruby Rogues podcast — #179 Accountability and Diversity with Meagan Waller — is a treasure trove of insights and info about unconscious biases, diversity, employment, culture, tech, and more. The podcast page features a timestamped topic outline of the discussion, as well as many links to the Ruby community websites, projects, studies, conferences, and controversies they discuss… [more inside]
posted by iamkimiam on Nov 3, 2014 - 5 comments

ScratchJr

ScratchJr is an introductory visual programming language for young children. It is inspired by Scratch (previously), and is available as a free iPad app. Future plans include an Android version and a web-based version.
posted by tykky on Sep 10, 2014 - 23 comments

Games for tomorrow's programmers.

Blockly Games is a series of educational games that teach programming. It is designed for children who have not had prior experience with computer programming. By the end of these games, players are ready to use conventional text-based languages.
posted by boo_radley on Sep 4, 2014 - 20 comments

Coding for Journalists 101

So a little while ago, I set out to write some tutorials that would guide the non-coding-but-computer-savvy journalist through enough programming fundamentals so that he/she could write a web scraper to collect data from public websites.
[more inside]
posted by postcommunism on Aug 29, 2014 - 40 comments

How does ('' == [] && this); make programmers feel?

Programming language subreddits and their choice of words presents an interactive chord graph showing how often particular languages are mentioned in other languages' communities. Another chart shows how proportional others' mentions are to the TIOBE Index. And some very elementary sentiment analysis suggests how often each language inspires pure theory, happiness and fun, or cursing. A tongue-in-cheek aside reveals that counting infrequently-mentioned languages yields another happiness/coolness chart that puts Elm at the top, just above other surprises.
posted by Monsieur Caution on Aug 23, 2014 - 28 comments

girls and technology!

WYNC's Manoush Zomorodi investigates the gender gap in tech and computer science, and finds a number of people working towards bridging that gap, from childhood to university: completely restructuring a required computer science course to make it more welcoming to female university students, celebrating women in computing history (and recognizing that computer science wasn't so male-dominated, and making children's books and toys (even dollhouses!) for kids to explore programming concepts on their own. She also noticed that the majority of female computer science students in the US had grown up overseas - possibly because computer science isn't a common subject in American high schools. This is slated to change: a new AP Computer Science subject is in the works, with efforts to get 10,000 highly-trained computer science teachers in 10,000 high schools across the US. If you want to join Mindy Kaling in supporting young girls entering computer science, tech, and coding, there's a lot [more inside]
posted by divabat on Aug 16, 2014 - 70 comments

do while !glory

Welcome to Al Zimmermann's Programming Contests. You've entered an arena where demented computer programmers compete for glory and for some cool prizes. The current challenge is just about to come to an end, but you can peruse the previous contests and prepare for the new one starting next month.
posted by Wolfdog on Aug 14, 2014 - 11 comments

You want to go and slay all the false statements in the world

This Letter to a Young Haskell Enthusiast is mostly not about Haskell, or about programming, but about being a good person in an online community.
posted by swift on Aug 1, 2014 - 40 comments

An excellent programming language for data analysis

"Julia is a high-level, high-performance dynamic programming language for technical computing." The language is elegant (homoiconic, multiple-dispatch, consistent and extensible type system), but with easy-to-learn syntax. The standard library includes a wide array of fast and useful functions, and the number of useful packages is growing. [more inside]
posted by vogon_poet on Jul 20, 2014 - 34 comments

I Can Tell By The Pixels

Visualizing Algorithms shows you how computer algorithms can be represented visually, leading to better understanding of how the algorithms work:

"Have you ever implemented an algorithm based on formal description? It can be hard! Being able to see what your code is doing can boost productivity. Visualization does not supplant the need for tests, but tests are useful primarily for detecting failure and not explaining it. Visualization can also discover unexpected behavior in your implementation, even when the output looks correct."
posted by quiet earth on Jun 26, 2014 - 29 comments

It doesn't do anything different and yet you are changing it

How to approach refactoring by Venkat Subramaniam (YouTube lecture) [more inside]
posted by flabdablet on Jun 24, 2014 - 17 comments

Eigendemocracy: crowd-sourced deliberative democracy

Scott Aaronson on building a 'PageRank' for (eigen)morality and (eigen)trust - "Now, would those with axes to grind try to subvert such a system the instant it went online? Certainly. For example, I assume that millions of people would rate Conservapedia as a more trustworthy source than Wikipedia—and would rate other people who had done so as, themselves, trustworthy sources, while rating as untrustworthy anyone who called Conservapedia untrustworthy. So there would arise a parallel world of trust and consensus and 'expertise', mutually-reinforcing yet nearly disjoint from the world of the real. But here's the thing: anyone would be able to see, with the click of a mouse, the extent to which this parallel world had diverged from the real one." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 23, 2014 - 45 comments

The Count and his fucking LF

Coder's High. Metafilter's own David Auerbach, who says he's now a former programmer, describes a satori-like absorption that comes only from things like debugging.
posted by grobstein on Jun 18, 2014 - 73 comments

Supercomputer fools Kryton from Red Dwarf

A supercomputer has fooled judges a third of the time that it is a 13 year old Russian schoolboy named Eugene Goostman.
posted by 0bvious on Jun 8, 2014 - 65 comments

$(framework).stop();

Stop Writing JavaScript Frameworks! And stop using them too!
posted by blue_beetle on May 25, 2014 - 45 comments

Recreational Music Destruction

Sure, you like your mp3s well enough; you just wish they would steadily collapse into a wall of distortion and white noise. Good news: The Disintegrator is here to help. [via mefi projects]
posted by cortex on May 25, 2014 - 29 comments

Artist's Notebook: Ramsey Nasser

"Arabic programming languages with the honest goal of bringing coding to a non-Latin culture have been attempted in the past, but have failed without exception. What makes my piece قلب different is that its primary purpose was to illustrate how impossible coding in anything but English has become."
posted by invitapriore on May 5, 2014 - 46 comments

s/camel/_/

Right now someone who works for Facebook is getting tens of thousands of error messages and frantically trying to find the problem before the whole charade collapses. There's a team at a Google office that hasn't slept in three days. Somewhere there's a database programmer surrounded by empty Mountain Dew bottles whose husband thinks she's dead. And if these people stop, the world burns. Most people don't even know what sysadmins do, but trust me, if they all took a lunch break at the same time they wouldn't make it to the deli before you ran out of bullets protecting your canned goods from roving bands of mutants.
posted by xqwzts on Apr 30, 2014 - 90 comments

MetaFilter​FrontPage​BlogPost​TitleContent​String

Two of these Java class names from the Spring framework are made up. One of them is real. Can you guess the real one?
posted by schmod on Apr 18, 2014 - 60 comments

A SAT Attack on the Erdos Discrepancy Conjecture

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can't check - "A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it's talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia's pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm." (via; previously ;)
posted by kliuless on Apr 12, 2014 - 24 comments

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