Join 3,440 readers in helping fund MetaFilter (Hide)

565 posts tagged with Psychology. (View popular tags)
Displaying 201 through 250 of 565. Subscribe:

Related tags:
+ (81)
+ (37)
+ (34)
+ (32)
+ (30)
+ (29)
+ (29)
+ (25)
+ (24)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (23)
+ (21)
+ (20)
+ (19)
+ (18)
+ (18)
+ (17)
+ (17)
+ (15)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (14)
+ (13)
+ (13)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (12)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (11)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (10)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (9)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)
+ (8)


Users that often use this tag:
homunculus (43)
shivohum (24)
AceRock (19)
nickyskye (17)
zarq (17)
kliuless (13)
amyms (7)
grumblebee (7)
reenum (6)
escabeche (6)
Gyan (6)
saulgoodman (6)
all-seeing eye dog (5)
Blasdelb (5)
srboisvert (4)
the man of twists ... (4)
y2karl (4)
daksya (4)
blahblahblah (4)
rcraniac (4)
taz (3)
vidur (3)
philipy (3)
filthy light thief (3)
Artw (3)
semmi (3)
mrgrimm (3)
moonbird (3)
emilyd22222 (3)
painquale (3)
MiguelCardoso (3)
jason's_planet (3)
desjardins (3)
2shay (3)
netbros (3)
cashman (2)
Kronos_to_Earth (2)
naju (2)
charmston (2)
Foci for Analysis (2)
troutfishing (2)
empath (2)
wolfdreams01 (2)
Ambrosia Voyeur (2)
parudox (2)
mathowie (2)
quin (2)
l33tpolicywonk (2)
Fizz (2)
Del Far (2)
OmieWise (2)
flex (2)
iamkimiam (2)
Marisa Stole the P... (2)
Irontom (2)
skallas (2)
Keter (2)
Sticherbeast (2)
five fresh fish (2)
Oriole Adams (2)

Does the language we speak shape our thoughts? - An online debate

Does the language we speak shape our thoughts? The Economist is hosting an interactive online debate running all this week. Lena Boroditsky, a Stanford psychologist, supports the motion that it does, while Mark Liberman, a linguist from the Univ of Pennsylvania opposes it. Elsewhere you can read a WSJ article in which among other things Boroditsky argues that Japanese and Spanish speakers have a different sense of blame, and listen to a lively in-depth seminar at the Long Now Foundation. All her articles and papers are available in PDF online.
posted by philipy on Dec 15, 2010 - 72 comments

The Truth about Suicide Bombers?

Growing evidence suggests suicide bombers may be just ... well, suicidal. The idea is controversial and contentious, to be sure, but there is a small but growing movement among social scientists that the reasoning behind suicide bombing might be more mundane than religious "fanaticism" or "deluded" ideology. [more inside]
posted by zooropa on Dec 12, 2010 - 22 comments

You saw this post coming

An eight-year, extremely large study (p = 1.34 × 10-11) has found statistically significant results that point towards a human capability for precognition. Reviewers for the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology are puzzled by the paper but cannot find any flaws in its methodology. Is this confirmation of the fluid nature of time? Or is it simply another candidate for the Journal of Irreproducible Results?
posted by shii on Nov 11, 2010 - 100 comments

The Dalai Lama at Stanford

The Dalai Lama on changing minds only through compassion and respect. He spent several days at Stanford recently, and this session focuses on the neuroscience of compassion. Watch it in full here.
posted by philipy on Oct 21, 2010 - 56 comments

Believing is seeing, seeing is hearing

Is seeing believing? BBC Horizon looks at sensory perception, illusions and the interplay of our different senses. (Full program for UK viewers here). Makes you feel like you've entered The Twilight Zone. [more inside]
posted by philipy on Oct 18, 2010 - 16 comments

The fine art of surfacing

Live coverage of the rescue operation of the 33 Chilean miners who have been stranded underground for the last 68 days. NASA are helping in more ways than one but it isn't over yet.
posted by Elizabeth the Thirteenth on Oct 12, 2010 - 191 comments

The Scope-Severity Paradox

In an ideal world, you’d imagine that someone who harmed more people would deserve a harsher treatment: a new paper by Loran F. Nordgren and Mary McDonnell, The Scope-Severity Paradox, suggests people find crime with fewer victims more severe than those with more victims. [PDF link] [more inside]
posted by MuffinMan on Oct 4, 2010 - 47 comments

The Force of liberal guilt, it is strong.

Kill Whitey. It's the Right Thing to do. [more inside]
posted by googly on Sep 28, 2010 - 142 comments

Mooing Vuitton in the verdant fields of a mall.

"What was lost in the realm of economic exchange is reclaimed in the realm of cultural/semiotic performance. Branding also identifies the product relative to the chain of signifiers constituting its brand “family,” in the same way that ranchers brand livestock with the sign of their ranch." [via]
posted by nickrussell on Sep 15, 2010 - 11 comments

1 in 38,000,000

You are more likely to be killed by a pig than a shark. You run a greater risk of dying from an asteroid impact than a terrorist attack. You would have to fly an average of 38,000 years in commercial aviation before suffering a fatal crash. The fears parents have for their children have nothing in common to what will actually kill or hurt them. Our perception of risk has very little relation to threat: some helpful visual guides [PDF] and reasons why.
posted by Bora Horza Gobuchul on Sep 9, 2010 - 124 comments

75,000 is the magic number

"We infer that beyond about $75,000/y, there is no improvement whatever in any of the three measures of emotional well-being." Two social scientists at Princeton, Angus Deaton and Nobelist Daniel Kahneman, have a new paper in PNAS about money and the determinants of happiness. Increased income above $75,000 is not associated with higher subjective happiness, though it is associated with superior scores on measures of overall life satisfaction. Other tidbits: "Religion has a substantial influence on improving positive affect and reducing reports of stress, but no effect on reducing sadness or worry... The presence of children at home is associated with significant increases in stress, sadness, and worry."
posted by escabeche on Sep 8, 2010 - 49 comments

That rug really tied the room together, did it not?

Ugly Vegas Carpets Want You to Keep Playing. "Mathematician-philosopher Alfred North Whitehead once said, “It requires a very unusual mind to undertake the analysis of the obvious.” This certainly rings true with Chris Maluszynski’s Las Vegas Carpets series, whose name explains it all. The photos draw out the psychology of Las Vegas through the simple observation of carpet."
posted by Fizz on Sep 2, 2010 - 51 comments

The WEIRD ones

Westerners vs. the World: We are the WEIRD ones
posted by bardophile on Aug 29, 2010 - 81 comments

What Motivates Us?

Challenging the notion that humans are motivated by monetary reward, Dan Pink presents a variety of studies that test this notion. Inspired by his newest book, Drive
posted by fantodstic on Aug 26, 2010 - 34 comments

120 days in the hole

After 17 days, 33 Chilean miners have been found alive 2,300 vertical feet underground in a gold and copper mine. Now the only thing left to do is get them out safely -- in about four months.
posted by Gilbert on Aug 24, 2010 - 115 comments

What Is It About 20-Somethings?

Twenty-somethings today don't quite fit the definition of adolescence or adulthood. This has thrown the human development gurus for a loop. [more inside]
posted by reenum on Aug 18, 2010 - 136 comments

Long lasting prejudices

In 1939, psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark performed an experiment with dolls which was instrumental to Brown vs Board of Education, a case that struck down black/white segregation in American education. Earlier this year, CNN's AC360 aired the results (update, also) of a follow up statistical study on racial bias in today's children. Anderson Cooper himself explains his motives. [more inside]
posted by knz on Aug 16, 2010 - 72 comments

You Dirty Chicken Plucker

Howard Bloom: Exercising the Animals in the Brain [more inside]
posted by nola on Aug 9, 2010 - 25 comments

Stress

Under Pressure: The Search for a Stress Vaccine.
posted by homunculus on Jul 31, 2010 - 47 comments

Pampered pigs 'feel optimistic'

Pampered pigs 'feel optimistic'
posted by memebake on Jul 29, 2010 - 41 comments

Caring with cash

Shared social responsibility - When customers could pay what they wanted in the knowledge that half of that would go to charity, sales and profits went through the roof ... Gneezy describes the combination of charitable donations and paying what you like as 'shared social responsibility', where businesses and customers work together for the public good. (via mr) [also see 1,2,3]
posted by kliuless on Jul 28, 2010 - 19 comments

Ok, you are. But not you.

You think people know what you are thinking. You think that you are rational. You even think that life is fair. Actually, you are not that smart.
posted by ejoey on Jul 27, 2010 - 66 comments

Medieval Cyborgs

Our cyborg past: Medieval artificial memory as mindware upgrade. [Via]
posted by homunculus on Jul 26, 2010 - 28 comments

The New Science of Morality

The New Science of Morality: An Edge seminar featuring talks (with full video, audio and text transcripts) by Paul Bloom, Roy Baumeister, Joshua Greene, Jonathan Haidt, Sam Harris, Marc Hauser, Josua Knobe, Elizabeth Phelps, and David Pizarro.
posted by AceRock on Jul 26, 2010 - 24 comments

Epic Mafia: FOSing without claiming would be a scumtell if it weren't for WIFOM

Every person is assigned a role at the start of the game. You are randomly sided with either the village, the mafia, or a third party. During the night, the mafia secretly meet and discuss to decide who they want to kill, while other power roles decide what to do. During the day, the village players must figure out who is not sided with the village and get rid of them. [more inside]
posted by GooseOnTheLoose on Jul 17, 2010 - 38 comments

Picky Eating - Mental Disorder?

Picky Eating might be added to the DSM.
posted by backseatpilot on Jul 6, 2010 - 358 comments

You're an Animal!

In a fundamental re-think of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, a research team lead by Arizona State University's Doug Kenrick has replaced the personal need to achieve status and respect, culminating in self-actualization, with the biological imperative to find a mate and reproduce, culminating in parenting. Kenrick also replaces Maslow's strict design, in which needs replace one another, with a design in which needs overlap over the course of a lifetime. [more inside]
posted by l33tpolicywonk on Jun 30, 2010 - 126 comments

Study: Lesbian Parents Raise Better-Behaved Kids

A nearly 25-year study has concluded that children raised in lesbian households were psychologically well-adjusted and had fewer behavioral problems than their peers. Results were published this month in Pediatrics: the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. (Abstract. Free PDF. Scribd). [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 7, 2010 - 98 comments

"No matter what ideas the human mind generates, they must never be quashed."

New Scientist Special Report: Living in Denial. Includes articles by Michael Shermer, founding publisher of Skeptic Magazine [more inside]
posted by zarq on May 28, 2010 - 37 comments

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti

In the late 1950s, psychologist Milton Rokeach was gripped by an eccentric plan. He gathered three psychiatric patients, each with the delusion that they were Jesus Christ, to live together for two years in Ypsilanti State Hospital to see if their beliefs would change. Vaughan Bell tells the story of one of the weirdest experiments in the history of psychology. (via)
posted by The Mouthchew on May 27, 2010 - 57 comments

The Moral Life of Babies

"A growing body of evidence suggests that humans have a rudimentary moral sense from the very start of life... Some sense of good and evil seems to be bred in the bone... [But] the sense of right and wrong that [babies] naturally possess diverges in important ways from what we adults would want it to be."
posted by AceRock on May 10, 2010 - 91 comments

working working memory with dual n-back

dual n-back is a simple working memory game of unbounded difficulty. [more inside]
posted by melatonic on May 9, 2010 - 31 comments

A general theory of individuality

We Need a General Theory of Individuality : "One of the unspoken secrets in basic scientific research, from anthropology to zoology (with intervening stops at physiology, political science, psychology, psychiatry, and sociology) is that, nearly always, individuals turn out to be different from one another, and that—to an extent rarely admitted and virtually never pursued—scientific generalizations tend to hush up those differences"
posted by dhruva on May 5, 2010 - 75 comments

Shades of Kitty Genovese

Homeless man Hugo Alfredo Tale-Yax was stabbed several times in the chest while saving a woman from a knife-wielding attacker in New York City. He then bled to death while dozens of people walked by -- one stopping to snap a picture of the dying man with his cameraphone before leaving the scene. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Apr 25, 2010 - 82 comments

color-changing card trick

A color-changing card trick. (Related to this old favorite.)
posted by Upton O'Good on Apr 22, 2010 - 25 comments

Emotional Cues and Facial Paralysis

"She needed company, sympathy — someone, anyone, to see and feel her loss — and searched the face of her assigned social worker in vain." [more inside]
posted by zizzle on Apr 6, 2010 - 15 comments

Economics and Physics Envy

"Take a little bad psychology, add a dash of bad philosophy and ethics, and liberal quantities of bad logic, and any economist can prove that the demand curve for a commodity is negatively inclined." MIT economist Andrew Lo and string theorist turned asset manager Mark Mueller on the "physics envy" that plagues economics, and how to stop worrying and love uncertainty.
posted by escabeche on Apr 1, 2010 - 37 comments

"One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important."

Stress: Our collective mood - "there seems to be a correlation between stress and lack of holidays. More important, however, is whether a relationship exists between either and economic performance. The data is equivocal. On average Americans put in an extra two hours a week compared with UK workers. Yet both countries had almost identical crises, while lazier nations fared considerably better." also btw: Why Women Don't Want Macho Men (cf. A Theory for Why Latvian Women are Beautiful) & Study Shows People In Power Make Better Liars (The psychology of power or The Duke and Dirty Harry)
posted by kliuless on Mar 27, 2010 - 21 comments

Me Tarzan. You Jane. He Skeptic.

This article, about differences between male and female brains, is doing the rounds on various blogs. (I found it via reddit.) Meanwhile, debunkers are doing their best to rip the author a new asshole.
posted by grumblebee on Mar 25, 2010 - 86 comments

The Psychology of the Unthinkable

The Psychology of the Taboo Trade-Off. A set of studies about issues that are considered "sacred" that can have an effect on the trade-offs involved in foreign policy. (via) [more inside]
posted by charred husk on Mar 19, 2010 - 12 comments

The "Still-Face" Experiment

The "Still Face" Paradigm (YT video) designed by Dr. Edward Tronick of Harvard and Childrens Hospital’s Child Development Unit, is an experiment which shows us how a 1-year old child will react to a suddenly unresponsive parent. It allows us to understand how a caregiver's interactions and emotional state can influence many aspects of an infant's social and emotional development. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Mar 15, 2010 - 22 comments

The Psychology of Video Games

The Psychology of Video Games. Jamie Madigan has a Ph.D. in psychology. He's also a Gamer with a capital G, has written gaming strategy guides and countless game reviews, and follows the gaming scene like some people follow baseball. In his blog, Jamie tells you "why things are" when it comes to game psychology. Conan the Loss Averse Barbarian. How Reciprocity Yields Bumper Crops in Farmville. Phat Loot and Neurotransmitters in World of Warcraft. [more inside]
posted by Cool Papa Bell on Mar 10, 2010 - 58 comments

Over prescribe much?

Oregon is set to become the third state in the US to allow psychologists (with no medical training) to write prescriptions. Senate Bill 1046 (PDF version on Google Docs) will become law by next July unless the Governor vetoes it. One funny twist: during public hearings on the bill, it was revealed that an out-of-state expert (who was temporarily licensed in Oregon so he could give recommendations on the panel) happened to run a school that trained psychologists to prescribe meds, which would directly benefit from the bill's passage.
posted by mathowie on Mar 2, 2010 - 87 comments

DSM-5

At midnight tonight, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) released a proposed draft of the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). [more inside]
posted by emilyd22222 on Feb 9, 2010 - 58 comments

Goodbye to a skeptical visionary

Seymour Sarason, a man considered to be one of the fathers of community psychology and one of the most influential U.S. researchers in educational psychology and educational reform, died on Thursday at the age of 91. [more inside]
posted by emilyd22222 on Jan 30, 2010 - 7 comments

Morals Authority

"What I want to do now is help both sides understand the other, so that policies can be made based on something more than misguided fear of what the other side is up to." Jonathan Haidt proposes a more civil form of politics based on his work in moral psychology. [more inside]
posted by jquinby on Jan 22, 2010 - 30 comments

I bet you look good on the dancefloor

Peter Lovatt is a psychologist at the University of Hertfordshire (UK) and a former professional dancer. No wonder, he knows the secrets of looking good on the dance floor.
posted by jfricke on Jan 21, 2010 - 10 comments

Braitenberg vehicles: How to build a brain

Valentino Braitenberg's 1984 book, Vehicles: Experiments in Synthetic Psychology was a seminal work for its discussion of how one might design a system (biological or otherwise) in order to generate behavior like that seen in beings with brains. He embarks on a series of thought experiments in which he creates thirteen "vehicles" through simple components that (arguably) display intelligent behavior, evolving in a Darwinian fashion to demonstrate what appears to be high-level cognition. [more inside]
posted by emilyd22222 on Jan 17, 2010 - 16 comments

(glowing) prairie voles illuminate the human condition

Monogamouse
Prairie voles have many vasopressin receptors in the reward centres of their brains. It seems as though these are wired up in a way that causes the animal to take pleasure from monogamy. (previously 1|2)
posted by kliuless on Jan 9, 2010 - 20 comments

Why Are People Always Having Sex With Dragons In Science Fiction?

[NSFW] Why Are People Always Having Sex With Dragons In Science Fiction?
posted by jason's_planet on Dec 26, 2009 - 158 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 12