359 posts tagged with Punk.
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Women at at punk shows are done with your shit

Australian indie-punk band Camp Cope has spearheaded a call to action for bands, venue staff, and concert-goers to stand up against sexual harassment at shows, in part because of incident that went viral at their gig this past may. Their hashtag, #ItTakesOne, has been picked up by other Aussies in the music scene, including Courtney Barnett, and Luca Brasi-who notes the importance of strong male presence in the movement:
"It shouldn't solely be the responsibility of women to fix the problem," they wrote. "We feel it's important for men to speak too, and speak out against other men's behaviour and be positive role models to other men."
The band has been sending this message since the beginning- their cardinal song Jet Fuel Can't Melt Steel Beams is an anthem exploring the ideal of female safe spaces. [more inside]
posted by FirstMateKate on Dec 1, 2016 - 21 comments

Putting on shows, playing with glitter, and selling stuff.

Tish and Snooky tell the story of how they founded Manic Panic, starting as a punk store on St Marks in the East Village.
posted by moonmilk on Nov 5, 2016 - 19 comments

Looks bad Todd

This Artist Re-Imagined Your Favorite Hardcore Bands as Pokemon and Did a Really Shitty Job
posted by griphus on Oct 28, 2016 - 18 comments

Arrrr

Iceland's Pirate Party looks likely to take the country's election next weekend - "If you're worn out and depressed with the US election campaign, ponder what's going on in Iceland for a moment. The country's Pirate Party, founded less than four years ago by a group of activists, anarchists, and hackers, is poised to upend Icelandic politics with an Oct. 29 general-election victory."
posted by kliuless on Oct 26, 2016 - 92 comments

盲人摸象

“We live in China, but we saw Fugazi’s DVD as many times as you guys did in America,” says Xubo, singer and guitarist for the most successful contemporary emo band in China, Chinese Football. “I grew up [on] the late ‘90s and early ’00s pop-punk and emo wave,” he says, “so I loved U.S. bands like blink-182, Green Day, Jimmy Eat World, and all the bands from Drive-Thru Records back in high school. As I grew up, I listened to more and more.” - The rise of Emo in Asia
posted by Potomac Avenue on Oct 20, 2016 - 4 comments

Sex Pistols/Vicious White Kids, Live 78

Vicious White Kids - Electric Ballroom, London - August 22, 1978. Sex Pistols, Longhorn Ballroom, Dallas, Texas - January 10, 1978. (This is the concert where Sid's bass comes unplugged and Steve Jones stops playing, walks over and plugs it in again - it is at about 6:30.) Bonus - Sex Pistols, Winterland, January 1978 - their final concert. (This has been an FPP previously but the link no longer works.) All links are Youtube. [more inside]
posted by marienbad on Oct 9, 2016 - 10 comments

Bishop Backs Squatters

The Golden Age of Squatting, a history of London's squats and what squatting looks like in the present day.
The squat movement flowered in London in the 1970s, when an estimated 30,000 people lived in squats in Greater London, and the movement provided the base for many London subcultures over several decades. In 2012, the scene took a legal body blow when squatting in residential (rather than commercial) properties was made a criminal offense
posted by frimble on Sep 21, 2016 - 9 comments

A pint of fear and home by teatime

Fundamentalist punk rock art collective The Mekons present their "hymn for Brexit," Fear & Beer. This track, like the rest of their new album Existentialism, was recorded on a single microphone in a single evening in front of a paying audience. The 75 attendees, dubbed the Mekoristers and credited by their names in the liner notes of the album, sang backing vocals in the style of Phil Minton's famous feral choirs. They become almost another instrument or sound effect — a distant, disconcerting drone or howl that permeates songs of political unrest and social chaos. Plus, you can dance to them (or simply shout along). [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Sep 8, 2016 - 14 comments

40 years of partying like a punkette

The Story of Feminist Punk in 33 Songs: From Patti Smith to Bikini Kill, the songs that have crushed stereotypes and steered progress (Pitchfork). More than a list of songs, it's an overview of feminist expression through raw music, from 1975 to 2015, with an introduction by Vivien Goldman. "Because nothing beats jamming and singing with your sisters. That is punk. Punk freed female musicians. It is yours. Sing it, play it, live it now." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 12, 2016 - 48 comments

I'm Buffy and You're History

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: a role model for the modern feminist "After more than a decade of reading Buffy academia, to which Patricia Pender’s I’m Buffy and You’re History is a very laudable addition, I’m starting to know why this show continues to inspire sincere and thoughtful devotion among intellectual people who need to talk about gender and about what it means to be a woman in our world." ~ Naomi Alderman, The Spectator [more inside]
posted by pjsky on Aug 7, 2016 - 75 comments

EMI: the inside story of Britain's biggest music company

Electric & Musical Industries was formed in 1931, initially releasing classical music, but went on to launch the Beatles, who changed the record label's operations and funded the company for years and years. The label's recording rules were further broadened by Queen and Pink Floyd. EMI ushered punk into the mainstream with Sex Pistols, and then embraced the New Romanticism and the polished excesses of Duran Duran. They made music videos big with Pet Shop Boys and made Brit Pop a thing with Blur, and were home to Radiohead. This is the inside story of EMI, one of the greatest British brands in recording history, as told by people involved with the record label's storied history, augmented by company and performance footage. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 5, 2016 - 14 comments

Never Mind The Bollocks - The Making of a Classic Album

Documentary about the making of the Sex Pistols seminal album. Also discusses how the band came together, signing to EMI/A&M/Virgin, the Grundy Scandal and resultant publicity, and some footage shot by their tour manager of them in Berlin by the wall. Warning: contains Malcolm McLaren. [more inside]
posted by marienbad on May 25, 2016 - 18 comments

Never Mind the Bus Pass

Where are they now? The Guardian UK catches up with a few aging icons of the Punk Rock scene.
posted by Smart Dalek on May 7, 2016 - 37 comments

Stars reign down - on you

Through Silver In Blood turns 20. Invisible Oranges reflects on the dense, white-hot cornerstone of Neurosis' 30 year career. A marriage of ritualistic drumming, suffocating noise, and crushing distortion, best exemplified in this profound live rendition of Locust Star. [more inside]
posted by Existential Dread on Apr 24, 2016 - 21 comments

Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood’s son to burn £5m punk memorabilia

“A general malaise has now set in amongst the British public. People are feeling numb. And with numbness comes complacency. People don’t feel they have a voice anymore,” [Corré] says. “The most dangerous thing is that they have stopped fighting for what they believe in. They have given up the chase. We need to explode all the shit once more”. Related article, at bbc.com.
posted by terooot on Mar 23, 2016 - 49 comments

Johnny Ramone's last interview

"He's almost a father figure, or a mentor to me," says Robert Carmine, the twenty-one-year-old singer for Rooney, who one night slipped Johnny a demo tape that Johnny liked. "He never had a kid. The Ramones were his baby that he was obsessed with. When he retired, he needed something else to focus on, and that's his friends and his wife. He's given me a lot of great advice: Play to the back row, not the people in front; get a straight mike stand, not a boom stand; own your section of the stage; watch the money; learn what other people did that was cool. He's turned me on to such great old music, like Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent. "He's a much kinder person now than when he was in the band," Carmine continues. "But the thing with Joey is ongoing. We watched the documentary together in his house, and he couldn't stay in the room when they were talking about the Joey stuff. He's still got that pain and anger that he can't quite let go of and become the person he's mostly become."
posted by josher71 on Mar 18, 2016 - 14 comments

Patti Smith’s Eternal Flame

“No matter what anybody thinks about any of them,” said Patti Smith, “every record I’ve done has been done with the same amount of care, anguish, pain, suffering, and joy. We never threw a record together. Each record was done really seriously, as if our life depended on it.”
Alan Light interviews Patti Smith, discussing her life and work. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Feb 19, 2016 - 7 comments

Wooooooooooo! Woo wooooo!

PUP - DVP (Official Video) (SLVimeo)
posted by slater on Feb 12, 2016 - 3 comments

The unlikely and awesome rise of punk, anarchist, and hacker

Birgitta Jónsdóttir May Be Iceland's Next Prime Minister - "Poetry told Birgitta that she is alive. The internet taught her that she belongs in this world. The crisis showed her that she has a role to play, and politics showed her that everything needs to change." (Jónsdóttir, WikiLeaks & Iceland, previously) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Feb 7, 2016 - 36 comments

1234!

Forty years of the Ramones ‘They were the smartest dumb band you ever heard’: Bands from the Sex Pistols to Blondie to Talking Heads recall the Bowery punks’ explosive impact
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 3, 2016 - 40 comments

Raw Power: From Iggy and the Stooges to AMD and Blu-ray

The Leap: The Improbable Transformation of a Punk Pioneer (mp3) - "James Williamson is a successful tech executive who's been working in Silicon Valley for decades. But it turns out Williamson had a secret, something that no one working with him knew. He was a pioneer in a type of music that is about as far from the tech world as you can get." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 31, 2016 - 24 comments

What Is Punk?

"What Is Punk?" or, Using 2016 Playlist Statistics To Make Punk Old People Fussy
posted by Greg Nog on Jan 27, 2016 - 184 comments

I just wanna do it all surprise!

Hilariously bad Spanish covers of the Sex Pistols, circa 1978. Behold: Anarchy in the UK. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Jan 3, 2016 - 29 comments

SHOCK!

How to Look Punk - a guide from 1977.
posted by Artw on Dec 24, 2015 - 35 comments

Ork records: the hidden side of New York punk

Everyone knows the Ramones and Talking Heads, but a host of obscure bands were integral to the CBGBs scene – and now their records have been rediscovered.
posted by josher71 on Dec 9, 2015 - 14 comments

Do You Hear What We Hear?

Cult favorite punk cabaret duo Kiki & Herb released a Christmas album full of spiteful brio years ago that's been nearly imposssible to find since ...That is until Kenny Mellman (Herb) put the entire thing on soundcloud.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 4, 2015 - 18 comments

“…if you use a razor blade and glue; you can change the whole world.”

The Art of Punk (previously) is a documentary series from MOCAtv, the L.A. Museum of Contemporary Arts’ YoutTube channel. The series looks at the visual language of the punk rock movement by focussing on three legendary punk rock bands and the seminal artists behind their iconic logos. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 1, 2015 - 4 comments

Punk Crock

Punk, we greasy teens soon learned, was once the rightful province of a worthy few able to discern reality from simulacrum, irony from sincerity, punks from poseurs, shit from Shinola. Punk was diametrically opposed to massification; like an ailing Victorian child, it would die if exposed to the slavering crowd.
posted by latkes on Nov 20, 2015 - 42 comments

a very real punk news site that you should not question

The Hard Times brings you all the (somehow occasionally mistaken for real) punk rock news. [more inside]
posted by Pope Guilty on Nov 19, 2015 - 28 comments

I fought the law, and the law won (unless it didn't)

Outlaw songs are at least as old as popular music itself. The image of a gallant loner battling a rigid and unyielding legal establishment has proved irresistible for generations of songwriters. In 1959, Texan Sonny Curtis wrote one of the best, "I Fought The Law." Intended as a vehicle for himself and the post-Buddy Holly Crickets, their single went precisely nowhere.
That is, until it was covered -- the first hit cover was by The Bobby Fuller Four in 1965, then another major version came out 14 years later, from The Clash who revived the "oldie" into what is now a "punk anthem." From there, the covers start piling up.... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 11, 2015 - 29 comments

Bainbridge Island

People think of Bainbridge Island as a peaceful, affluent, middle-class bedroom community and day trip destination, seven miles on the ferry from downtown Seattle. The island has a population of about 23,000, 5.5 percent unemployment, and the median housing price is below $500,000. Less well known is the island's role as an incubator for young and talented loud rock musicians. The suburban cocktail of teenage angst, plastic prosperity, and free time that makes angry young musicians pop up like mushrooms after a spring rain is hardly unique to Bainbridge, but the island has those ingredients in excess. What's special about Bainbridge hardcore is the scene's longevity. For more than 30 years, a metamorphosing network of house shows helmed by high-school teenagers has produced well-loved bands and musicians, many of whom never make a dent in the mainland musical consciousness—though some, like the radically unalike Murder City Devils and Holy Ghost Revival, have. The island lists Chad Channing (formerly of Nirvana), Andrew Wood (Malfunkshun, Mother Love Bone), and Ben Shepherd (Soundgarden) among its famous alumni. Governor Jay Inslee is also a Bainbridge native, but nobody can confirm ever seeing him at a house show.
posted by josher71 on Nov 11, 2015 - 9 comments

Chip Punks

The slowed-down Chipmunks are brilliant and terrifying... The "original" Chipmunks cover of Call Me vs the slowed-down version
posted by GuyZero on Nov 2, 2015 - 85 comments

Hüsker Dü - top-shelf Land Speed Record-era live footage

Hüsker Dü were caught on tape on September 5, 1981 at the 7th St Entry, Minneapolis, MN, blazing through a familiar set they'd recorded weeks earlier for Land Speed Record. Set 1

The real surprise is when they returned to the stage later that night to showcase the slower, more melodic side of the band, complete with four unreleased tracks. Set 2. [more inside]
posted by porn in the woods on Oct 16, 2015 - 17 comments

I'm not crazy. You're the one who's crazy.

What the American people are angry about is they understand that they did not cause this recession. Teachers did not cause this recession. Firefighters and police officers who are being attacked daily by governors all over this country did not cause this recession. Construction workers did not cause this recession. This recession was caused by a few so-called punk and hardcore bands who charged obscene door cover and priced their merch like it was goddamned Prada—Bernie Sanders (I–VT).
Bernie is hardcore. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Sep 29, 2015 - 39 comments

Yankees Suck

The twisted, true story of the drug-addled, beer-guzzling hardcore punks who made the most popular T-shirts in Boston history.
posted by zamboni on Sep 4, 2015 - 42 comments

Life – simple life – is always right.

"Life does not have a narrative arc. The world does not have a narrative arc. Or if it does, it’s bigger than anything we could ever fucking write about." An unusually great, philosophical interview with punk/DIY legend Ian MacKaye on self-preservation, digital obsession and finding your life tree trunk.
posted by naju on Aug 24, 2015 - 13 comments

surviving in a hungry sea of white noise

Brooklyn's Afropunk festival has gone from a small gathering of friends celebrating an underground documentary to a massive, celebrated boutique fashion and mainstream music cornucopia. Some say they have sold out. But in Pitchfork, author Hanif Abdurraqib, (previously) makes a case that it still represents something very real and important to black youth culture.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Aug 21, 2015 - 9 comments

in glorious 4:3 video

Watch noisy Texas power pop band Radioactivity play two songs in an abandoned shopping mall. [more inside]
posted by item on Jul 21, 2015 - 17 comments

Zee! Ee! Arr! Oh! Zee! Ee! Arr! Oh!

Ryan Richardson has recently digitised and made available the entire run of Slash, an LA punk magazine, which ran from 1977 to 1980. [more inside]
posted by frimble on Jul 7, 2015 - 13 comments

A T O M I C !

Top Of The Pops - The Story 0f 1980 [SLYT]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 27, 2015 - 30 comments

"Mr. The Plague, he's around, and one of my friends hollers at him"

Hackers was a financial flop, but its hilariously over-the-top early CGI visuals, oddly prescient view on technology, and glam-cyberpunk aesthetic rendered it a cult classic. To honor its 20th anniversary—at a time dogged by newfound fears about what the future of technology holds—we thought it would be fitting to bring together a group of actual hackers to screen and discuss the film. - Hackers watch "Hackers"
posted by Artw on Jun 26, 2015 - 89 comments

Slits/Sarah Jaffe

Why Feminism Needs Punk
posted by josher71 on May 22, 2015 - 14 comments

"There needs to be sound solidarity between people of color in general"

"If you look at the history of rock and roll and punk, they came from a black style of music, and that’s the history of popular music in general. It was created by blacks, then re-recorded to play for a white audience. Some of the first punk bands to ever create the 1977 sound were all-black bands."
- Monica Estrella Negra, in an interview about the Black & Brown Punk Collective [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana on May 14, 2015 - 20 comments

Hardcore Architecture

"Hardcore Architecture explores the relationship between the architecture of living spaces and the history of underground American hardcore bands in the 1980s."
posted by Sokka shot first on May 13, 2015 - 18 comments

"I don’t need to defend my credentials."

Imagining a Safer Space: Building Community & Ending Harassment in Punk
I recently got harassed in a pretty terrifying way at a punk venue in Austin, Texas. I used my experience as inspiration for a piece that examines why and how harassers are allowed to continue operating within the punk community, as well as how to establish community norms that holds them accountable for their actions.
[via mefi projects]
posted by griphus on Apr 28, 2015 - 36 comments

The Best of Black Punk Rock, in My Humble Opinion

Shotgun Seamstress of Maximum Rocknroll on the best of black punk rock.
posted by josher71 on Apr 21, 2015 - 20 comments

Armageddon as Autogeddon

Mad Max: ‘Punk’s Sistine Chapel’ – A Ballardian Primer
posted by Artw on Apr 12, 2015 - 28 comments

Phranc talk (with a P-H and a hard C)

Phranc, the self-described "All-American Jewish Lesbian Folksinger" has been a little quiet lately, but she's back with a new website and a new instrumental song. And if that wasn't enough, her entire solo catalog is now available on Bandcamp. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 3, 2015 - 8 comments

Rediscovering San Francisco's Punk Scene in a Box of Old Negatives

In the late 70s, John Roberts was a visual arts major at San Francisco's Institute of Art who spent his free time documenting the Bay Area's blossoming punk scene. His photos—a mix of street photography, portraiture, and concert shots—uniquely captured the last moments of the city's pre-AIDS and post-hippie era. Roberts's best shots were from a tiny punk venue called the Deaf Club on Valencia Street. The Deaf Club was a deaf community center that hosted hardcore shows from 1978 to 1980—the resulting scene was grungy, sweaty, and truly bizarre, and Roberts's photos captured it perfectly.
posted by rtha on Mar 1, 2015 - 16 comments

From the golden age of hypertext

The Big Fun Glossary: “Big Fun began its life as the home of the Malvern Girls, three young adults from the Philadelphia Suburbs. From its initial disastrous housewarming and continuing on through the worst winter on record and into a spring infested with ticks, flies and cicadas, Big Fun, a stately yellow farmhouse in rural Central Virginia, saw many interesting sights: impromptu punk rock concerts, Dextromethorphan chug-fests, Nomadic Festivals, nazi skinheads, and (most importantly) record alcohol consumption. Like most tight social groups, Big Fun had its own language, history and collection of in-jokes. This website is designed to grant you access to the inner workings of this remarkable youth culture as it actually functioned in the mid-90s.” [more inside]
posted by smammy on Feb 14, 2015 - 18 comments

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