83 posts tagged with PunkRock.
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40 years of partying like a punkette

The Story of Feminist Punk in 33 Songs: From Patti Smith to Bikini Kill, the songs that have crushed stereotypes and steered progress (Pitchfork). More than a list of songs, it's an overview of feminist expression through raw music, from 1975 to 2015, with an introduction by Vivien Goldman. "Because nothing beats jamming and singing with your sisters. That is punk. Punk freed female musicians. It is yours. Sing it, play it, live it now." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 12, 2016 - 48 comments

EMI: the inside story of Britain's biggest music company

Electric & Musical Industries was formed in 1931, initially releasing classical music, but went on to launch the Beatles, who changed the record label's operations and funded the company for years and years. The label's recording rules were further broadened by Queen and Pink Floyd. EMI ushered punk into the mainstream with Sex Pistols, and then embraced the New Romanticism and the polished excesses of Duran Duran. They made music videos big with Pet Shop Boys and made Brit Pop a thing with Blur, and were home to Radiohead. This is the inside story of EMI, one of the greatest British brands in recording history, as told by people involved with the record label's storied history, augmented by company and performance footage. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 5, 2016 - 14 comments

Do your parents know you're Ramones??

"Bloodlines make bonds irrefutable. You might hate your brother for what he's done, but you can't undo the blood; he's still your brother, you're his. A makeshift family, the kind many bands construct, may seem easier to leave behind. It's a musical partnership, a fraternity at best. But the bonds can be just as indelible, as sublime, as painful." -- The Curse of the Ramones by Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone
posted by Room 641-A on May 21, 2016 - 6 comments

History Lesson - Part II

On the 15th anniversary of its publication, The A.V. Club interviews author Michael Azerrad and others on the creation and impact of Our Band Could Be Your Life. [more inside]
posted by soundguy99 on Apr 10, 2016 - 14 comments

You're able to move on and have a great day

Las hijas de Violencia are responding to street harassment in Mexico using confetti guns and punk rock. AJ+ has made a short video showing how las hijas are bringing their song Sexista Punk to the streets.
posted by roolya_boolya on Jan 27, 2016 - 6 comments

I just wanna do it all surprise!

Hilariously bad Spanish covers of the Sex Pistols, circa 1978. Behold: Anarchy in the UK. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Jan 3, 2016 - 29 comments

“…if you use a razor blade and glue; you can change the whole world.”

The Art of Punk (previously) is a documentary series from MOCAtv, the L.A. Museum of Contemporary Arts’ YoutTube channel. The series looks at the visual language of the punk rock movement by focussing on three legendary punk rock bands and the seminal artists behind their iconic logos. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Dec 1, 2015 - 4 comments

I fought the law, and the law won (unless it didn't)

Outlaw songs are at least as old as popular music itself. The image of a gallant loner battling a rigid and unyielding legal establishment has proved irresistible for generations of songwriters. In 1959, Texan Sonny Curtis wrote one of the best, "I Fought The Law." Intended as a vehicle for himself and the post-Buddy Holly Crickets, their single went precisely nowhere.
That is, until it was covered -- the first hit cover was by The Bobby Fuller Four in 1965, then another major version came out 14 years later, from The Clash who revived the "oldie" into what is now a "punk anthem." From there, the covers start piling up.... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 11, 2015 - 29 comments

surviving in a hungry sea of white noise

Brooklyn's Afropunk festival has gone from a small gathering of friends celebrating an underground documentary to a massive, celebrated boutique fashion and mainstream music cornucopia. Some say they have sold out. But in Pitchfork, author Hanif Abdurraqib, (previously) makes a case that it still represents something very real and important to black youth culture.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Aug 21, 2015 - 9 comments

"There needs to be sound solidarity between people of color in general"

"If you look at the history of rock and roll and punk, they came from a black style of music, and that’s the history of popular music in general. It was created by blacks, then re-recorded to play for a white audience. Some of the first punk bands to ever create the 1977 sound were all-black bands."
- Monica Estrella Negra, in an interview about the Black & Brown Punk Collective [more inside]
posted by Juliet Banana on May 14, 2015 - 20 comments

That's Not What Joe Strummer Had in Mind

​​"From the pictures and videos that accompany the NBC News and Buzzfeed stories, the crowd appears to have been predominantly white... which explains why they're described in the media as 'celebrating' rather than 'rioting'. But every time this happens – that is to say, every time sports fans, predominantly of the white variety, go on rampages after wining (or losing) various championships – many of us with a few gray hairs on our heads are reminded of the Clash's seminal punk anthem, 'White Riot,' which was released as a 7-inch single (that would be on vinyl, kids) in March 1977, and was later included on both the UK and the US versions of the band's debut album, The Clash."​ Whites Riot: That’s Not What Joe Strummer Had in Mind, by David Von Ebers (TwiB! / Valid magazine).
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 19, 2015 - 28 comments

Never Mind the Baubles

Anarchy in Huddersfield: the day the Sex Pistols played Santa [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Dec 24, 2014 - 6 comments

They still do not sell t-shirts.

27 years after their recording, Fugazi gives their first set of demos an official release. Alternative Press checks in with an appreciation (with SoundCloud streams of the entire release). The Washington Post recounts the band's early years. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Nov 21, 2014 - 37 comments

Success is the thing that kills bands. We haven't had any success.

So there's this UK punk band. First wavers, '77. Cohorts of Gang of Four (whose pictures were inadvertently printed on the back of their first album). Rivals of The Clash, to whom their first single was an answer record. Their energy is so gregarious, their working-class politics so pointed but relatable, they make a mark for themselves despite the limitation of barely being able to play. They get to the part where they're supposed to break up or fade away. Instead, they learn to play, to play very well, even. They become an ever-shifting collective, picking up new members, people from The Rolling Stones, or people who'd played with The Buzzcocks, Elvis Costello, The Cure. They made roaring post-punk records, shimmering power pop, pint-raising Irish/British folk, and booze-saturated country records. They found a fascination with folk music, American country music in particular. Actually, they may have accidentally invented alt-country. Lester Bangs says they're "The most revolutionary group in the history of rock n' roll." Hyperbole? Nah. Hyperbole was when he called them "better than the Beatles." 37 years in, they're still making records that odds are, you either love dearly, or have never heard of at all. They're The Mekons, friend, and Joe Angio's new documentary looks at them in all of their shambling, lovable, raucous glory. [more inside]
posted by DirtyOldTown on Oct 30, 2014 - 39 comments

Anarchy in the Pre-K

Martha Stewart Living inspires parents to throw a Punk Rock Inspired Party for their children. Instead of advising parents to hijack the school's photocopier and use ransom-note letters from shoplifted magazines for invites; to get their child's mohawk ready to withstand the "nosh pit" with a fresh shave and white glue; perhaps piercing their cherubic cheeks with a safety pins; or even offering lessons in gobbing on the entertainment, the author suggests serving Spinach Ricotta Skulls and printing the sheet music of your favourite punk song on fondant-covered cupcakes. It's no wonder that the real party is in the comments.
posted by peagood on Oct 24, 2014 - 106 comments

"punk rock changed our lives"

Minutemen jam econo on a public access TV show called Acoustic Blowout in 1985. You can find more Minutemen videos and concert recordings on corndogs.org.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 6, 2014 - 18 comments

It's Chocolate Milk For Me!

Elvis Costello and The Attractions on tour in 1978, go grocery shopping with Geraldo Rivera.

Carry on.
posted by timsteil on Apr 25, 2014 - 43 comments

Turn that camera OFF

The Jon Spenser Blues Explosion was (is) a groundbreaking rock and roll band (not a blues band) well known for its live performances. Not much video footage of their concerts is extant, but this performance on an Australian TV show in 1994 is pretty typical, if the word "typical" is suitable for someone trying to incite a riot. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Apr 6, 2014 - 39 comments

"I guess I’m an artist. That’s my super power."

A short and sweet 10-minute documentary on musician and artist Daniel Johnston. [SLYT] [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 6, 2014 - 14 comments

Dance, romance, everyone's so happy

The shoe company Vans has just released several episodes of a documentary series called Living Off The Wall that follows teens (including Nekro, the singer from skacore band Proyekto Makabro) who are active in the energetic (and storied) East LA backyard punk scene. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 3, 2014 - 7 comments

A bigger threat to our way of life than Russian Communism

Brass Tacks, a BBC documentary / studio discussion programme from 1977, looks at the burgeoning phenomena of punk rock. (SLYT)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Nov 16, 2013 - 11 comments

Ian Rubbish Sits Down With the Clash

The Last Gang in Town. Punk rock legends Paul Simonon and Mick Jones of the Clash sit down with Ian Rubbish of the Bizarros and talk of old times and how Ian was inspired by each Clash album. They then get together and jam an old Bizarros tune.
posted by NoMich on Oct 16, 2013 - 11 comments

Ziggy Ziggy Sputnik

The Day My Kid Went Punk Afterschool Special - Teen decides to make himself noticed from the rest of the crowd by becoming a Punk Rocker (SLYT)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Oct 15, 2013 - 43 comments

20 years, black cat, black cat

It's been twenty years since Dante Ferrando opened the Black Cat Club on 14th St in DC. The neighborhood has changed immeasurably, but the music is still going.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 13, 2013 - 17 comments

X-Acto-Mundo: Winston Smith

The Art of Punk: Winston Smith, collage artist. [SLYT]
posted by Rykey on Aug 13, 2013 - 5 comments

BS 2000, the merging of punk rock, hip-hop, and a bunch of keyboards.

BS 2000 was the short-time collaboration between Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz of the Beastie Boys, and Amery "AWOL" Smith, best known as a punk drummer. They released a couple albums on the now-defunct Grand Royal label. They toured live, performing with the keyboards, drums and vocals (YouTube) that was the sound of punk rock and hip-hop combined into something funky and weird (Grooveshark stream). Bestie Mania has more on the band. Oh, and Adam and Amery shared their record collection on WFMU back in the day, so the show is only available in Real Media.
posted by filthy light thief on Jul 2, 2013 - 9 comments

Meiecundim​eesükskor​sakovläk​seilelätti

The most insane Eurovision contest performance you'll ever see, courtesy of Winny Puhh with their song Meiecundimees üks Korsakov läks eile Lätti. [more inside]
posted by MaryDellamorte on Mar 29, 2013 - 76 comments

Welcome To New Wave Theatre

In 1980, director David Jove created New Wave Theatre, an L.A.-based music show showcasing live performances by California hardcore punk rock bands. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Jan 3, 2013 - 14 comments

IT'S ALRIIIIGHT! IT'S OKAAAY! I'M MATT MOTHERFUCKING DIECKMAN!

I WAS CONCEIVED! ON THE EVE! OF THE FOURTH OF JULYYYYY!
WHEN MY DADDY DIED, YOU COULD HEAR THE BALD EAGLES CALL HIS NAME!


AT THE END OF THE DAY, YOU GET OFF, YOU GET PAID!
YOU GO OUT, AND BUY THINGS FOR ONLY NINETY-NINE CENTS!


HEY! HOT BITCHES! GIVE ME SOME PUSSAY!

LE-VIT-RA VERSUS VIAG-RA!

— Memorable moments from the songs of Phil Buckman, AKA I Hate You When You're Pregnant. All his songs are available for free here. [more inside]
posted by Rory Marinich on Dec 30, 2012 - 15 comments

Happy holidays, everyone!

It's A Bad Brains Christmas, Charlie Brown (SLVimeo)
posted by BitterOldPunk on Dec 8, 2012 - 27 comments

Blood, Guts, and Pussy

The DwarvesNSFW have been playing their variety of shockpunk for more than 25 years. Their stage showsNSFW and album coversNSFW are infamous for their nudity, dwarfsploitation, and glorification of violence (though they only manage #8 on the list of 10 most offensive punk rock album covers of all timeoh so very NSFW). And yet, despite the fact that sock rock does not traditionally demand much musically, they are really frigging amazingSFW, SFW, NSFW.
posted by 256 on Sep 17, 2012 - 28 comments

Live From New York's All Right if You Like Saxophones

Thanks to lobbying from John Belushi, on Halloween night, 1981, LA punk band Fear played a set on Saturday Night Live. The New York Post headline the next day read "FEAR Riot Leaves Saturday Night Glad To Be Alive.” [more inside]
posted by Bookhouse on Jul 13, 2012 - 65 comments

No fear! No indecision! Rage against the system of the oppressors!

Punks Not Dead.... but it can get you killed. Punk rock in oppresive regimes.
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Mar 18, 2012 - 8 comments

No future

Punk's Not Dead. The revival of punk in couture fashion and elsewhere
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 9, 2012 - 113 comments

The Chelsea Hotel of NYC, surviving The Great Depression, fires, deaths, but maybe not a change of ownership

Late July 2011, would-be guests of the historic and storied Chelsea Hotel (also known as Hotel Chelsea or simply The Chelsea) were informed on their reservations were suddenly canceled, in preparation for a year-long renovation project, which some people speculate is a union-busting strategy. Given the concerns for the future of The Chelsea, some came to throw last-minute parties, while long-term tenants held more somber gatherings. On August 1st, current guests were abruptly escorted out, increasing anxieties about the plans of the new owner, elusive real estate investor Joseph Chetrit. Even if this is the end of the era, the hotel's long and varied legacy lives on ... [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 6, 2011 - 47 comments

Die! Die! My Darling!

Few bands have undergone as many reinventions as the Misfits (no, not those Misfits). Formed in New Jersey in 1977 by Glenn Danzig (vocals and keyboard), Jerry Only (bass) and Manny Martinez (drums), the original lineup played at CBGB and released one unclassifiable guitar-less rock single. In late '77 guitarist Franché Coma was brought on and Martinez was kicked out of the band in favor of a drummer named Mr. Jim. With this lineup, their sound began to take on a more defined sound, merging with the developing second wave of North American punk rock. [more inside]
posted by 256 on Dec 1, 2010 - 58 comments

"Lurries. Containers that deliver your fucking food to your fucking house, alright?"

Two classic contentious discussions featuring the great Mark E Smith: discussing Situationism [wiki] with Tony Wilson, Stewart Home, and Jon King, 1996; discussing Nietzsche, acid house, and other topics with Nick Cave and Shane McGowan, 1989. [more inside]
posted by koeselitz on Nov 23, 2010 - 19 comments

National Book Award Winner Patti Smith

Patti Smith, best known as a singer-songwriter (whose lyrics have occasionally been collected into books of poetry) has won the National Book Award in Nonfiction for Just Kids, her memoir of the years she spent living with the late artist Robert Mapplethorpe.
posted by aught on Nov 18, 2010 - 54 comments

If Henry Rollins thinks you have too many tattoos, you might be a hipster

Henry Rollins and Iranian artist Shirin Nishat visit NYC's Cake Shop, where a young woman acknowledges Rollins's presence by shouting a "very famous" catch-phrase of his at him. Hilarity ensues (language NSFW).
posted by kittens for breakfast on Nov 7, 2010 - 192 comments

where were you in 1992?

Eric Davidson, lead singer of the New Bomb Turks, has written a book exploring a much-overlooked and oft-imitated genre that he dubs Gunk Punk. We Never Learn came out June 1st 2010. [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Jul 12, 2010 - 15 comments

Over The Edge

The Wipers were a tight and catchy post-punk band founded in Portland in 1977. Today they're best known for covers by The Vivian Girls and Nirvana (Return of the Rat, and esp. D7 - studio, live 1 2 3 4). But the originals are pretty interesting too. John Peel said of their first album "Is It Real": " 'It is one of punk's great albums by perhaps the most unappreciated band of all time'." [more inside]
posted by msalt on Jun 6, 2010 - 23 comments

Creatively Heinous

Toronto band Fucked Up was everywhere at the South By Southwest music festival this year--playing at official and unofficial showcases, even once on the street, but often at unofficial massive advertising areas by, say, Pepsi or Levis. Some might think: How can a hardcore band justify their position in these marketing schemes? The answer, posted on the band blog by Mike the Guitarist, is simply titled: SXSW WHY? [more inside]
posted by Potomac Avenue on Mar 26, 2010 - 47 comments

Female-Fronted Punk Rock

Female-Fronted Punk Rock 1977-1989. A huge, 12 (!) disc, mix of punk rock sung by women.
posted by OmieWise on Mar 12, 2010 - 43 comments

No one will ever have proof of the precious deeds that I achieve

How Crucifucks frontman Doc Dart became a man named 26 [more inside]
posted by generalist on Feb 23, 2010 - 17 comments

That Ain't The Way To Behave

Oil City Confidential is a new film from director Julien Temple, previously responsible for The Filth and the Fury, about the Sex Pistols, and Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten, focusing on Strummer and The Clash. This time round, in a kind of prequel to both those films, he tackles the life and turbulent times of Dr. Feelgood. Finding fame on the same Pub rock circuit (as remembered by writer and Kursaal Flyers drummer Will Birch) that also supported Ian Dury's Kilburn and the High Roads (not to mention Eddie and the Hot Rods and Joe Strummer's pre-Clash band The 101ers), Dr. Feelgood played stripped-down, taut and aggressive R&B. Hailing from the wildlands of Essex's Canvey Island – the "Oil City" of the film's title – Dr Feelgood were punk before punk really hit, a whirlwind of raucous energy, with a fierce work ethic. In Wilko Johnson, they had a guitarist with a scorching, slash and burn technique, while their singer, Lee Brilleaux (1989 interview), who died of cancer in 1994, aged just 41, oozed cheap-suited menace, and, into the bargain, helped found Stiff Records. [more inside]
posted by Len on Jan 27, 2010 - 9 comments

He was a friend of mine

Jim Carroll has died. Avant-garde writer, punk rocker, doped-up downtown scenester, never-made-it schoolyard hoop-dreamer. He couldn't have expected to live to see a master's thesis in English at San Diego State written about his journal/novel The Basketball Diaries, or to be interviewed by Jon Stewart about being played by Leo DiCaprio in the movie of his (early) life. [more inside]
posted by escabeche on Sep 13, 2009 - 124 comments

Falling James Lives

In 1980 you begin one of the great unsung pre-grunge punk bands of all time; you dress in drag, run for president, and appear on Jerry Springer; The Bangles write a song about you in 1984; you get married to Courtney Love in 1989 (pre-Kurt) and produce Hole's first record; in 1987 your band releases a sloppy seminal masterpiece with a memorable title, and the label (SST) has a display contest for stores; you write for the LA Weekly; you're Falling James Moreland of the Leaving Trains, legend of the L.A. underground music scene.
posted by ornate insect on May 17, 2009 - 20 comments

It's The Ones Who've Cracked That The Light Shines Through

Jeffrey Lewis brings you The Complete History of Punk Rock and Its Development on the Lower East Side (1950-1975) in eight and a half minutes. [more inside]
posted by StopMakingSense on Feb 27, 2008 - 24 comments

New York is such a pity but at Max's Kansas City we won

Max's Kansas City closed 25 years ago this night. Although Hilly Kristal's CBGB's is more iconic and perhaps better known today, Mickey Ruskin's Max's Kansas City (and its infamous back room) was every bit as important to fostering the punk scene of the late 1970s and early 80s. Located a 213 Park Avenue South, just up the street from historic Union Square, Max's played host to the Heartbreakers, Bruce Springsteen, the Ramones, Wayne/Jayne County and the Fast, the New York Dolls, and quite a few others. What's standing there today? Why, the 213 Park Avenue South Deli, of course.
posted by psmealey on Dec 31, 2007 - 26 comments

Sometimes I think nothing is simple but the feeling of pain.

The White Noise Supremacists: Lester Bangs on race, words, post-punk, and society. [more inside]
posted by koeselitz on Dec 17, 2007 - 57 comments

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