709 posts tagged with Radio.
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What gravity?

Tareq Alsaadi performs gravity-defying aerobatics with the SAB Goblin Nitro radio-controlled helicopter — in one case, with some interesting LED patterns on the blades
posted by a lungful of dragon on Apr 29, 2016 - 12 comments

The Road Home

“Treated right, poems don't just ‘work’ on radio, they can rock your world.” The Road Home, Bob Chelmick’s weekly broadcast of poetry and music, is perfect for winding down on Sunday night (and do male voices get more relaxing?). Each month the Road Home website cycles through 27 hours of past shows (playlist). Or listen to the live program on Sundays at 8-10 pm MST via the CKUA website. About Bob Chelmick.
posted by sylvanshine on Apr 10, 2016 - 4 comments

The time is just coming up to...very late indeed.

All 29 episodes of That Mitchell and Webb Sound, the radio precursor to David Mitchell and Robert Webb's celebrated television sketch show. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Mar 15, 2016 - 17 comments

"...one of the scariest things they saw as children."

Children of the Stones (previously) is the revolutionary 1977 British children's television drama telling the story of an astrophysicist and his son who arrive in the village of Milbury to study the giant Neolithic stones which surround it, and the community which is held in a strange captivity by the psychic forces generated by the stones. For BBC Radio, writer and comedian Stewart Lee explores the ground breaking television series and examines its special place in the memories of those children who watched it on its initial transmission in a state of excitement and terror. [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Mar 4, 2016 - 70 comments

Radio 2.0?

Anchor, which seems to be to audio what Twitter is to writing or Instagram to photography, launched a few days ago as a new "truly public" radio where everyone can contribute and comment. [more inside]
posted by cubby on Feb 12, 2016 - 35 comments

But where one empire crumbles, another rises

Alan Partridge: I don’t need TV, I’ve got two Nutribullets
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Feb 7, 2016 - 11 comments

Down these mean streets a man must go

Full cast radio adaptations of The Big Sleep, The Lady in the Lake, Farewell My Lovely, The Long Goodbye, The High Window, and three more Raymond Chandler mysteries. Starring Toby Stephens as Philip Marlowe.
posted by Iridic on Feb 5, 2016 - 32 comments

On a collision course with earth

When Bat Guano created "The Bat Guano's SwaG! Radio Program," he used ingredients specially blended for listenability. All of the notes created by the finest musicians are in most of the songs he broadcasts. Genres are mixed and matched, compared and contrasted, hitting all the seasons that make it lively for the ears’ tongue. Then it is all lightly breaded and personally dipt in Ranch Dressing by your server, Bat Guano.
SwaG's decades-long run on Western Michigan University's radio station WIDR FM will be ending tonight with a final broadcast from 9:00-11:00 EST, streaming Here or Here. In the mean time, you can listen to the archive on Bat Guano's website. If you're feeling spookey, start with a Halloween episode. More romantic? Valentines ep, right here. otherwise jump right in to any one of his Timeless Broadcasts [more inside]
posted by rebent on Feb 3, 2016 - 5 comments

Every year I expect it to be less foolish, and every year it is more so.

RIP Sir Terry Wogan, Irish radio and television presenter whose long career at the BBC included many notable shows including Wake up to Wogan, the Wogan chatshow, Blankety Blank and The Eurovision Song Contest. [more inside]
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Jan 31, 2016 - 51 comments

The Preservation Of A Nation

Robbie Judkins visits Tanzania to witness first hand the attempt to save a quarter of a century of musical history from oblivion. Listen to an exclusive mix of tracks newly digitized by the Tanzania Heritage Project
posted by infini on Jan 13, 2016 - 5 comments

“No Santa Claus! Thank God! he lives, and he lives forever.”

"Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus" [Wiki]
"Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus" is a phrase from an editorial called Is There a Santa Claus?. The editorial appeared in the September 21, 1897, edition of The (New York) Sun and has since become part of popular Christmas folklore in the United States. It is the most reprinted editorial in any English-language newspaper.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Dec 21, 2015 - 81 comments

"Folks at NPR thought, 'Oh good grief, we're selling out to Hollywood.'"

In 1981, NPR affiliate station KUSC hatched a bold plan to adapt George Lucas’ Star Wars for radio. Easily the most visual film of the last decade, Star Wars as a listening experience seemed like an unlikely idea, but Lucas sold them the rights to adapt the hit movie for one dollar, and opened the Lucasfilm vaults to the show’s producers: Star Wars sound effects would be available to them in their raw form, along with every note of John Williams’ music. The cast was a mixture of original Star Wars cast members, Hollywood veterans, and future TV and movie stars still in the early stages of their careers. Novelist Brian Daley and Director John Madden then turned the first three films into "movies to watch with your eyes closed." [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 20, 2015 - 46 comments

“Perhaps the next time you hear from me I’ll be dead,”

Dead Air: The Philippines is one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a journalist, especially if you’re in talk radio. [The California Sunday Magazine] By Saul Elbein Photographs by Jes Aznar
When Elgin Damasco’s radio talk show was over, his bodyguards would hustle him out of his fortified studio and into his car. They would drive him through the leafy streets of Puerto Princesa, capital of the western Philippine province of Palawan, and bring him home. There he would hunker down until morning. Police had warned him that men had been casing his house. “I don’t even have the freedom to go to the mall,” Damasco told me. Inside the cinder-block walls of his studio, the cherubic 32-year-old felt safe. His sonorous voice was hooked into the most powerful transmitter on Palawan island. He was charging forth, as his station ID went, “to defend the weak and criticize the corrupt.” From 4:00 to 5:30 weekday afternoons, no one could shut him up.
posted by Fizz on Dec 18, 2015 - 3 comments

Stepping Out at The Cross-Dressers’ Ball

The Seahorse Society of New South Wales is a support organization for transvestites. While it has been around since 1971, this year marks the first time that press has been invited to the annual ball. William Verity reports for A(ustralian) Broadcasting Corporations’s Earshot:
posted by Going To Maine on Nov 30, 2015 - 4 comments

"I would maybe compare it to... it's like a light monkey's paw."

"There's a snideness about it that is in keeping with the experience and the inner life of being a certain kind of teenager. It's very anti-earnest. There was a moment after the period where that song came out where everything was humorless and grotesque. But after that, it seems like what happened was that everything got pretty earnest." Why Harvey Danger's '90s alt-rock hit "Flagpole Sitta" endures. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Nov 11, 2015 - 115 comments

Pastor Dick comes to you

Over 30 years of Over The Edge radio episodes have been made available on archive.org. Starting in 1981, Over the Edge ran weekly on KPFA until the death of host (and Negativland contributor) Don Joyce. Stream-of-consciousness audio collages punctuated topical themes that would extend over many episodes. [more inside]
posted by Jessica Savitch's Coke Spoon on Nov 7, 2015 - 23 comments

The sound of horror

The Stone Tape is a television play, first broadcast on the BBC as a Christmas ghost story back in 1972. It was written by Nigel Kneale, best known as the writer of Quatermass. BBC radio is broadcasting a new adaptation tonight (along with an adaptation of The Ring)
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Oct 31, 2015 - 14 comments

Suspense, X Minus One, Lights Out! Mercury Theatre and more...

The AV Club provides 13 Old Time Radio dramas to scare the pants off you this Halloween
posted by The Whelk on Oct 26, 2015 - 15 comments

The Message

Robin: And just to clarify, Nicky, your recording equipment is live right now, yeah?
Nicky: Yes.
Robin: So if, Perry, you really meant what you said about this being declassified, you won't mind saying it right now.
Col. Eubanks: Can we sit down first, or...?
Robin: Right after you repeat the thing. On the record.
Col. Eubanks: The NSA would like to hire Cypher to decode a message we have reason to believe was transmitted by an extraterrestrial. Now can we sit down?

The Message Podcast, Episode One [more inside]
posted by davidjmcgee on Oct 26, 2015 - 26 comments

The Price of Fear

Between 1973 and 1983, Vincent Price starred in twenty-two episodes of radio horror for the BBC. Price claimed the stories were drawn from his own reminiscences, though certain plots bear strong resemblances to classic pieces by Roald Dahl and Bram Stoker. Click on and listen, if you can afford...THE PRICE OF FEAR. [more inside]
posted by Iridic on Oct 23, 2015 - 18 comments

You're saying "Khaleesi" wrong.

Building the languages of Game of Thrones.
posted by curious nu on Oct 2, 2015 - 15 comments

Corresponding with the world

BBC Radio's From Our Own Correspondent (previously on Metafilter) turns 60 this month. To celebrate, they've released several special editions: the first ever UK edition; a discussion panel on foreign reporting's past, present and future (includes a thoughtful discussion of how much a reporter's personal point of view should inform their reporting); and a compilation of notable stories from the past 60 years.
posted by une_heure_pleine on Sep 23, 2015 - 6 comments

Because we're young and we're reckless; Parting is such sweet sorrow.

Famed Shakespearean actor Sir Patrick Stewart recently appeared on NPR to perform a dramatic rendition of T. A. Swift's classic work, Blank Space.
posted by schmod on Sep 16, 2015 - 19 comments

Baba Booey Concurs

The 32 Greatest Talk-Show Hosts Ever, as ranked by Vulture
posted by The Gooch on Sep 14, 2015 - 83 comments

This woman is my destiny

As the video on YouTube reaches 100 million views, Shut Up and Dance by the Cincinnati band Walk the Moon continues to sell and receive frequent radio airplay. [more inside]
posted by Wordshore on Sep 9, 2015 - 71 comments

Women geeking out about geeky women

Reclaiming the Nerdiverse [NSFW audio] is a fascinating hour-long discussion about women in science fiction and fantasy on the late night edition of the venerable BBC radio show Woman's Hour (podcast link). The host is Lauren Laverne, and her guests are author and game designer Naomi Alderman, journalist Helen Lewis, sociologist Linda Woodhead, fantasy novelist Zen Cho, and cosplayer and writer Lucy Saxon. The discussion takes in everything from 70s feminist writers to alpha/beta/omega slash fiction to cosplay etiquette to geek sexism. The Late Night Woman's Hour has been the topic of some discussion in Britain.
posted by Kattullus on Sep 3, 2015 - 33 comments

Nobody knows what the hell they're doing.

CBC Radio's WireTap is saying farewell. In this special video message, people of all ages offer words of wisdom to their younger counterparts.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 21, 2015 - 12 comments

Remembering Bobbi Campbell

Thirty two years ago this weekend, Bobbi Campbell and his partner, Bobby Hilliard appeared on the cover of Newsweek magazine, most notable because the two men, embracing, were living with AIDS. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 9, 2015 - 16 comments

KROQ Freddy Snakeskin On Air, circa 1983

Former DJ Freddy Snakeskin has posted in-studio footage from the glory days of LA's legendary "Rock of the 80s" KROQ FM. [more inside]
posted by teponaztli on Aug 8, 2015 - 29 comments

"Well, here goes something into nothing."

In 2010, nearly fifty years after her death, and more than a hundred years after she became the first person to sing on the radio, the remains of Eugenia Farrar were finally laid to rest. Fittingly, her porcelain memorial urn has her own recording of that first song -- "I Love You Truly" -- etched into its surface using a lathe (similar to the process used for early cylinder recordings). Laura LaPlaca's thoughtful essay -- musing on the materiality of this final remaining artifact of a historic broadcast that otherwise left little trace -- describes this final resting place as Farrar's "ashen physical remains protected by the materialized solid form of her voice." [more inside]
posted by orthicon halo on Jul 28, 2015 - 2 comments

BBC Radio One - Star Special

Hello. This is David Bowie. It's a bit grey out today, but I've got some Perrier water and I've got a bunch of records. I think if I was walking outside at the moment, I'd like to be walking on this street. It's Love Street by The Doors. In May of 1979 Bowie sat down at BBC Radio One and played two hours of his favourite music. [SLYT, track list inside] [more inside]
posted by carsonb on Jul 21, 2015 - 33 comments

Long Time Listener, First Time Caller

Shannon Proudfoot on the joys, sorrows and culture of sports radio. Welcome to sports call-in radio, the world’s cheapest therapy. You don’t have to wait too long for an appointment, and like a 12-step meeting, it’s first names only—and you can even lie about that if you want. There’s no real psychological expertise on offer, but that’s not why anyone tunes in. Call-in radio is, quite literally, about making your voice heard. These shows are their own intense little communities—complete with local celebrities, crackpot street-corner prophets and unwritten etiquette—built on the foundation of obsessive sports fandom.
posted by frimble on Jul 17, 2015 - 27 comments

A Tart My Dears, A Tart

How British Gay Men Used To Talk: A short film featuring Polari, the cult language of UK homosexuals derived from theatre and circus slang, popularized in the 1960s by the camp radio characters Julian and Sandy. Need a dictionary? Or a translated Polari scene from Velvet Goldmine?
posted by The Whelk on Jul 8, 2015 - 48 comments

OBYaVLENIYA KOMANDA 135 [Command 135 initiated]

The radio signal that occupies 4625 kHz has reportedly been broadcasting since the late 1970s. The earliest known recording of it is dated 1982. Ever since curious owners of shortwave radios first discovered the signal, it has broadcast a repeating buzzing noise. Every few years, the buzzer stops, and a Russian voice reads a mixture of numbers and Russian names.
posted by standardasparagus on Jun 15, 2015 - 67 comments

🎶 Stand by your woman 🎶

"So last week, when country radio promoter Keith Hill controversially suggested that stations should stop playing songs by female artists, it’s easy to label his actions another example of misogynistic, conservative politics.

However, Hill’s comments are actually indicative of something much bigger and far more troubling: the consolidation of an entire genre of music, and the type of environment this can create. In the case of country, it’s allowed for the repurposing of the genre’s history, and the exclusion of certain individuals."
The Conversation's Clifford Murphy, on why [country radio promoter] Keith Hill’s comments about women in country music cut far deeper than misogyny [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on Jun 8, 2015 - 106 comments

American Idiocy - Vol.542

A recent study served to confirm the patently obvious: song lyrics for the most popular genres of music are ridiculously obtuse — and getting worse over time. Though this might not be a revelation, the figures are distressing indicators of both an intellectually vapid societal and cultural future as well as its apparent inevitability. [more inside]
posted by philip-random on May 25, 2015 - 186 comments

I Know You Can't Control Yourself Any Longer

What Is 'Mom Rock'?
posted by The Whelk on May 8, 2015 - 166 comments

Anthropology, already read

Déjà Lu republishes locally-selected scholarly articles from journals connected to regional anthropological associations around the world. The result is a PDF-heavy but fascinating collection of long reads on obscure topics. Via. [more inside]
posted by Monsieur Caution on Apr 18, 2015 - 4 comments

Getting What You Paid For

The hidden FM radio inside your pocket -- and why you can't use it. [more inside]
posted by flatluigi on Apr 17, 2015 - 105 comments

Guaranteed puppy free

For her 85th birthday, BBC Radio 4 has broadcast a new interview with and documentary about Ursula K. Le Guin, as well as the first radio dramatisation of The Left Hand of Darkness and a a new Earthsea serial coming soon.
posted by MartinWisse on Apr 13, 2015 - 13 comments

Cette grève est pour vous

For the past three weeks, listeners to France's seven public radio stations have heard little other than music - even on news and speech stations such as France Info and France Inter. The longest strike in the history of Radio France is showing no sign of coming to an end, with both sides becoming more entrenched. [more inside]
posted by winterhill on Apr 9, 2015 - 10 comments

"Can I look at it?" "No, no - you've seen enough of that one..."

Les Paul's 1954 Custom: The One & Only Original by Michael Molenda, Guitar Player. More on Les Paul, and his partnership with Mary Ford, at Gibson.com. YouTube: How High The Moon (1951). [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Mar 28, 2015 - 24 comments

CBS brings you ....SUSPENSE!

Suspense was a thriller-style radio drama that ran on CBS from 1942 to 1962 and is widely considered to be one of the greatest Old Time Radio (or "Golden Age Of Radio") series and model for "The Twilight Zone". In addition to theme music by Bernard Herrmann and scripts by leading mystery authors of the day, Suspense also featured a stunning roll call of big-name Hollywood stars, often playing against type or in more lurid material then the movie studios would allow. While nearly all 947 episodes are available online (exhaustively comprehensive previously) the sheer number of episodes can be daunting. Old Time Radio Review is halfway through the series with a convenient rating system to finding the best - why not enjoy these Youtube versions of a few episodes starring Judy Garland, Lucille Ball, Robert Taylor, Orson Wells, Agnes Moorehead (again), Cary Grant, and more
posted by The Whelk on Mar 12, 2015 - 31 comments

I wonder if he lives in a valley?

The new host of Q has been announced! It's Shad / Shadrach Kabango. Some coverage at the Globe and the Mothership. [more inside]
posted by Lemurrhea on Mar 10, 2015 - 27 comments

Power85 - your source for non-stop synth

Power 85 is non stop streaming of the best dreamwave, synthpop, outrun, and neo retro 80s music, featuring instant requests. (previously)
posted by rebent on Mar 10, 2015 - 20 comments

A New Hope For Radio

The extended NPR produced adaptation of 'A New Hope' for your listening pleasure. [more inside]
posted by bq on Mar 9, 2015 - 13 comments

Radios in museums

Do you like radios? And museums? Then you need the radiomuseum.org gazatteer of museums and historical places around the world where you can look at radios and associated technologies!
posted by carter on Feb 25, 2015 - 8 comments

Now, I can see wifi signals.

Most of us are surrounded by a myriad of radio signals. Some inspired people have taken the opportunity to enable us to see them. Often seemingly random but with a semblance of pattern, the Rayleigh fading model describes much of what you see. via Hacker News
posted by escher on Feb 16, 2015 - 13 comments

Fish and CHiPs all over the place

Maybe you've wondered what a Sig Alert is.
posted by bq on Jan 25, 2015 - 26 comments

"We said, this is something strange, and we need your telescope badly"

January 14, 2005. The Huygens probe was falling to Titan(yt). Released after a seven year trip on Cassini, the tiny lander was mankind's first attempt to land on a moon of another world - and nobody knew what would happen next. Its signals, no more powerful than a walkie-talkie, were to be gathered by the mothership and the science relayed back to Earth. More than a light-hour away back at home planet, radio telescopes were also listening not to decode data - far too weak at that distance, even for the most powerful receivers - but to see whether they could hear Huygens at all. A job for radio engineers, not for heroes. Sometimes, though, you have to be both. [more inside]
posted by Devonian on Jan 14, 2015 - 9 comments

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