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8 Irresistible Food Blogs From Sub-Saharan Africa

Food is life. It unites us all. Here at Global Voices, we love food, so we bring you eight yummy food blogs from Sub-Saharan Africa.
posted by infini on Jul 17, 2014 - 20 comments

I'll have s'mores.

The Girl Scouts published the first recipe for Some Mores in 1927, and it just took off. The s'more has become an All-American campfire treat … and the combination of warm gooey marshmallow, melty chocolate, and crisp graham cracker has inspired a bunch of other s'more-inspired recipes. I give you: Triple dipped apples. Pie. Popcorn. Mini donuts. Stuffed cookies. Dip. Ice cream. Chocolatier ice cream. Homemade pop tarts. Macarons. Cups. Fudge. Krispies Bar. Truffles. Cheesecake. Pie pops. Bites. Milkshake. Empanadas. Trifles. Frozen. [more inside]
posted by julen on Jul 6, 2014 - 25 comments

And the Pulitzer for "Best Recipe" Goes To....

Looking for American recipes to take to tonight's 4th of July party? It's easy to find historic recipes. But why not look to America's great fiction writers instead? [more inside]
posted by magstheaxe on Jul 4, 2014 - 7 comments

The Brewstorian

"With over 200 breweries, Oregon is often considered the craft beer capital of America. Beer geeks and casual drinkers across the country can also thank the state’s farmers for their brews: hops, the essential ingredient that gives beer its bitter flavor, is a rare crop throughout the U.S. but not in Oregon. Last year, Oregon State University established the Oregon Hops & Brewing Archives (OHBA), the first archive in the U.S., dedicated to preserving and telling the intertwined story of hop and beer production and the craft brewing movement. They're posting materials from their collection to Tumblr, Flickr and Zotero.
posted by zarq on May 20, 2014 - 31 comments

strawberry-rosemary-gin peach-thyme-tequila raspberry-lavender-champagne

Three bartenders in a backyard teach you how to make three classic summer drinks on a budget: the daiquiri, the gin & tonic, and the mint julep. Not simple enough? How about the only summer cocktail recipe you will ever need?
posted by Juliet Banana on May 19, 2014 - 105 comments

More than twenty-four varieties of hasperat available!

Hasperat is a well-known spicy Bajoran food resembling a burrito. It is made using a specially prepared brine, which if made correctly causes the eyes to water and sears the tongue. Another method of serving hasperat is in a hasperat soufflé. And now, you can make hasperat at home, or any number of other tasty Star Trek treats!
posted by moink on Mar 16, 2014 - 41 comments

Kickin' it Old School

Each week for a year, the folks in the special collections library at the University of St. Andrews are taking a how-to book from the collection and following its instructions for a project, in order to get a clearer sense of what life was like a century or two ago. Thus far in 52 Weeks of Historical How-Tos, they've learned how to make shoe polish like an 1825 footman, bake mince pie from 10 different recipes dating from 1710-1862, perform parlour tricks to amaze your friends, and take photographs via the wet collodion process.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Mar 9, 2014 - 10 comments

Dishy Literature

This site has the aim of encouraging a wider reading of all types of literature, through a series of recipes inspired (directly or indirectly), by those works. It explores the ways in which descriptions of food are used to elicit meaning for a character trait, a foreign country, or social etiquette. [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Mar 8, 2014 - 6 comments

Dozens of ways to Float

Root Beer Float? Coke Float? Sarsaparilla Float? Oh, there's no shortage of different varieties, and the chemical process is basically the same with all of them. In terms of alcohol, a nice Guiness Float might hit the spot for St Patrick's Day. It has even become possible recently to have a 100% Yuengling Float by combining Yuengling Beer and the re-released Yuengling Ice Cream.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Mar 1, 2014 - 43 comments

OnlyTheBestRecipes.com

OnlyTheBestRecipes.com : The top 1% of recipes from sites like allrecipes, food.com, epicurious, and foodnetwork. [via mefi projects]
posted by feckless fecal fear mongering on Feb 3, 2014 - 51 comments

Gelatin, from calf's hoof jelly to Jell-O, "America's Favorite Dessert"

Gelatin foodstuffs have a long culinary history. The ancient Egyptians made a gelatin-like substance from protein-rich animal materials that they used in their cuisine. It wasn't until the 17th century invention of pressure cooking devices that the process of creating gelatin became significantly less labor and time intensive. The process was refined in the following decades, with the US inventor Peter Cooper filing the patent for Improvement in the preparation of portable gelatine in 1845. He never made much of the patent, and sold it to Pearle B. Wait, who's wife, May Davis Wait, helped turn the gelatin into Jell-O, both naming the product and turning it into a sweet, fruit-flavored dessert. They, too, had no luck selling Jell-O, and sold the patent for $450 to Orator Francis Woodward, who struggled for a period, before turning to marketing to increase interest in the dessert (NYT). By 1902, Jell-O was "America's Favorite Dessert," at least according to the advertisements. And now you know the history of gelatin and Jello. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Feb 2, 2014 - 31 comments

Hotdish!

Starting in 2011, Senator Al Franken (D-MN) has hosted a Minnesota delegation Hotdish competition - a friendly bipartisan and bicameral competition for all of the Minnesota congressional delegates. [more inside]
posted by bibliogrrl on Feb 1, 2014 - 41 comments

Hygienic and Scientific Cooking

"....many a tragic episode in family life is superinduced by the baleful influence of a tortured stomach. Mighty is the hand that holds the ballot-box, but mightier is the hand that wields to advantage the pepper-box, the salt-spoon, and the sugar-shaker." read the entirely of Maud C. Cooke's, Breakfast, Dinner and Supper; or, What To Eat and How To Prepare It (1897) online and enter a world of home remedies, large scale recipes, sound advice, leftover wizardry, squirrel stews, scientific digestion, and horrible things done to vegetables.
posted by The Whelk on Jan 17, 2014 - 12 comments

Is that a banana candle in your pocket...

Liver sausage pineapple? Igloo meat loaf? Tuna Jell-o pie? “21 Truly Upsetting Vintage Recipes” [via Buzzfeed]
posted by LeLiLo on Jan 17, 2014 - 230 comments

"The height of deep-fried achievement"

“It’s a cornmeal dough,” McDaniel says. “You can’t tell me that somebody in the South didn’t try frying that before the 20th century.” [more inside]
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Jan 9, 2014 - 90 comments

Allez Cuisine!

"Tell me what you eat, and I'll tell you what you are." -- Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 22, 2013 - 152 comments

Many recipes for candy

Make your own candy (canes). Konpeitō. Pop rocks. Rock candy. [more inside]
posted by aniola on Dec 13, 2013 - 28 comments

A few cups of good cheer

A Bar Above presents 25 freely available classic bartending books providing a wealth of drinks (and otherwise fascinating information) to liven up your holiday season. These are hosted on Google's Play service, so a Google account might be necessary to access. [more inside]
posted by codacorolla on Dec 10, 2013 - 9 comments

Native American Recipes

For your culinary enjoyment, I present NativeTech's collection of recipes, which you can browse by recipe category, regions, types of dishes, and alphabetically (the site is pretty vast, and you can find recipes throughout the site). For more manageable lists, here is a mixed collection of Native American Recipes, from Apache acorn soup to Zuni corn soup (there's more listed than soups, I promise). One Feather has shared some favorite recipes, and then there's the Native Food blog, with recipes and more information.
posted by filthy light thief on Nov 17, 2013 - 26 comments

Your face might melt before the popsicle.

Dean Martin used to make a joke in his stage shows: "I don't drink anymore. I freeze it and eat it like a Popsicle". But how exactly does that work? It's not exactly as simple as whipping up some Koolaid, poring it in a mold and sticking it in the freezer. And though summer is over and autumn is here, that's no reason not to indulge in a Tequila Lime Margarita Pop or a Havana Mojito Popsicle. And if you're feeling really daring, how about some Absinthe Pops?
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Oct 2, 2013 - 19 comments

The circuitous histories of hamburgers and ketchup

The history of the hamburger could be a relatively short story, or one spanning centuries and continents, depending on how far you disassemble the modern hamburger. If you look for the origins of ground meat between two pieces of bread, that's something American, but where and when exactly is the question. But how did we get the ground meat patty? You can thank the Mongols and Kublai Khan, who brought their ground meat to Russia. Oh, and don't forget the fish sauce! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 19, 2013 - 35 comments

Remember that the elephant is only for decoration – you cannot eat it.

Bad Jelly. Trying retro recipes so you don't have to. (Some images involving fruit may be NSFW. )
posted by louche mustachio on Aug 16, 2013 - 52 comments

Japanese recipes for the Anglophone

Cookpad is Japan's largest recipe site and cooking community. Yesterday, an English version was launched. [more inside]
posted by Tanizaki on Aug 6, 2013 - 52 comments

Let your feet be well boiled. Take half a pound of them chopped small...

The Cookbook of Unknown Ladies: Historian re-discovers a 300-year-old cookbook. [more inside]
posted by not_the_water on Jul 17, 2013 - 10 comments

*burp* what took so long?

"Ariane Kambu Mbenza grew up with her uncle in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When she was seven years old, he asked her to be in charge of preparing food. Sure, Uncle. No problem. She had grown up watching her mother cook and played kitchen plenty of times. "In Africa, you know how to cook automatically." Now a mother herself, Ariane showed me how to make what in Congo would be called, " Riz aux legumes avec poisson grillé avec la sauce tomate à l'ail." Text Via followed by Congolese mini Waffles as seen in the photo in the linked newspaper.
posted by infini on May 31, 2013 - 16 comments

Please Pass the Snotwinkles

Whelks: They're called snotwinkles on the East Coast, and they're "the next oyster" ?!
posted by peagood on Mar 19, 2013 - 82 comments

Are You Experienced?

For the past two Februarys, Serious Eats Chief Creative Officer J. Kenji Alt-Lopez has gone vegan for the entire month. Here he shares the 60 vegan recipes he created during his Vegan Experience.
posted by slogger on Mar 4, 2013 - 72 comments

I Am Not Afraid Of You And I Will Spice Your Soup

Yo La Tengo's 13th album, Fade, marks the first time in 15 years the band has made official music videos. 2 to be exact: the colorful & playfully psychedelic Before We Run, and the serene & educational I'll Be Around. Bon Appétit chats with Ira Kaplan about the use of recipes in the latter video.
posted by mannequito on Jan 30, 2013 - 12 comments

Add Some More Bourbon - One Day We'll All Be Dead

Saveur's utterly charming "Recipe Comix" features illustrated recipes/short stories by some of the web's best cartoonists covering a wide range of meals.
posted by The Whelk on Jan 21, 2013 - 14 comments

Archie's Recipes

Archie's Recipes - When my grandparents passed away my family rediscovered an old family recipe book that my great grandfather wrote by hand in an old ledger. [via mefi projects]
posted by item on Jan 5, 2013 - 17 comments

많이 드세요

Learn how to cook Korean food with Aeri Lee and Maangchi. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 18, 2012 - 26 comments

happiness, longevity, and good fortune

The citrus fruit called Buddha's hand or fingered citron, which "looks like a cross between a giant lemon and a squid, and can perfume a room for weeks with its mysterious fragrance," is currently in season in the northern hemisphere. Lacking pulp and juice, it does have long, pointed "fingers" full of curious non-bitter white pith. The skin is yellow and smells like flowers and bright lemon. [more inside]
posted by purpleclover on Dec 5, 2012 - 45 comments

"A clam for supper? a cold clam; is that what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?

"New Englanders learn quickly to dismiss the chowder where tomato ruins its gorgeous broth, where references to New York tarnish its name...However, few know how such distinctions came about in the first place, what processes were involved that resulted in one person's disgust of another's beloved creation, and why, to this day, do we stand by such convictions?" The New England Chowder Compendium, from the McIntosh Cookery Collection at the UMass Amherst library. [more inside]
posted by Miko on Dec 4, 2012 - 92 comments

Adventure Chef, c'mon tell your friends, we'll cook in very distant lands.

Rutabaga, a webcomic about an adventuring chef.
posted by curious nu on Nov 15, 2012 - 9 comments

New Taste Journal

The New Taste Journal is a collection of well over 600 healthy and delicious recipes that were created using a wide variety of simple yet amazing natural whole food ingredients.
posted by troll on Oct 30, 2012 - 11 comments

Want to Make Historic Recipes?

Want to make historic recipes? You can help transcribe the University of Iowa Libraries age old assortment of handwritten cookbooks, ca. 1600s-1960s, documenting culinary history in America and Europe and how tastes have changed over the years. Copy the text as is, including misspellings and abbreviations. [more inside]
posted by cashman on Oct 27, 2012 - 31 comments

Hash browns

How to cook perfect hash browns
posted by Egg Shen on Oct 18, 2012 - 92 comments

Christopher Kimball: "He may be the sole person associated with food journalism to remark, 'There’s something about pleasure I find annoying.'"

"Cooking isn't creative, and it isn't easy." A NYT Magazine piece on Christopher Kimball, Cook's Illustrated, and his franchise (America's Test Kitchen, Cook's Country, et al.). "At the core of C.I.’s M.O. are two intrepid observations Kimball has made about the innermost psychology of home cooks. Namely that they 1) are haunted by a fear of humiliation, and 2) will not follow a recipe to the letter, believing that slavishly following directions is an implicit admission that you cannot cook... What the magazine essentially offers its readers is a bargain: if they agree to follow the recipes as written, their cooking will succeed and they will be recognized by family and friends as competent or even expert in the kitchen... The bargain further holds that the peppercorn-crusted filet of beef or butterscotch-cream pie will turn out not only in C.I.’s professional kitchen, with its All-Clad pans and DCS ranges, but also on a lowly electric four-top, using a dull knife and a $20 nonstick skillet." [more inside]
posted by flex on Oct 14, 2012 - 196 comments

White House recipes, from ale to woodcock (roasted)

We know the Obamas planted a vegetable garden in 2009, bringing back the tradition of a White House Vegetable Garden (7:44 YT video), and Barack has home-brewed beer. The White House then released the recipes for their honey ale and honey porter, but what of the other White House recipes? Here are some modern Thanksgiving recipes, but what about the rest of the year? Our White House provides a glimpse into past White House kitchens, menus, and recipes, but that's still too thin. More than 50 White House recipes? Still not enough! OK, how about the complete White House Cookbook from 1887 (on Archive.org, also on Project Gutenberg and Google books). Vintage Recipes has kindly provided a tidied up table of contents and recipes for quicker browsing, but be warned, the techniques are dated, and some of the household tips are a bit questionable. More on presidential gastronomy, previously.
posted by filthy light thief on Sep 27, 2012 - 18 comments

Richard Olney

Like all shrines, this one is on a hill, and built into solid rock. Richard Olney saw it first in 1961 on an excursion south from his adoptive home in Paris. Olney, whose The French Menu Cookbook was recently judged the best cookbook ever by this magazine, immediately knew he had found his proper place on earth. [more inside]
posted by Egg Shen on Sep 24, 2012 - 12 comments

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them

Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (1918) by Goudiss and Goudiss
posted by aniola on Sep 13, 2012 - 37 comments

Just a bunch of Fluff

Archibald Query 's creation, Marshmallow Fluff, followed a winding path to household name. Most famous as a component of the Fluffernutter sandwich, this icon of New England cuisine appears in hundreds of other recipes, including whoopie pies and Mamie Eisenhower's Never Fail Fudge. You can even try making it yourself. . Other homages include the pop-style "Fluffart" of Susan Olsen, perhaps better known to us as the Brady Bunch's Cindy; some video tributes, and the What the Fluff? Festival in Somerville, MA (previously),
posted by Miko on Sep 9, 2012 - 36 comments

Seed a large prone turkey

How to Eat Like Your Favorite Authors
posted by superquail on Aug 15, 2012 - 45 comments

Happy Birthday, Julia

Tomorrow would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday. To celebrate, PBS Digital Studios offers: Julia Child Remixed. They also have created a celebration page, complete with an infographic, recipes, quotes, videos and more. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Aug 14, 2012 - 52 comments

"And what were they serving at El Bulli? Water!"

Drive 8.7 km (5.4 miles) west of the municipality of Roses in Catalonia, Spain, and you'll get to the gates of the renowned avant-garde restaurant, El Bulli. Run by Ferran Adrià since 1987, the restaurant closed in 2012 due to Adrià and his partner Juli Soler losing a half million Euros a year on the restaurant and Adrià's cooking workshop in Barcelona. Slate's Noreen Malone wrote an article on the history of the "I Ate at El Bulli" piece, giving an overview of tropes that you could expect in an IAaEB piece, and you can browse images tagged "elbulli" on Flickr for snapshots of personal experiences. But for an extended look into what went into making the ever-changing 35-course taster's menu, El Bulli: Cooking in Progress (Trailer on YT and Vimeo) is a 109 minute documentary on the preparation and implementation of the 2008/9 season, an "extreme fly-on-the-wall vérité, with only the barest context provided." If you're looking for recipes, Molecular Recipes has a few listed under the El Bulli tag. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 4, 2012 - 26 comments

Commuter Reading

What’s a Readlist? A group of web pages—articles, recipes, course materials, anything—bundled into an e-book you can send to your Kindle, iPad, or iPhone.
posted by netbros on May 23, 2012 - 43 comments

Bow before the power of my waffle iron!

Following on the heels of the easy way to caramelize onions, there are lots of other ways to reuse common kitchen gadgets including waffle iron hash browns and crock pot souffle, cooking fish in your dishwasher, using your rice cooker for oatmeal (among many other uses), and making a cornish hen on your panini press (and more from the master of gadget reuse). And to find out what gadgets are just plain useless, you can of course ask Alton Brown.
posted by blahblahblah on May 8, 2012 - 126 comments

Oniongate

Undoubtedly, at some point in your life, a recipe has told you to brown or caramelize some onions for 5-10 minutes. As many frustrated cooks have found through experience, this step of the recipe is a damned lie. In fact, the now-ubiquitous suggestion of 5-10 minutes isn't even a remote approximation of the amount of time it takes to brown an onion; Alton Brown and Julia Child weigh in on the matter, suggesting that the task can take anywhere from 45 minute to an hour. [more inside]
posted by schmod on May 7, 2012 - 202 comments

popcorn & hawaiian snack noms

Did you know popcorn may be the perfect healthy snack food? Probably not so much once you pile on the toppings! If you'd like to try a uniquely Hawaiian snack (are you adventurous enough for crack seed?) then popcorn meets Hawaii in hurricane popcorn: a mix of buttered popcorn, furikake, and arare ("mochi crunch" - a rice cracker mix). (This re-invented version includes corn pops, dried pineapple, and bacon).
posted by flex on May 4, 2012 - 61 comments

grilled cheesus!

Did you know April is Grilled Cheese Month? You still have time to celebrate! (via Tastespotting) [more inside]
posted by flex on Apr 28, 2012 - 48 comments

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