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Two attractive kids and their Lassie-like fish

If there was ever one man responsible for how an entire generation of American kids dreamed about science, animals, and nature it might be a producer by the name of Ivan Tors. [more inside]
posted by Toekneesan on Sep 14, 2013 - 7 comments

I killed my first D&D monster, and it was a Klan rally!

Mapping D&D combat mechanics to the world of 60s activism is remarkably effective and lots of fun.
posted by 23 on May 4, 2013 - 34 comments

Vietnam: An Antiwar Comic Book

A comic written by Julian Bond and published in 1967, after he was expelled from the Georgia House of Representatives for opposing the war in Viet Nam. [Warning: n-word is used once as an example of hate speech] [more inside]
posted by laconic skeuomorph on Jan 9, 2013 - 17 comments

Opening Night at La Scala

GlamourFilter: Opening Night at La Scala. Pictures from La Scala's opening nights, dating through the fifties and sixties. (Main story here, slideshow here, those links in Italian, but easy enough to figure out for non-speakers.) Pictures of Callas, Toscanini, Princess Grace, Dick and Liz, and many more, all looking impossibly fab and glamourous. (Via the always informative and entertaining Opera Chic.)
posted by Capt. Renault on Dec 13, 2012 - 10 comments

Dorks vs. Jets

David and the Dorks (aka Jerry and the Jets) played one rehearsal, 4 sets at the Matrix nightclub in San Francisco (Dec. 15, 16, 17 and 20, 1970), and one show at Pepperland in San Rafael on Dec. 21. Lineup: David Crosby, Jerry Garcia, Phil Lesh, and Mickey Hart (or was it Bill Kreutzmann? Or both?). Setlists. Shows. Analysis. Songs inside. [more inside]
posted by msalt on Jul 10, 2012 - 14 comments

Whicker's World. Party time! Excellent!

Whicker's World was a BBC documentary series that ran from 1959 to 1988, presented by Alan Whicker. In 1967, Whicker traveled to Haight-Ashbury in San Francisco to examine the phenomenon of hippies. Part One introduces us to The Love Generation. Part Two reveals that The Grateful Dead smoked marijuana. Part Three features freak-out dance performances and a hippy not on LSD. In Part Four, a woman in a hammock leads to teeny boppers violating the fuzz and the natural antagonism between the hippies and police. Part Five is on LSD. Part Six has many self-indulgent hippies. [more inside]
posted by twoleftfeet on Apr 21, 2012 - 25 comments

The Wrecking Crew

Bands often don't seem to be able to play on stage the way they did on their album; and we accept that for a lot of reasons having to do with the conditions, the production facilities and the sheer number of takes that were probably involved. But for a whole generation of hit music, there was often a more basic reason: it wasn't them playing on the album in the first place.
For nearly a decade, if you were an L.A. producer and you wanted to record a hit single, you'd call in The Wrecking Crew. Members of The Byrds, The Beach Boys, and The Mamas and the Papas would step aside as The Wrecking Crew laid down the instrumental tracks. Then, the members of the main band would come back to add the vocals on top.
The above link goes to the OPB radio story I listened to this morning, with an embedded player. Official site for the book.
posted by George_Spiggott on Apr 2, 2012 - 64 comments

Music, Movies, Microcode, and High-Speed Pizza Delivery

Le Blues De Memphis — behind the scenes at STAX & FAME Recording Studios (1969) and Hollywood Blues, a 1969 Hollywood Recording Session. Just a sample of the vintage 50s, 60s & 70s music, movies, microcode and high-speed pizza delivery at Bedazzled.tv. [sacré bleu]
posted by netbros on Jan 31, 2012 - 7 comments

Myra Hindley

My purpose here has been to inquire into mediated understandings of Hindley, and to question how popular texts delineate between the deeds of a human being and the way those deeds are culturally inscribed. The task is neither conclusive nor complete, for monsters are illusive. There is always some part of them that evades both enunciation and comprehension.
posted by Trurl on Oct 30, 2011 - 15 comments

Magazine 60

'60s medley from French elecro-synth band Magazine 60, probably most famous for their 1985 hit Don Quichotte.
posted by puny human on Nov 15, 2010 - 6 comments

Too skinny? Try Super Wate-On!

Gypsy Creams is dedicated to 1960's women's magazines - particularly the advertising - and is a fascinating insight into the issues of the day. Need to gain weight? Are you too hairy? Tired and depressed? Maybe you want to make your burnt finger worse. The answers are here, selected from the pages of magazines such as Woman's Own and Woman's Weekly. Gypsy Creams biscuits? Sorry, they're pretty rare these days.
posted by liquidindian on Mar 12, 2010 - 18 comments

Not entirely devoid of the con

Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr. Leonard Cohen For one week only on Pitchfork TV, "this 45-minute film from 1965 offers a candid glimpse of Cohen's pre-singer-songwriter days." Previously: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and let us never forget 7.
posted by FelliniBlank on Nov 21, 2009 - 28 comments

Your Guide To Living Out The Don Draper Dream

One of the best parts of watching Mad Men is the perfectly recreated world of 1960s New York. Who doesn’t wish they could simply step into their tvs for a moment and experience the romance of sipping a cocktail in an elegant 60s bar? Guest of a Guest put together a list of Mad Men inspired locales, consisting of places that have been around since the 1960s as well as their modern counterparts. Here’s everything you need to know to dress, drink, eat, and live like a character out of Mad Men.
posted by netbros on Oct 30, 2009 - 49 comments

Happy 40th

"Aberrant behavior had nothing to do with wearing love beads (59%), believing in Flower Power (64%), going to a "Be-In" (58%), or flashing the peace sign to complete strangers (81%) -- maybe only a sublime silliness..." -- Rex Weiner [more inside]
posted by Twang on Aug 14, 2009 - 24 comments

Lawrence Schiller: At the Heart of the Sixties

Lawrence Schiller: Photographer, author, producer, director captured the sixties and Marilyn Monroe. (Some Marilyn Monroe, NSFW)
posted by terranova on Feb 1, 2009 - 7 comments

1966 federal ban on racial discrimination in housing

The Meaning of Box 722. Letters to Senator Paul Douglas of Illinois in reaction to the 1966 civil rights bill, particularly the federal ban on racial discrimination in the sale and rental of housing. At the time, Chicago was the most segregated city in the north, with boundaries enforced by mob violence. By Rick Perlstein, author of Nixonland. When I started researching NIXONLAND I knew the congressional elections of 1966 would form a crucial part of the narrative. They'd never really been examined in-depth before, but by my reckoning they were the crucial hinge that formed the ideological alignment we live in now. Via Brad DeLong.
posted by russilwvong on Jun 5, 2008 - 15 comments

Drawing Rock Music

Legendary artist Alton Kelley created a graphic style that rocked the world beginning in the psychedelic sixties. His concert posters, logo designs, LP album covers, and fine art have forevermore defined that time. Kelley passed away peacefully at home on Sunday, June 1, 2008 of complications from a long illness.
posted by terrapin on Jun 2, 2008 - 18 comments

Pop Art in motion.

Clever! Peppy! Immensely entertaining! The opening sequence of the Dick Cavett Show was a little masterpiece of 60s pop graphics. A similar aesthetic is at work here in this 60s era PSA reminding you to vote. Here's some jazzy 60s animation: a commercial for Beechnut Gum. And lots more typically 60s animation and graphics on display here in this Animation Commercial Collection.
posted by flapjax at midnite on May 6, 2008 - 22 comments

One hit wonders of the 1960's.

One hit wonders of the 1960's: Talk Talk. Dirty Water. Psychotic Reaction. Bend Me Shape Me. Hot Smoke and Sassafras. 96 Tears. Wipe Out. My Green Tambourine. Ballad of the Green Beret. San Francisco. Fire. Israelites. You Keep Me Hanging On. Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye. Eve of Destruction. Incense and Peppermints. Liar Liar. Judy In Disguise. Journey to the Center of the Mind. Sukiyaki. Come On Down To My Boat. Double Shot of My Baby's Love.You'll Lose a Good Thing. The Hippy Hippy Shake. They're Coming To Take Me Away. Tiptoe Through the Tulips. In the Year 2525.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Nov 11, 2007 - 107 comments

I am not a number, I'm a mefi front page post

I am not a number, I am a free man. Forty years ago "The Prisoner" made it's American debut on CBS. A surreal and challenging science fiction series that follows "Number 6," a former government operative sent into a seemingly idyllic but twisted prison known as "The Village". Over the course of seventeen episodes, Number 6 struggles to retain his identity in the face of sophisticated and relentless attempts by the powers-that-be (led by people known only as "No. 2") to extract his secrets. It ended with a final episode that defies explanation and caused it's writer (the show's star Patrick McGoohan) to go into hiding after it aired. [more inside]
posted by inthe80s on Oct 1, 2007 - 79 comments

Swingin' Singapore, back in the day.

Okay, first, take a look at this collection of 60's and 70's Asian Pop Record Covers. Cause they're just a helluvalotta of fun to look at. Now, if you find your musical appetite whetted, the same fellow who brought you those wonderful jackets has a Singapore and Asian 60's Pop Music MySpace page, where you can listen to his fabulous audio playlist, see video clips and more record jackets, and get more info on this very fertile period in Asian pop music history. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 26, 2007 - 17 comments

retro style: fab fashions from the 60s and 70s

From hair styles and hotpants to bellbottoms and boots, this site has amassed a massive fashion photo collection of groovy celebrities and swingin' stars from the '60s and '70s.
posted by madamjujujive on Sep 9, 2007 - 26 comments

One man can change the world with a bullet in the right place

Before Caligula, Cat People & Star Trek: Generations, even before he played Alex de Large in Clockwork Orange, Malcolm McDowell was dashingly rebellious in Lindsay Anderson's If. (Some background of that cafe scene)
posted by growabrain on Jul 22, 2007 - 16 comments

To Boldly Go Where No Batman Has Gone Before

Star Trek vs. Batman Christopher Allen brings two icons of Sixties television together in a three-part, 51-minute epic adventure. Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 at Google Video. MPEG downloads and audio interviews at RASCO Motion Pictures site.
posted by LinusMines on Jul 10, 2007 - 19 comments

“Hello, can anyone hear me?”

The Cube (1969) , directed by Jim Henson. (Some background)
posted by growabrain on May 14, 2007 - 20 comments

I blame Brian Epstein.

Moptops in suits. Not necessarily the ones you were thinking of.
posted by oneirodynia on May 9, 2007 - 32 comments

... which is to say to my mind, there is continuous repetition and propotionally they are a bit boring.

On May 14th, 1967, the new British pop group The Pink Floyd makes one of their first ever TV appearances. Despite a stellar performance of the song Astronomy Domine, the pretentious host of the show, Hans Keller, has nothing good to say about the band. During the interview (youtube, performance comes first, interview starts about 5:50 in. transcript here.), he chastises the band for their "continuous repetition", "terribly loud" volume, and their "proportionately a bit boring" sound.

However, it seems that all Hans' show will ever be remembered for is this single interview. Pink Floyd, on the other hand.. Well, we all know what happened to them. Syd Barrett, on the other hand, was not so lucky.
posted by Afroblanco on May 29, 2006 - 67 comments

Mimmo Rotella's decollages

The World in Pieces. During the early 1960s, Mimmo Rotella (who just died in Milan at age 87) went around Europe collecting strips of advertising posters that had been pasted over and torn away many times. He also tore at posters (warning: big file) himself in a rebellious act of desecration to create the works he called decollages. More inside.
posted by matteo on Jan 14, 2006 - 4 comments

All hail the King of Fuh

All hail the King of Fuh Since 1965, Stephen "Brute Force" Friedland has been a professional blower of minds. He began his musical career penning the first existential/psychedelic girl group record, graduated to tapeworms and sat-upon sandwiches, then was personally signed by George Harrison as an Apple artist with the sly and ultimately unreleasable "King of Fuh." (Turn it inside out. There, you see. MP3.) But oddball songs of love and linguistic quirkiness are just the tip of Brutie's iceberg. In 1969, he swam half way across the Bering Strait in a symbolic plea to warm up the cold war. He does deliciously absurd stand-up prop comedy interspersed with song. And his eyebrows are a work of art in their own right. So all hail the Fuh King, who has never compromised his deliriously batty vision, and at this point assuredly never will.
posted by Scram on Nov 20, 2005 - 8 comments

patchouliPics

Flashback to the 60's and 70's.
posted by srboisvert on Mar 18, 2005 - 15 comments

Crumb

Interview of R Crumb, 60's legendary twisted cartoonist creator of Fritz the Cat and Snoid. This is no conservative man. Of Serena Williams he foams: "This butt is just bionic. It's beyond anything. It's unbelievable. Imagine having access to that?" He has a foot fetish, an obsession with piggybacking and delights in drawing outlandish pornographic cartoons. {more links at bottom of page} Related discussion/links here [All FPP links are SFW but some links from above sites are guaranteed NSFW]
posted by peacay on Mar 7, 2005 - 29 comments

TheSixtiesCdnStyle

CBC 60's archives and much much more
posted by srboisvert on Mar 7, 2005 - 4 comments

Prof Irwin Corey explains it all for you...

Professor Irwin Corey, the world's foremost expert on EVERYTHING, has quite a good website. Special highlight for lit geeks: the text of his acceptance speech on behalf of Thomas Pynchon when Gravity's Rainbow received a National Book Award citation, and an audio extract thereof.
posted by PinkStainlessTail on Nov 28, 2004 - 4 comments

This old town will never be the same.

Utica Club, Utica Club. This Friday, enjoy the strains of the Utica Club Natural Carbonation Beer Drinking Song.
posted by neckro23 on Aug 27, 2004 - 5 comments

Surfer Movie Posters of the Sixties

Surfer Movie Posters of the Sixties
posted by crunchland on May 31, 2003 - 8 comments

1960s civil rights news clippings

Civil rights, local style. Take a look at Mollie Huston Lee's great collection of as-it-happened coverage of the Feb 1960 lunch counter sit-ins in Raleigh, NC. Plenty of clippings about other heated local events, too. The details make the era come alive - boycott flyers, harumphing white editors, speculation that protests might "fizzle out, panty-raid style," armed Native Americans threatening to "wipe out" the local KKK, the program from the conference that birthed SNCC [pdf], early reactions to desegregation and much more. Gotta love those revealing little details.
posted by mediareport on Jan 21, 2003 - 4 comments

This would make a very nice birthday present

This would make a very nice birthday present - If anyone wants to buy me the Woodstock Master Tapes, I promise I will burn copies for you and all your friends...
posted by elvissinatra on Aug 1, 2002 - 13 comments

Dan Goodsell and Dallas Poague

Dan Goodsell and Dallas Poague bring my (and maybe your) childhood back to life with page after page filled with images of delightful (and sometimes creepy) memorabilia. Oh, the hours I spent commanding a Mission to Mars while sugared-up on Dinky Donuts and Rootin' Tootin' Raspberry FunnyFace.
posted by mr_crash_davis on Jul 24, 2002 - 7 comments

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