1725 posts tagged with Technology.
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"Those rules of thumb don’t apply to hard tech startups"

How to Build a Hard Tech Startup | CEO Jason Rosenthal deep-dives into the trials and tribulations surrounding the development of Lytro Cinema technology. [more inside]
posted by I_Love_Bananas on Jan 19, 2017 - 23 comments

Filling the amateur space archaeology niche

Paul Maley maintains three highly comprehensive pages dedicated to space debris which has fallen back to earth. These are organized into chronological sections: 1960-1980, 1981-2003, and 2004-present.
posted by Rumple on Jan 12, 2017 - 5 comments

Rescuing an Artwork from Crumbling Technologies (e.g. MS-DOS, Laserdisc)

What does it look like when a museum pulls a time-based media installation artwork from storage? MoMA Conservator Ben Fino-Radin tells the story of rescuing and exhibiting the 1994 interactive multimedia work Lovers, by Teiji Furuhashi. [more inside]
posted by desuetude on Jan 10, 2017 - 29 comments

Cormac McCarthy's Increasing Returns

How To Write Better Harvard Business Review Articles: Have Cormac McCarthy Do Your Editing - "I really enjoyed this anecdote about the writing of W. Brian Arthur's classic article on increasing returns from 1996." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jan 4, 2017 - 7 comments

We're Most Certainly Post-Something

The Morning News asks a collection of editors, journalists, writers, and activists: what were the Most and Least important stories of the year?
posted by The Whelk on Dec 31, 2016 - 11 comments

"You aren't offering anything back to the public."

How Pittsburgh became Uber's Kitty Hawk: Gov't emails reveal the promise, pitfalls of alliance — PennLive reports on the often chummy, sometimes adversarial relationship between Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and Uber senior executives, including co-founder and CEO Travis Kalanick. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Dec 29, 2016 - 31 comments

Through a Glass, Dark Enlightenment

The World's Largest Hedge Fund Is Building an Algorithmic Model of Its Founder's Brain - "Mr. Dalio has the highest stratum score at Bridgewater, and the firm has told employees he has one of the highest in the world. Likewise, Bridgewater's software judges Mr. Dalio the firm's most 'believable' employee in matters such as investing and leadership, which means his opinions carry more weight. Mr. Dalio is always in search of new data with which to measure his staff. He once raised the idea of using head bands to track people's brain waves, according to one former employee. The idea wasn't adopted." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Dec 28, 2016 - 80 comments

the spice must flow

The Strange Roots Of Globalization (And Its Discontents) - "Today's global economy has its roots in the frivolity of spice."
posted by kliuless on Dec 18, 2016 - 22 comments

It's all Sting's fault

Pizzas, Pot & Fields Of Gold: 7 Important Firsts In Online Retail History
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Dec 18, 2016 - 14 comments

Damn it, Jim, I'm a doctor not a...oh! Right!

Seeker.com: "Two Star Trek 'Tricorders' Have Made It to the Final Round of XPRIZE. This week, Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE officials announced that two teams of finalists have made it to the last round of the competition, having designed tricorder-style medical devices that are actually pretty space-age in look and function. Weighing in at less that five pounds each, the devices can diagnose and interpret 13 different health conditions within minutes, while continuously monitoring five different vital sign metrics." [more inside]
posted by Celsius1414 on Dec 15, 2016 - 27 comments

GM Mosquitoes: What Could Go Wrong?

Inside the insectary - "These gene drives, they're able to copy themselves. So instead of half of the offspring inheriting the gene drive, almost all of them do. So what happens is that it spreads and it spreads and it spreads. And this is the fantastic thing. Because it allows that gene to be selfish in a population. And in a very short amount of time you can actually transform an entire wild population into a modified population. It's powerful." (previously: 1,2,3)
posted by kliuless on Dec 14, 2016 - 37 comments

Made in China 2025

China has launched a high-tech revolution: Beijing has devised an industrial masterplan named "Made in China 2025" and is investing billions to turn China into one of the leading industrial countries by 2049. As the latest MERICS Paper on China shows, China's ambitious strategy is starting to bear fruit. Industrial countries like Germany and the United States have to be prepared for strong competition.
posted by infini on Dec 14, 2016 - 25 comments

Feature design versus trolling

“Harassers are very clever. They take advantage of tools that are very innocuous and use them as vectors for abuse,” Ehmke told me. “If you’re creating products and not thinking about how it could be used for abuse, you are not doing your job.” - How Github is dealing with its troll problem.
posted by Artw on Dec 5, 2016 - 50 comments

gtfo

Amazon has opened a corner store where customers can pick up their groceries and just walk out without having to queue up and pay at the checkout. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Dec 5, 2016 - 170 comments

28. Tuareg guitar players really like Dire Straits

Tom Whitwell of Fluxx lists 52 things I learned in 2016. [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Dec 3, 2016 - 18 comments

"Our most detailed view of Earth across space and time"

Google has released an update to their Google Earth Timelapse feature that provides for a longer time horizon and a much greater level of detail than has been previously available. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Nov 29, 2016 - 10 comments

Om

Silicon Valley Has an Empathy Vacuum
posted by infini on Nov 28, 2016 - 109 comments

The Next Step for Neuromorphic Chips

World’s First Photonic Neural Network Unveiled. Relevant paper here.
posted by StrikeTheViol on Nov 20, 2016 - 15 comments

The Age of Pain

In one respect, today’s emotional politics is the inverse of the 1960s. Back then, people were coming to define themselves by their pleasures: their sexual desires, consumer preferences, lifestyle choices. Today, many are coming to define themselves by their pains: past traumas, mental illnesses and chronic health conditions ... One culprit always stands out in public discussion of these trends: digital technology.
In The Age of Pain, New Statesman (15 November 2016), Will Davies (Goldsmith's, University of London) discusses the politics of pain and its intersection with digital technologies.
posted by Sonny Jim on Nov 17, 2016 - 32 comments

Fantasy. Or as capitalism prefers to call it “market research."

The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Issue a Press Release: Audrey Watters, a folklorist by training, examines the storytelling techniques of technology forecasting (especially ed-tech forecasting): If you repeat this fantasy, these predictions often enough, if you repeat it in front of powerful investors, university administrators, politicians, journalists, then the fantasy becomes factualized. (Not factual. Not true. But “truthy,” to borrow from Stephen Colbert’s notion of “truthiness.”) So you repeat the fantasy in order to direct and to control the future. Because this is key: the fantasy then becomes the basis for decision-making.
posted by Cash4Lead on Nov 8, 2016 - 6 comments

I just called to say...

Stealth Cell Tower is a project by Julian Oliver that blends art, technology, and awareness using a disguised office printer.
posted by exogenous on Nov 2, 2016 - 4 comments

a seasonal "science fair on steroids"

High Tech Pumpkins - Wired brings you a entries from the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's pumpkin carving contest. Aaron Yazzie has posted more NASA pumpkin pics at Twitter.
posted by madamjujujive on Oct 30, 2016 - 4 comments

I hope that the net stops fighting over stupid political stuff

"I didn't go online for a long time because of my fears it'd mostly be a bunch of 15-year old technoid geeks and social outcasts. ☯87DEC" Visit the early days of the Internet with @WWWTEXt which posts online conversations from 1980-94
posted by The Whelk on Oct 29, 2016 - 19 comments

Dating app fatigue sets in

“I think the whole selling point with dating apps is ‘Oh, it’s so easy to find someone,’ and now that I’ve tried it, I’ve realized that’s actually not the case at all"--The Rise of Dating App Fatigue
posted by MoonOrb on Oct 27, 2016 - 71 comments

"Unexpected item in bag"

Howard Schneider was a doctor treating psychiatric patients in the ER when he decided to transform the grocery store experience. He set out to invent the self checkout machine (partial transcript here). Schneider's self-checkout kiosk was first deployed at a Price Chopper supermarket in Clifton Park, New York in 1992. [more inside]
posted by mandolin conspiracy on Oct 22, 2016 - 86 comments

“You cannot really calculate the loss of consumer trust in money.”

A Bad Week for Samsung [The New York Times] “Samsung Electronics is killing its troubled Galaxy Note 7 [wiki] smartphone, a humbling about-face for the South Korean giant and its global brand. In an unprecedented move, the company will no longer produce or market the smartphones. The demise of the Galaxy Note 7 is a major setback for Samsung, the world’s largest maker of smartphones. The premium device — with a 5.7-inch screen, curved contours and comparatively high price — won praise from consumers and reviewers, and was the company’s most ambitious effort yet to take on Apple for the high-end market.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Oct 11, 2016 - 129 comments

Classifying Voice

Freedom of speech in the digital age - "Speech that disseminates ideas is more valuable than speech whose purpose is to intimidate others." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Oct 10, 2016 - 26 comments

"So we made it out of plywood"

The hardest part of writing a show in the '80s isn't getting music clearance or convincing actors to get those haircuts -- it's finding the right tech (or at least, making it look right). [more inside]
posted by Etrigan on Oct 4, 2016 - 69 comments

“Genius is the recovery of childhood at will.”

ARTS MacArthur Foundation Announces 2016 ‘Genius’ Grant Winners [The New York Times] This year’s winners of the MacArthur fellowships, awarded for exceptional “originality, insight and potential,” and publicly announced on Thursday, include writers, visual artists, scientists, nonprofit organization leaders and others, who are chosen at a moment when the recognition and money — a no-strings-attached grant of $625,000 distributed over five years — will make a difference. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 22, 2016 - 39 comments

New energy transitions: Tipping point for self-organized criticality?

Electric vehicles – It's not just about the car - "One of the key characteristics of complex systems, such as the world's energy and transport sectors, is that when they change it tends not to be a linear process. They flip from one state to another in a way strongly analogous to a phase change in material science... A second important characteristic of this type of economic phase change is that when one major sector flips, the results rip through the whole economy and can have impacts on the societal scale." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 9, 2016 - 58 comments

Dataism: Getting out of the 'job loop' and into the 'knowledge loop'

From deities to data - "For thousands of years humans believed that authority came from the gods. Then, during the modern era, humanism gradually shifted authority from deities to people... Now, a fresh shift is taking place. Just as divine authority was legitimised by religious mythologies, and human authority was legitimised by humanist ideologies, so high-tech gurus and Silicon Valley prophets are creating a new universal narrative that legitimises the authority of algorithms and Big Data." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 7, 2016 - 45 comments

Auditing Algorithms and Algorithmic Auditing

How big data increases inequality and threatens democracy - "A former academic mathematician and ex-hedge fund quant exposes flaws in how information is used to assess everything from creditworthiness to policing tactics, with results that cause damage both financially and to the fabric of society. Programmed biases and a lack of feedback are among the concerns behind the clever and apt title of Cathy O'Neil's book: Weapons of Math Destruction." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 6, 2016 - 61 comments

“I think we’ve reached peak iPhone,”

Will the New Apple iPhone Have a Headphone Jack? Rumormongers Say It Won’t [The New York Times] “When the latest iPhone is unveiled here on Wednesday in a 7,000-seat auditorium, it probably will instead be more like Christmas for a sneaky 10-year-old who long ago peeked at his present. Thanks. That’s it? Anyone who cares enough about the iPhone to know that a new model is being released this month already knows what it is supposed to be like: a little thinner, a little faster and equipped with superior cameras on the Plus model. By far the most controversial feature, however, is the one that will be missing: a headphone jack. A standard element of technology that can be traced back to 1878 and the invention of the manual telephone exchange, the jack is apparently going the way of the floppy disk and the folding map. The future will be wireless.” [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Sep 5, 2016 - 399 comments

Painting the Race to Space

Norman Rockwell, Walt Disney, Wernher von Braun, space habitats and moon landings - the improbable, bold history of space concept art.
posted by Artw on Sep 5, 2016 - 10 comments

Tor’s Branding Pivot is Going to Get Someone Killed

Recently The Tor Project changed their mission statement and social contract, including language about explicitly supporting human rights. Virgil Griffith argues that this is dangerous for exactly those users whose human rights are threatened: “the ‘Human Rights Watch for Nerds’ branding gives decidedly-unfriendly-and-opportunistic-authorities full license to do as they please with Tor operators or anyone who uses Tor.” [more inside]
posted by Rangi on Sep 4, 2016 - 19 comments

"They didn't want people to become too happy with receiving food relief"

"Whatever [the ingredients] taste like together is not particularly relevant." Terry Gross interviews married culinary historians Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe on the culinary history of the Great Depression and their new book 'A Square Meal' (37:00 audio, transcribed sections)
posted by The Whelk on Aug 27, 2016 - 50 comments

Colloquially known as the 'underboob selfie'

As Thailand is discovering, the smartphone — for all its indispensability as a tool of business and practicality — is also a bearer of values; it is not a culturally neutral device. And if digital imperialism is happening — if smartphones and other gadgets are bearing cultural freight as they cross borders — there is little doubt as to which nation’s values are hiding in the hold.
posted by Sebmojo on Aug 16, 2016 - 17 comments

The Moral Machine

The Moral Machine: Welcome to the moral machine! - you are a self-driving car, unfortunately something has gone horribly wrong - who put that wall there? Regrettably, you are now about to crash and must choose the lesser of two evils. Do you kill your passengers or that old lady and her cute little doggy crossing the road? - A new MIT project provides a public exploration of the kinds of trolley problem style dilemma's that self-driving cars may have to face and allows us to compare our shared moral intuitions.
posted by Another Fine Product From The Nonsense Factory on Aug 8, 2016 - 70 comments

Smart Dust Is Here

Engineers Create The First Dust-Sized Wireless Sensors That Can Be Implanted Into The Human Body. Relevant paper here.
posted by StrikeTheViol on Aug 6, 2016 - 70 comments

😢 [single-tear emoji]

Top 10 least-loved emojis [more inside]
posted by Johnny Wallflower on Aug 5, 2016 - 90 comments

Social divide stays in online learning

BBC: "There are strong social divisions in how young people use digital technology, according to international research from the OECD. The economics think tank found that in many countries wealthy and poor pupils spent similar amounts of time online. But richer youngsters were much more likely to use the internet for learning rather than games. The study argues that even with equal access to technology a "digital divide" persists in how the internet is used.""
posted by marienbad on Jul 26, 2016 - 25 comments

D.E.D.

In the first quarter of 2016 according to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, L.E.D.-lamp shipments in the U.S. were up three hundred and seventy-five per cent over last year, taking more than a quarter of the market for the first time in history. This would seem to be a good thing, but building bulbs to last turns out to pose a vexing problem: no one seems to have a sound business model for such a product.
posted by theodolite on Jul 14, 2016 - 88 comments

“We built voice modulation to mask gender in technical interviews.”

interviewing.io is a platform where people can practice technical interviewing anonymously and find jobs based on their interview performance. Women historically haven’t performed as well as men—specifically, men were getting advanced to the next round 1.4 times more often than women, and had a 20% higher average technical score from interviewers. In an attempt to erase this difference, interviewing.io added voice modulation to their online interviews.
posted by Rangi on Jul 11, 2016 - 15 comments

Autism, employment and tech

"Autism is seen like some sort of mental superpower where we can see math in the air. In my experience, this isn’t really the case." - Dispelling some myths about the autistic wunderkind programmer. Also: Why you might not want to get TOO excited about autism employment initiatives. Autism FAQ
posted by Artw on Jul 10, 2016 - 29 comments

All they need to know is this is the coolest thing they'll see all year

This robot stingray is powered by genetically engineered rat heart cells. It has an elastomer body and a stiff gold skeleton. Rat heart cells are grown in a specific pattern on the underside, and are activated by pulses of light -- allowing the robot to be remote controlled as it navigates through a liquid with suspended nutrients that keep the cells alive. More details from Science. Even Popular Mechanics doesn't need to do much sensationalizing to this story.
posted by cubby on Jul 7, 2016 - 12 comments

Track Changes

Matthew Kirschenbaum talks to The Atlantic about his book on the history of word processing, what early word processing looked like, early adopter Len Deighton, and how writers of all kinds adapted to the new technology.
posted by Artw on Jul 2, 2016 - 28 comments

Make sure you’re solving the right problem

"How does an apparently intelligent person end up suggesting a solution that might, at best, constitute unethical medical experiments on prisoners? How does a well-meaning person suggest a remedy that likely constitutes torture?" -- Are the questions Ethan Zuckerman asks, triggered by a particularly dumb article on using Soylent Green and Oculus Rift in prison reform, using it as a kick off point to discuss the wider problem of techno optimism and the inevitable reaction it brings.
posted by MartinWisse on Jun 25, 2016 - 104 comments

Trekonomics

The Economic Lessons of Star Trek's Money-Free Society - "[Manu Saadia] points to technologies like GPS and the internet as models for how we can set ourselves on the path to a Star Trek future. 'If we decide as a society to make more of these crucial things available to all as public goods, we're probably going to be well on our way to improving the condition of everybody on Earth', he says. But he also warns that technology alone won't create a post-scarcity future... 'This is something that has to be dealt with on a political level, and we have to face that.' " (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 21, 2016 - 102 comments

The Uncanny Mind That Built Ethereum

Vitalik Buterin invented the world's hottest new cryptocurrency and inspired a movement — before he'd turned 20 - "I think a large part of the consequence is necessarily going to be disempowering some of these centralized players to some extent because ultimately power is a zero sum game. And if you talk about empowering the little guy, as much as you want to couch it in flowery terminology that makes it sound fluffy and good, you are necessarily disempowering the big guy. And personally I say screw the big guy. They have enough money already." [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Jun 16, 2016 - 62 comments

The lasting legacy of the "rocket girls" of JPL

California-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been central to the US missile and rocket development and operations for decades, and from the beginning that technology's success rested on a corps of expert mathematicians, people known as computers. And from the beginning they were all women, in a time when such opportunities were few and far between. You can find pictures of them, but names have not been well-recorded ... until now. Nathalia Holt found many of those women and wrote about their experiences in her book, Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Jun 15, 2016 - 22 comments

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