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3 posts tagged with Tesseract. (View popular tags)
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The cosmos is also within us, we're made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos, to know itself.

Cosmos: A Personal Voyage is a thirteen-part television series of one hour shows written by Carl Sagan, Ann Druyan, and Steven Soter, that was aired at the tail end of 1980 and was - at the time - the most widely watched series in the history of American public television. It is best introduced by an audio excerpt of one of his books, The Pale Blue Dot. Inside is a complete annotated collection of the series. [more inside]
posted by Blasdelb on Nov 3, 2012 - 46 comments

Mrs Whatsit Sez: It's a Tesseract

A Hypercube is "One of the simplest four-dimensional structures that we can imagine...[Google cache]. It is the four-dimensional analogue of an ordinary cube."
It's confusing, but Drew's words and pictures here will probably wrap your head around the concept. If you're already a Math-Head, you may find this more interesting, and it leads us to this fun interactive tesseract. Or you can draw your own.
Want even more fun?: This Hypercube is just out on video (in the US; 3/03 in the UK), this tesseract has been around since '62, and this one is has just been released.
[Yes, tesseracts & h-cubes were previously discussed here & even waaay back here.]
posted by Shane on May 8, 2003 - 23 comments

The Tesseract

The Tesseract Charles H. Hinton, eccentric, bigamist, son-in-law of George Boole (yes that Boole) coined the word Tesseract and claimed that we could all visualize the fourth dimension. He wrote several books and claimed to have created a set of cubes that, used properly, would allow anyone to visualize hyperspace. His ideas were all the rage. Salvador Dali was inspired by him. Robert Heinlein wrote a classic short story about a house built as an unfolded tesseract. Madeleine L'Engle wrote a classic children's story. With the advent of Einstein and his claim that "Time was the fourth dimension", the higher spatial dimensions were forgotten. (Until recently that is) And Hinton was forgotten. Or was he? And what happened to the cubes? Rudy Rucker, a huge fan of Hinton,fails to reprint the instructions. Rumours are that, if you build them and use them, they will drive you insane.
posted by vacapinta on Jul 9, 2002 - 22 comments

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