224 posts tagged with Transportation.
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Clean cracks help improve the smoothness of everyone’s experience.

Bewildered residents wonder why toilet paper is being spread all over town. Toilet paper is used to keep newly-applied tar in smaller cracks and off our shoes, bikes, and cars. Single-ply only.
posted by asperity on Nov 4, 2016 - 20 comments

New energy transitions: Tipping point for self-organized criticality?

Electric vehicles – It's not just about the car - "One of the key characteristics of complex systems, such as the world's energy and transport sectors, is that when they change it tends not to be a linear process. They flip from one state to another in a way strongly analogous to a phase change in material science... A second important characteristic of this type of economic phase change is that when one major sector flips, the results rip through the whole economy and can have impacts on the societal scale." (via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Sep 9, 2016 - 58 comments

"The annihilation of space and time"

“When I closed my eyes this sensation of flying was quite delightful, and strange beyond description.” British actress Fanny Kemble provides a spirited account of the first passenger railroad trip in 1830.
posted by AlonzoMosleyFBI on Aug 27, 2016 - 14 comments

‘Suck It Up’

"With neighborhoods in Brooklyn along the L line — among the city’s busiest subway routes — in anguish over losing their train to Manhattan for 18 months, New Yorkers living in so-called subway deserts have a message: Welcome to the club." [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 15, 2016 - 69 comments

How do we increase accessibility?

What Works: The Train That Saved Denver - "How Denver overcame regional factionalism to build a rail system that is a model for 21st century growth... it all happened, Hickenlooper and others note, because Coloradans across the base of the Front Range were willing to set aside crippling rivalries and make some big collective investments in themselves." (viz. Spain, cf. California & Florida; via) [more inside]
posted by kliuless on Aug 8, 2016 - 17 comments

The Weed Route

In the winter of 1980 The Chicago Milwaukee St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (Milwaukee Road) abandoned almost 2000 miles of track between Miles City, Montana and Cedar Falls, Washington -- part of a passenger and freight shipping route known as the “Pacific Coast Extension.” Today, what's left of the Extension is "cut up among different railroads and the best engineered rail line through the rugged Rockies and Cascades is but weeds and trails, a vital transportation artery no longer available to shippers and the American economy." But in August 1980, before it was abandoned, two former locomotive firemen and engineers spent $400 to rescue a track-maintenance railway car, a 1952 M-19 Fairmont Speeder, from a scrap heap in a Maine train yard. They used it to travel the route and took photos along the way. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jul 27, 2016 - 20 comments

"How do you get to Carnegie Hall?" "Ride your bike there!"

NYC Streets Metamorphosis looks back at the transformation of Times Square, Herald Square, the Brooklyn waterfront and other locations around NYC that are shifting away from their automobile-centric past. From Streetfilms, a part of the Streetsblog network.
posted by Room 641-A on Jun 22, 2016 - 2 comments

Pathetic Motorways

If people ever do think of a motorway, they think of miles upon miles of tarmac, of great long roads that go from one end of the country to another. This isn't always the case, which is where Pathetic Motorways comes in. Here we look at the shorter, more unusual motorways in a tongue-in-cheek manner; and also examine motorway history - in other words what is, what was, and what might have been all based around those blue lines on maps.
posted by MoonOrb on May 12, 2016 - 12 comments

It's difficult to convey complex civic problems in 140 characters

SF BART's twitter account admits that their infrastructure is failing and delves into the details: "We have 3 hours a night to do maintenance on a system built to serve 100k per week that now serves 430k per day." [more inside]
posted by sibilatorix on Mar 21, 2016 - 81 comments

If we lowered transit construction costs, we could build more transit

US transit projects are way more expensive than those in similar countries. Addressing the reasons why could help us build more transit.
posted by jason's_planet on Jan 28, 2016 - 79 comments

In praise of slow cycling

We had the opportunity to cycle in a number of North American cities in 2015, including Washington D.C., Montreal, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles. And it was through the mixed experiences of sharing their streets with locals that we began to observe a seldom-discussed measure of a city’s bike-friendliness: the speed at which its cyclists travel.
posted by aniola on Jan 26, 2016 - 41 comments

A township could not be exactly six miles on each side

Grid corrections : places where North American roads deviate from their otherwise logical grid lines in order to account for the curvature of the Earth. You could drive out there your whole life, de Ruijter realized, and not realize that certain stop signs and intersections exist not because of eccentric real estate deals, but because they are mathematical devices used to help planners wrap a rectilinear planning scheme onto the surface of a spherical planet.
posted by desjardins on Dec 10, 2015 - 41 comments

All Roads Lead to Rome(s)

Every cell of this grid contains the starting point to one of our journeys to Rome. Now that we have our 486,713 starting points we need to find out how we could reach Rome as our destination. For this we created a algorithm that calculates one route for every trip. The more often a single street segment is used, the stronger it is drawn on the map. The maps as outcome of this project is somewhere between information visualization and data art, unveiling mobility and a very large scale.
Some beautiful and interesting visualizations of transportation models for Europe and the world, including all the towns called "Rome" in the United States. Also: Urban Mobility Fingerprints and Create Your Own (Europe Only).
posted by Rumple on Dec 10, 2015 - 10 comments

Subpolar Express

The Canadian Pacific Christmas Train is a rolling holiday party for a cause. Two beautifully lit trains - on a US Route and a Canada route - cruise through the Midwest, stopping in 150 towns along the way to present live music and light shows while bringing donations of cash and food to local food banks.
posted by Miko on Dec 6, 2015 - 26 comments

Transportation data -- NYC

Analyzing 1.1 Billion NYC Taxi and Uber Trips, with a Vengeance Related: Taxi app test-drive: Uber, Lyft, Gett, Arro vs. hailing a yellow cab by hand
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 19, 2015 - 3 comments

NYC Subway Signals and Countdown Clocks

Why New York Subway Lines Are Missing Countdown Clocks. Here is an engaging yet fairly thorough and technical explanation of the signal system(s) used in the NYC Subway (SLAtlantic) [more inside]
posted by millipede on Nov 13, 2015 - 61 comments

vision zero IRL

9 Cities Around the World That Are Going Carfree
posted by aniola on Oct 25, 2015 - 58 comments

Variations on a Traffic Jam

Here's fifty lanes of automobile traffic in Beijing. Here's a bike traffic jam at CicLAvia in Los Angeles, and on New York's 5th Avenue the traffic is afoot.
posted by aniola on Oct 12, 2015 - 22 comments

Passengers 'rush to be in my bus'

Vankadarath Saritha, Delhi's first female bus driver - "Women have been to space so why can't we drive a bus?"
posted by kliuless on Oct 6, 2015 - 9 comments

"...unfamiliarity does not equate to impracticality."

The Case for More Traffic Roundabouts — "Here’s why: Using simple principles of physics, roundabouts dramatically reduce crash rates, as well as injuries and deaths. They diminish vehicle emissions. They are a more effective use of road space, and cost less to maintain than traditional four-way intersections. And it’s time that America learns to love them."
posted by tonycpsu on Sep 18, 2015 - 141 comments

Ube Goldberg

New Uber Service Sounds Suspiciously Like a Bus — New Uber "Smart Routes" feature offers passengers fare discounts in exchange for pick-ups along predetermined high-ridership routes. Rather than trying to compete with public transit, FiveThirtyEight points out that Uber and public transit can complement each other. Meanwhile, the yellow cab industry is trying to fight back against Uber with an Uber-like smartphone app for NYC passengers.
posted by tonycpsu on Aug 28, 2015 - 61 comments

Mapping the beautiful chaos of informal transit

As transit systems go, the matatus in Nairobi exist somewhere between underground gypsy cabs and MTA bus service. The minibuses themselves aren't owned by any government agency. The fares aren't regulated by the city. The routes are vaguely based on a bus network that existed in Nairobi some 30 years ago, but they've since shifted and multiplied and expanded at the region's edges... Riders who navigate the matatu system rely on it in parts, using only the lines they know and the unofficial stops they're sure actually exist. As for the network as a whole – there's never even been a map of it... In the absence of a formal public transit system in Kenya's capital, people have created a comprehensive – if imperfect – one on their own. And now we know that it looks like this. [more inside]
posted by ChuraChura on Aug 27, 2015 - 21 comments

Weekly Transportation Webcasts

Transportation Studies Weekly Seminar hosted by U.C. Davis.
posted by aniola on Jun 11, 2015 - 4 comments

"'Excuse me,'" I said, using my bony ass to crush his thigh."

I Have Been Sitting on Manspreaders For the Last Month and I Have Never Felt More Free (Previously)
posted by Jacqueline on Jun 4, 2015 - 436 comments

I’m never seeing my Astoria friends again!

But as the city transformed into an exceedingly safe and exceedingly expensive place to live over the past two decades, it’s not only the crime and the pervasive decay that have fallen away, but the close proximity, creating a social commute that echoes and exacerbates a work commute that, at more than six hours a week, is the longest in the nation. People have always traveled to see their friends, of course, but rarely has it been so frequent or far to qualify as a commute
The Social Commute: How the Big Schlep Is Changing the Way New Yorkers Live
posted by griphus on May 21, 2015 - 148 comments

“When you consider investment priorities, safety comes last,” she said.

Technology to reduce speeding trains absent from many train lines, including the section of the most recent derailment. Just one day after the Philadelphia train derailment, the House votes against increased Amtrak funding [more inside]
posted by sio42 on May 14, 2015 - 29 comments

“This is a real-estate deal but not a real-estate deal,”

New Balance Bought Its Own Commuter Rail Station [The Atlantic]
If you were in a generous mood, you might call the public transportation system here troubled. Otherwise, you’d call it an ancient, broke, disorganized, mess. The MBTA owes $9 billion in debt. Trains are old. They often can’t run in the snow, which is problematic in a city that got 109 inches last winter. Still, the city of Boston is growing as Millennials and Boomers alike look for walkable, dense places to live. Boston needs more transit, but the state can’t help much: Governor Charlie Baker has proposed cutting $26 million from the state Department of Transportation and $14 million of MBTA funding. So when athletic company New Balance decided to expand its headquarters and build retail, a hotel, a track, and skating rink in one Boston neighborhood not served by public transit, it didn’t wait for the city to agree to build new train stations or add bus routes, which could have taken years. Instead, it decided to build a commuter rail station itself.
posted by Fizz on May 12, 2015 - 75 comments

“Is this for a class?”

A Guinness World Record Diary: Dr. Strangeline, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying About the Amateur New York Subway Riding Committee and Love the MTA
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 31, 2015 - 8 comments

The Last LA Freeway

Although competing theories about urban planning were part of the long battle, it was about more than just the best way to move people through a sprawling megalopolis. The freeway became a focal point for resistance to paternalistic urban renewal, but then, ultimately, an example of socially responsible civil engineering. When the rubber finally hit the road on the 105, Judge Pregerson’s ruling ensured that central planners could no longer impose public-works projects on communities without residents having their say.
posted by ellieBOA on Mar 27, 2015 - 10 comments

Beyond Traffic.

The USDOT has released a 322-page comprehensive draft report on infrastructure and transportation trends in the next 30 years. {322 pp PDF}
posted by pjern on Feb 8, 2015 - 45 comments

Humans Need Not Apply

Full of assumptions, still thought-provoking article about self-driving cars by writer Zach Kanter, How Uber’s Autonomous Cars Will Destroy 10 Million Jobs and Reshape the Economy by 2025. [more inside]
posted by growabrain on Feb 1, 2015 - 193 comments

Heart and sole

Detroit man walks 21 miles in daily work commute
posted by T.D. Strange on Feb 1, 2015 - 131 comments

Cars: How do they work?

You wonder how your car works, you say? Let the wisdom of the ancients guide you. Start with springs and shock absorbers (1938). [more inside]
posted by Harald74 on Dec 31, 2014 - 41 comments

Seattle’s unbelievable transportation megaproject fustercluck

Seattle's unbelievable transportation megaproject fustercluck — "In short: There is no plan to resolve the dispute over cost overruns, which are ubiquitous on projects like this; at $4.2 billion, it's the most expensive transportation project in state history. The tunnel will have no exits - no ingress or egress - throughout the entire downtown core (which makes the support of downtown businesses all the more mystifying). It won't allow transit, only cars. It will be tolled, highly enough, by the state's own estimates, to drive nearly half its traffic onto the aforementioned side streets. It will be a precarious engineering feat, the widest deep-bore tunnel in history, digging right between a) Puget Sound and b) the oldest part of Seattle, with vulnerable buildings and God-knows-what buried infrastructure. Also: Pollution. Climate change. It's the 21st f'ing century. On and on. People said all this and more, in real time, to no avail." [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Dec 16, 2014 - 166 comments

sucking the wheel

The excellent Copenhagenize blog presents a short glossary of idioms, in Danish and a few other languages, that are semantically derived from cycling terminology.
posted by threeants on Dec 12, 2014 - 11 comments

The Beast of Turin

100 years ago bigger was better in search for speed and this is the biggest of them all. The beast of Turin [more inside]
posted by alfanut on Dec 3, 2014 - 26 comments

ATCSCC ADVZY 020 DCC/ZAU 09/26/2014 ZAU GROUND STOP

On Friday, ATCSCC Advisory 20 of 26-Sep-2014 went out. When operators, controllers and airport managers saw the title, a gasp of disbelief was heard. The problem was simple enough to state in three words, and complex enough to cancel thousand of flights and cost hundred of millions of dollars: ZAU ATC ZERO. [more inside]
posted by eriko on Sep 29, 2014 - 106 comments

Hey, Taxi!

NYC Taxis: A Day in the Life - A Data Visualization displays the data for one random NYC yellow taxi on a single day in 2013. See where it operated, how much money it made, and how busy it was over 24 hours. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jul 14, 2014 - 30 comments

Metro System Ambiance

Algiers Athens Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Chicago Copenhagen Delhi Dubai Glasgow Guangzhou Istanbul Lima London Kolkata Kuala Lumpur Madrid Manila Mecca Mexico City Milan Montreal Moscow Munich New York Oslo Paris Philadelphia Prague Pyongyang Recife Rome Saint Petersburg Santiago Seoul Shanghai Shenzhen Singapore Sofia Sydney Stockholm Taipei Tehran Tokyo Vienna
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jul 13, 2014 - 47 comments

Hell on Wheels

Hell on Wheels: Are bad trucking laws partially to blame for Tracy Morgan's accident?
Two days before Kevin Roper crashed his Walmart big rig into Tracy Morgan’s limousine, critically injuring the comedian and killing his colleague James McNair, the Senate Appropriations Committee quietly loosened the laws governing truckers’ hours on the road. Senator Susan Collins slipped an amendment into an appropriations bill suspending for one year a rule limiting truckers to 70-hour work weeks, with a mandatory 34-hour “re-start” once they hit that threshold. Under the amendment, the law would revert to an 82-hour workweek. The Truck Safety Coalition denounced the measure: “What is being portrayed as a small change to the rest period actually has a large impact on crash risk and will set back safety for everyone sharing the roads with large 80,000-pound trucks.”
posted by tonycpsu on Jun 16, 2014 - 80 comments

Plotting the Future of Pallets

For more than half a century, pallet futurists have announced the next big thing, only to see the basic wooden variety remain the workhorse of global logistics. Pallets, previously.
posted by shoesfullofdust on May 26, 2014 - 34 comments

"transit-oriented development" and "magical" in the same sentence

Can Atlanta Go All In on the BeltLine?
That magical TOD experience came courtesy of the BeltLine: Atlanta's multibillion-dollar, 25-year project to transform 22 miles of railroad and industrial sites into a sustainable network connecting 45 inner-city communities. The project envisions wide walking and biking paths, access to nearby neighborhoods and businesses, parks and green space, and new homes, shops, and apartments.
posted by davidstandaford on May 8, 2014 - 25 comments

Everyone tries to do a pull up, everyone.

Video proof that being all alone in a subway car causes madness in passengers
posted by The Whelk on Apr 28, 2014 - 54 comments

Planning Love

V-Day cards for planners, architects, urban designers, landscape architects, transportation engineers, and those who love them.
posted by parudox on Feb 14, 2014 - 15 comments

Courtesy of the University of Oklahoma Institute for Quality Communities

The U.S. Cities Where the Fewest Commuters Get to Work By Car
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Nov 28, 2013 - 41 comments

BART strike continues

BART workers are continuing their strike into Monday, with no quick end to the strike in sight. [more inside]
posted by Noisy Pink Bubbles on Oct 20, 2013 - 84 comments

United States of America

Warning! The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased, entry for the United States of America
posted by Blasdelb on Sep 29, 2013 - 49 comments

What's worth preserving out there anyway?

Inspired by the NYT Pulitzer prize-winning “Snowfall” report, the Charlottesville VA paper the C-ville Weekly decided to "take our last best shot at untangling the Gordian Knot that is the Bypass problem" in one long, media-rich article.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 6, 2013 - 43 comments

The Long Trip to Treasure Island

Unlike its original namesake or famous sibling, the new Eastern span of the San Francisco/Oakland Bay Bridge opens with little fanfare on Labor Day. Even governor Jerry Brown, once mayor of Oakland and the political force [1998] behind its groundbreaking signature design, is skipping the party.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on Aug 29, 2013 - 44 comments

Hyperloop

HYPERLOOP Elon Musk & SpaceX finally reveal their plan for a radical new mass transportation system, Hyperloop.
posted by GuyZero on Aug 12, 2013 - 300 comments

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