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191 posts tagged with Transportation.
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Seattle’s unbelievable transportation megaproject fustercluck

Seattle's unbelievable transportation megaproject fustercluck — "In short: There is no plan to resolve the dispute over cost overruns, which are ubiquitous on projects like this; at $4.2 billion, it's the most expensive transportation project in state history. The tunnel will have no exits - no ingress or egress - throughout the entire downtown core (which makes the support of downtown businesses all the more mystifying). It won't allow transit, only cars. It will be tolled, highly enough, by the state's own estimates, to drive nearly half its traffic onto the aforementioned side streets. It will be a precarious engineering feat, the widest deep-bore tunnel in history, digging right between a) Puget Sound and b) the oldest part of Seattle, with vulnerable buildings and God-knows-what buried infrastructure. Also: Pollution. Climate change. It's the 21st f'ing century. On and on. People said all this and more, in real time, to no avail." [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Dec 16, 2014 - 152 comments

sucking the wheel

The excellent Copenhagenize blog presents a short glossary of idioms, in Danish and a few other languages, that are semantically derived from cycling terminology.
posted by threeants on Dec 12, 2014 - 11 comments

The Beast of Turin

100 years ago bigger was better in search for speed and this is the biggest of them all. The beast of Turin [more inside]
posted by alfanut on Dec 3, 2014 - 26 comments

ATCSCC ADVZY 020 DCC/ZAU 09/26/2014 ZAU GROUND STOP

On Friday, ATCSCC Advisory 20 of 26-Sep-2014 went out. When operators, controllers and airport managers saw the title, a gasp of disbelief was heard. The problem was simple enough to state in three words, and complex enough to cancel thousand of flights and cost hundred of millions of dollars: ZAU ATC ZERO. [more inside]
posted by eriko on Sep 29, 2014 - 106 comments

Hey, Taxi!

NYC Taxis: A Day in the Life - A Data Visualization displays the data for one random NYC yellow taxi on a single day in 2013. See where it operated, how much money it made, and how busy it was over 24 hours. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jul 14, 2014 - 30 comments

Metro System Ambiance

Algiers Athens Bangkok Barcelona Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Caracas Chicago Copenhagen Delhi Dubai Glasgow Guangzhou Istanbul Lima London Kolkata Kuala Lumpur Madrid Manila Mecca Mexico City Milan Montreal Moscow Munich New York Oslo Paris Philadelphia Prague Pyongyang Recife Rome Saint Petersburg Santiago Seoul Shanghai Shenzhen Singapore Sofia Sydney Stockholm Taipei Tehran Tokyo Vienna
posted by Foci for Analysis on Jul 13, 2014 - 47 comments

Hell on Wheels

Hell on Wheels: Are bad trucking laws partially to blame for Tracy Morgan's accident?
Two days before Kevin Roper crashed his Walmart big rig into Tracy Morgan’s limousine, critically injuring the comedian and killing his colleague James McNair, the Senate Appropriations Committee quietly loosened the laws governing truckers’ hours on the road. Senator Susan Collins slipped an amendment into an appropriations bill suspending for one year a rule limiting truckers to 70-hour work weeks, with a mandatory 34-hour “re-start” once they hit that threshold. Under the amendment, the law would revert to an 82-hour workweek. The Truck Safety Coalition denounced the measure: “What is being portrayed as a small change to the rest period actually has a large impact on crash risk and will set back safety for everyone sharing the roads with large 80,000-pound trucks.”

posted by tonycpsu on Jun 16, 2014 - 80 comments

Plotting the Future of Pallets

For more than half a century, pallet futurists have announced the next big thing, only to see the basic wooden variety remain the workhorse of global logistics. Pallets, previously.
posted by shoesfullofdust on May 26, 2014 - 34 comments

"transit-oriented development" and "magical" in the same sentence

Can Atlanta Go All In on the BeltLine?
That magical TOD experience came courtesy of the BeltLine: Atlanta's multibillion-dollar, 25-year project to transform 22 miles of railroad and industrial sites into a sustainable network connecting 45 inner-city communities. The project envisions wide walking and biking paths, access to nearby neighborhoods and businesses, parks and green space, and new homes, shops, and apartments.
posted by davidstandaford on May 8, 2014 - 25 comments

Everyone tries to do a pull up, everyone.

Video proof that being all alone in a subway car causes madness in passengers
posted by The Whelk on Apr 28, 2014 - 54 comments

Planning Love

V-Day cards for planners, architects, urban designers, landscape architects, transportation engineers, and those who love them.
posted by parudox on Feb 14, 2014 - 15 comments

Courtesy of the University of Oklahoma Institute for Quality Communities

The U.S. Cities Where the Fewest Commuters Get to Work By Car
posted by Blazecock Pileon on Nov 28, 2013 - 41 comments

BART strike continues

BART workers are continuing their strike into Monday, with no quick end to the strike in sight. [more inside]
posted by Noisy Pink Bubbles on Oct 20, 2013 - 84 comments

United States of America

Warning! The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased, entry for the United States of America
posted by Blasdelb on Sep 29, 2013 - 49 comments

What's worth preserving out there anyway?

Inspired by the NYT Pulitzer prize-winning “Snowfall” report, the Charlottesville VA paper the C-ville Weekly decided to "take our last best shot at untangling the Gordian Knot that is the Bypass problem" in one long, media-rich article.
posted by Potomac Avenue on Sep 6, 2013 - 43 comments

The Long Trip to Treasure Island

Unlike its original namesake or famous sibling, the new Eastern span of the San Francisco/Oakland Bay Bridge opens with little fanfare on Labor Day. Even governor Jerry Brown, once mayor of Oakland and the political force [1998] behind its groundbreaking signature design, is skipping the party.
posted by Chinese Jet Pilot on Aug 29, 2013 - 44 comments

Hyperloop

HYPERLOOP Elon Musk & SpaceX finally reveal their plan for a radical new mass transportation system, Hyperloop.
posted by GuyZero on Aug 12, 2013 - 300 comments

Suggestions for Improving the NYC Subway System

NY Magazine picks the 22 Ingenious Ways to Improve the Subway from this tumblr list (some more practical than others).
posted by beisny on Aug 1, 2013 - 104 comments

P only equals NP if that bridge doesn't go out

Unhappy Truckers and Other Algorithmic Problems - What happens when the traveling salesman problem meets the real world at UPS and Yellow Freight.
posted by Chrysostom on Jul 24, 2013 - 54 comments

There's nothing negative I can say about the transit system.

Darius McCollum was recently arrested in New York for stealing a Trailways bus. Evidently he drove the bus to a Manhattan hotel where he picked up a flight crew and drove them to JFK Airport. On the way back to a New Jersey bus depot, he was pulled over by the cops. This wasn't the first time Mr. McCollum was arrested while (unlawfully) transporting the public. In fact, it was the 29th time. [more inside]
posted by mark7570 on Jul 17, 2013 - 58 comments

The many ways of showing how we get from A to B

Transit Maps. Designer Cameron Booth's blog and review of transit maps, diagrams, design and artwork from all over the world. [more inside]
posted by andrewesque on May 13, 2013 - 8 comments

Time Square Still Hell On Earth

So, which are the most used subway stops/lines in New York City anyway?
posted by The Whelk on Apr 11, 2013 - 32 comments

Pluck

Prior to their southward migration, the godwits eat up large, until up to 55 per cent of their body weight is fat. They then reduce the size of their gut, kidney and liver by up to 25 per cent to compensate for the added weight. Godwits are amazing migratory shorebirds who travel many thousands of miles at a go. Here's a brief documentary of people studying them (12 minutes on youtube + ad, shows invasive surgery). Here's some science on their flights (creative commons). [more inside]
posted by aniola on Apr 1, 2013 - 6 comments

Suburbia was our manufactured manifest destiny

The Top Ten Influences on the American Metropolis of the Past 50 Years [more inside]
posted by spamandkimchi on Mar 13, 2013 - 126 comments

Whenever there's trouble, they're there on the double.

"On a good day, the street maintenance team tasked by the New York City Department of Transportation with roadway repair might fill 4,000 potholes in eight hours. In an average week, they could resurface 100,000 square yards of road. After Hurricane Sandy, their crews removed 2,500 tons of debris. And every day, on a Tumblr called The Daily Pothole, New Yorkers can take a peek inside the workings of a city system few have likely thought about." Storyboard: A Day with New York City’s Pothole Repair Crew. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jan 2, 2013 - 8 comments

Pick your plot, worry about the details later.

As Americans, we pick a place to live and then figure out how to get where we need to go. If no way exists, we build it. Roads, arterials, highways, Interstates, and so on. Flexible and distributed transportation networks are really the only solution compatible with that way of thinking. Trains, which rely on a strong central network, never had a chance. We were destined for the automobile all the way back in 1787, when we first decided to carve up the countryside into tidy squares.
Town, Section, Range, and the Transportation Psychology of a Nation [more inside]
posted by davidjmcgee on Nov 30, 2012 - 20 comments

You would download your car data

"You probably don't think of your car as a developer platform, but Mike Rosack did."
posted by vidur on Nov 26, 2012 - 25 comments

Copenhagen cool

American public transportation commercials? Boring. Belgian De Lijn commercials? Amusing. Danish? Exciting!
posted by fredludd on Sep 13, 2012 - 17 comments

"My kids have forgotten what it's like to even be in a car."

Six kids, one bike, one tough mother. [more inside]
posted by gottabefunky on Sep 8, 2012 - 93 comments

Finally, an alternative to Big Pedal.

Presenting the FLIZ velocipede, for anyone who's wondering what you get when you cross a German hipster and a wheeled banana.
posted by jimmythefish on Aug 28, 2012 - 40 comments

Infrastructure Costs

Tunneling in any dense urban environment is an expensive proposition, but the $5 billion price tag for just the first two miles of the Second Avenue subway cannot be explained by engineering difficulties. The segment runs mainly beneath a single broad avenue, unimpeded by rivers, super-tall skyscraper foundations or other subway lines. American taxpayers will shell out many times what their counterparts in developed cities in Europe and Asia would pay. In the case of the Second Avenue line and other new rail infrastructure in New York City, they may have to pay five times as much. Amtrak is just as bad. Its $151 billion master plan for basic high-speed rail service in the Northeast corridor is more expensive than Japan’s planned magnetic levitating train line between Tokyo and Osaka, most of which is to be buried deep underground, with tunnels through the Japan Alps and beneath its densest cities. - U.S. Taxpayers Are Gouged on Mass Transit Costs
posted by beisny on Aug 28, 2012 - 104 comments

Toronto transit

If you've ever wanted to know the history of each of Toronto's streetcar lines, how to identify different TTC subway trains, the chronology of Toronto's Christmas-painted buses, or really anything else you can think of (and more) about Toronto's transit system: Transit Toronto is an unofficial but fantastically detailed site about the TTC. [more inside]
posted by andrewesque on Jun 28, 2012 - 30 comments

Beautiful abandoned train stations

Beautiful abandoned train stations
posted by Trurl on May 24, 2012 - 11 comments

EV'ing through Africa

Frenchman Xavier Chevrin is driving an electric car 3,000 miles through Africa, from Nairobi to Johannesburg. Finding outlets is a challenge, about 65 percent of Africans do not have access to electricity. The daily video logs are a joy not only for the beautiful scenery along a contemporary African road trip, but the excitement of many Africans who have never seen an electric vehicle. The vehicle is a souped-up version of cars used by the French postal service, a Citroen Berlingo powered by Venturi. This is Xavier's 2nd long distance electric car expedition, previously he did Shanghai to Paris, it set the record for the longest distance traveled in an electric vehicle.
posted by stbalbach on May 23, 2012 - 9 comments

America's Pedestrian Problem

Tom Vanderbilt on walking in America, in four parts: The Crisis in American Walking, Sidewalk Science, What's Your Walk Score?, and Learning to Walk. (Previously on jaywalking and on cities for people.)
posted by parudox on Apr 13, 2012 - 92 comments

Why You Can’t Get a Taxi

Almost all the everyday complaints about cabs trace back to this regulatory cocktail. Drivers won’t take you to the outer reaches of your metropolitan area? The regulated fares won’t let them charge you more to recover the cost of dead-heading back without a return customer. Cabs are poorly maintained? Blame restricted competition, and the inability to charge for better quality. Cabbies drive like maniacs? With high fixed costs for cars and gas, and no way to increase their earnings except by finding another fare, is it any wonder that they try to get from place to place as fast as possible? Uber makes its money at least in part by alleviating these inefficiencies. In most places, “black car” or livery services are regulated differently, and more lightly, than taxis are. Though Uber has good reason not to say so, it’s basically turning livery services into cabs. The company is one step further removed from regulation, because it doesn’t run cars itself; it funnels passengers to existing services. “We’re sort of like an efficient lead-generation system for limo companies,” says Kalanick, “but with math involved.” - Megan McArdle analyses taxi regulation in the US and the taxi startup, Uber
posted by beisny on Apr 12, 2012 - 54 comments

Good for one fare

Twelve bus tickets from the 1930s
posted by mippy on Mar 16, 2012 - 33 comments

"Any nation, at any time, has the capacity to create a hero."

Neil deGrasse Tyson gives testimony on March 7, 2012 before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation (Majority member page) (Minority member page) Eight minutes of speech followed by questioning and response. [more inside]
posted by lazaruslong on Mar 8, 2012 - 80 comments

Dutch Kids Pedal Their Own Bus To School

In the Netherlands, bikes abound. And now, they even take kids to school. Behold, the bicycle school bus.
posted by Blasdelb on Feb 28, 2012 - 53 comments

When ODOT's not out plowing snow or repairing the roads we also enjoy blowing up old bridges.

Yesterday, the Ohio Dep't of Transportation blew up the Fort Steuben bridge between Steubenville, OH, and Weirton, WV. The bridge was 84 years old. [more inside]
posted by wikipedia brown boy detective on Feb 21, 2012 - 26 comments

"Technology presumes there's just one right way to do things and there never is." - Robert M. Pirsig

The Museum of RetroTechnology is a curated online collection of (mostly) obsolete inventions. The exhibitions include Gearwheels From Hell, the Dynosphere monowheel, Unusual Pedal Bicycles, Propeller-Driven Sleighs, Water Engines, Dog and Goat Engines, Acoustic Location and Sound Mirrors, Optical Telegraphs, and Combat Cutlery.
posted by troll on Feb 14, 2012 - 14 comments

Historical Travel Menus From Northwestern's Transportation Library

Food and drink menus from the international airlines, railways, and cruise ships of decades past (Click "Digital Images" link in each carrier's thread). Courtesy of the Northwestern University Transportation Library's Menu Collection. [Via]
posted by Rykey on Jan 28, 2012 - 25 comments

You can hear the whistle blow, across the Nile

When it comes to railways, the British are famous for their colonial legacy of one of the world's most extensive railway networks built across then British India but their lesser known and far grander vision was the Cape to Cairo railway network intended to stretch across the sea of colonial pink on the African continent. Left incomplete due to politics and geography, most of it is still almost as it was built in its day. [more inside]
posted by infini on Dec 22, 2011 - 27 comments

Washington DC without the Metro

As a part of it's 35th anniversary, WMATA produced a study that investigated a hypothetical where Washington DC's Metro system disappeared and was replaced by car infrastructure. [more inside]
posted by grandsham on Dec 12, 2011 - 56 comments

The NYDOT Presents: Curbside Haiku

Safety Warning Signs
Sprout From NYC Street Poles
It's Curbside Haiku!
[more inside]
posted by zarq on Nov 30, 2011 - 43 comments

Mapping with time rather than distance.

Time Maps maps the Netherlands based on how long it takes to reach a given destination rather than how far away it is.
We can reach almost any destination by train easily and relatively quick. In our busy lives we now think in time rather than distance[...]From the perspective of Eindhoven, for instance, the Netherlands is relatively small because of the quick and easy connections to other cities. At the same time, seen from a more remote and small village such as Stavoren the Netherlands is much bigger[...]At night the map will expand because there are no night trains and in the morning it will shrink once trains will commence their schedules. Here is a video demonstration.
posted by OmieWise on Nov 17, 2011 - 28 comments

An MBTA Business Day

What does a day's worth of activity look like for Boston's transportation system? Via bostonography, which has been featured previously.
posted by Eideteker on Nov 8, 2011 - 26 comments

Marred Record

Yesterday, Politico reporter Kendra Marr was forced to resign her position after New York Times writer Susan Stellin alerted Marr's editors to similarities between her transportation policy story published Sept. 26 and Marr’s story published Oct. 10. An investigation by Politico into Marr's work found 7 instances of likely plagiarism. Marr, who was formerly a reporter for the OC Register, San Jose Mercury News and the Washington Post, had logged 409 stories (scroll down for list) with Politico during her time there. The outlet has issued a statement. Poynter has a thorough rundown, indicating that more of her articles may come under scrutiny. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Oct 14, 2011 - 43 comments

The Atlantic Cities

The Atlantic Cities is a new site launched today by the Atlantic. It's about cities.
posted by parudox on Sep 15, 2011 - 23 comments

Sari fashion photography

Sari fashion photography (related) [more inside]
posted by Trurl on Sep 9, 2011 - 21 comments

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