454 posts tagged with UnitedStates.
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China’s annual human rights report on the US

Full text: The Human Rights Record of the United States in 2014. via
posted by infini on Jun 30, 2015 - 27 comments

"Our underlying goal is to make better clients"

Inside Obama's Stealth Startup Their mission: to reboot how government works.
posted by infini on Jun 16, 2015 - 67 comments

If you talk to American people, they smell like freedom

How do you distinguish Americans [from other nationalities]? Students from many different countries at Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (Japan) talk about what makes Americans different. (SLYT)
posted by desjardins on Jun 14, 2015 - 127 comments

Staggering

New U.S. government research indicates that female military veterans commit suicide at nearly six times the rate of other women and at rates nearly equal to that of male veterans -- a finding that surprised researchers because women are generally are far less likely than men to commit suicide. The findings raise questions about the backgrounds and experiences of women who serve in the United States' armed forces. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Jun 10, 2015 - 39 comments

The United States of Horror

Where everything went wrong. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on May 31, 2015 - 73 comments

What's in a name?

The Washington Post provides some insight into what your name says about you. [more inside]
posted by ourt on May 26, 2015 - 30 comments

“They bent over backwards to take care of me.”

A Nice Afternoon With The Women Of New Orleans’ Trans Veterans Support Group (SL Buzzfeed longform)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on May 26, 2015 - 9 comments

The movement is a sort of mosaic.

Wait, Women Don't Have Equal Rights in the United States? - Tabby Biddle, Huffington Post. The History Behind the ERA Amendment ( brief introduction, argument for why ERA is needed). March 22, 1972 | Equal Rights Amendment for Women Passed by Congress (NYT). Chronology of the Equal Rights Amendment, 1923-1996 (NOW). "The ERA Is a Moral Issue": The Mormon Church, LDS Women, and the Defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment (Neil J. Young, American Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 3, Sep., 2007)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 23, 2015 - 31 comments

Self-Inflicted Wounds

Several recent developments reveal how political and institutional fragmentation in the United States has produced self-inflicted wounds for the U.S. abroad. In all of these instances, America’s ability to exercise economic power in the world has been deliberately curtailed through decisions made unilaterally in Washington by American political leaders.

posted by infini on May 20, 2015 - 19 comments

"You don't want a criminal lawyer. You want a *criminal* lawyer."

The New Mexico Law Review just published an issue dedicated entirely to Breaking Bad. It features eight articles that analyze the illegal acts committed on the show, their real-world parallels, and the consequences attached:
Given the array of legal issues raised, our editorial board was excited to take the opportunity to present analysis of Breaking Bad by scholars and legal practitioners. In April 2014 we issued a call for papers requesting abstracts on topics including the application of the Fourth Amendment to drug crimes under the New Mexico and/or U.S. Constitutions; the War on Drugs; ethical duties of lawyers; drug-offense sentencing; drug enforcement in rural, urban, and/or Tribal areas; and substance abuse and the law.
Some of the greatest legal minds in New Mexico (and the country) came together to examine how Walter White would look to a jury, how the war on drugs affects peripheral citizens like Skyler, and whether Heisenberg could have stayed legit by fighting for his stake in Grey Matter in the courts. [via] [more inside]
posted by Room 641-A on May 19, 2015 - 25 comments

What are you sharing with me anyway?

Disruption’s Tragic Flaw The case of Uber shows why European companies should not follow the example of their American competitors too closely. It pays to take the needs of customers and contractors into account.
posted by infini on May 14, 2015 - 44 comments

Only in America

Q: What do the US, Somalia, and South Sudan have in common? A: It's totally cool to put kids in jail forever.
At 38, Adolfo Davis is re-sentenced to life imprisonment as an accomplice to a gang murder when he was 14.
“The defendant’s acts showed an aggression and callous disregard for human life far beyond his tender age of 14.” [more inside]
posted by TheNegativeInfluence on May 5, 2015 - 40 comments

So many more stories of fascinating and brilliant women to be told

"Every one of these sites is worthy of visiting." Sophia Dembling highlights U.S. women's museums and sites for The Toast. Related: Women in Game Developement, a recently opened exhibit at the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment in Oakland, California. This exhibit features the work of early developers like Roberta Williams, Carol Shaw, Amy Henning, and more — see MADE's webpage for full list and game screenshots.
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on May 1, 2015 - 5 comments

How Baltimore became Baltimore

The Washington Post sheds some much needed, highly relevant historical context on "[t]he long, painful and repetitive history of how Baltimore became Baltimore". [more inside]
posted by ourt on Apr 30, 2015 - 32 comments

Isaiah 11:6

"More than sixty years have passed since Israel started its nuclear venture and almost half a century has elapsed since it crossed the nuclear weapons threshold. Yet Israel's nuclear history still lacks a voice of its own: Israel has never issued an authorized and official nuclear history; no insiders have ever been authorized to tell the story from within. Unlike all seven other nuclear weapons states, Israel's nuclear policy is essentially one of non-acknowledgement. Israel believes that nuclear silence is golden, referring to its nuclear code of conduct as the policy of amimut ("opacity" in Hebrew)." A special collection of declassified documents was published by the National Security Archive this Wednesday, that sheds some light on How Israel Hid Its Secret Nuclear Weapons Program.
posted by zarq on Apr 17, 2015 - 138 comments

Shane Ortega served three combat tours: two as a woman, one as a man.

Army soldier Shane Ortega comes out as transgender as the military evaluates their policies on transgender service members. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the US lags behind other countries in allowing people to serve openly. [more inside]
posted by desjardins on Apr 16, 2015 - 4 comments

The Richer and the Poorer

The Washington Post reports what the rich and poor actually spend their money on, and where [more inside]
posted by ourt on Apr 14, 2015 - 52 comments

The Man Camp AKA The Profit Center

"Post Hurricane Katrina, a whole new American dream was designed for some [South Asian] Indians — how to get trapped in a guarded labor camp by an American company".
posted by ursus_comiter on Apr 13, 2015 - 12 comments

The Road from Westphalia

Jessica T. Matthews reviews Henry Kissinger's "World Order" and Bret Stephen's "America In Retreat":
Almost from the beginning of its history, America has struggled to find a balance in its foreign policy between narrowly promoting its own security and idealistically serving the interests of others; between, as we’ve tended to see it in shorthand, Teddy Roosevelt’s big stick and the ideals of Woodrow Wilson. Just as consistently, the US has gone through periods of embracing a leading international role for itself and times when Americans have done all they could to turn their backs on the rest of the world. Two new books now join this never-ending debate.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Mar 30, 2015 - 20 comments

The TSA checklist

A 92-point checklist, obtained and published by The Intercept, reveals what kind of passenger behavior can merit a red flag for TSA agents responsible for pulling out possible terrorists and criminals out of airport security lines. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 27, 2015 - 113 comments

Well, San Francisco's right out...

The salary you need to buy a median-priced home in 27 US cities.
posted by Blue Jello Elf on Mar 13, 2015 - 127 comments

The perception is that it’s just one disgruntled soldier

NYMag profiles American military deserters in Canada, Germany and the Netherlands.
Desertion is always a solitary choice, but it can be especially so for those who seek refuge in other countries. The deserter in exile is cut off from community, family, and country, knowing there may never be a safe way home. For the alienated troops who fled to Canada in the early years of the Iraq War, the decision seemed to offer solace. The northern border has always welcomed disaffected Americans, from the British Union Loyalists who opposed the Revolutionary War to the draft dodgers and deserters avoiding Vietnam. Between 1965 and 1975, roughly 50,000 U.S. citizens took shelter in Canada, where the Liberal Party of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau quietly embraced them. In the first three years of the Iraq War, at least 200 new American troops joined them, believing they would find the same open arms. Most of the new deserters chose to live and work in cities like Toronto and Montreal without revealing their military past; only about two dozen stepped forward publicly to request political amnesty as “war resisters.”

posted by frimble on Feb 27, 2015 - 15 comments

Inside the Koch Brothers' Toxic Empire

On the day before Danielle Smalley was to leave for college, she and her friend Jason Stone were hanging out in her family's mobile home. Seventeen years old, with long chestnut hair, Danielle began to feel nauseated. "Dad," she said, "we smell gas." It was 3:45 in the afternoon on August 24th, 1996, near Lively, Texas, some 50 miles southeast of Dallas. The Smalleys were too poor to own a telephone. So the teens jumped into her dad's 1964 Chevy pickup to alert the authorities. As they drove away, the truck stalled where the driveway crossed a dry creek bed. Danielle cranked the ignition, and a fireball engulfed the truck. "You see two children burned to death in front of you – you never forget that," Danielle's father, Danny, would later tell reporters. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Feb 16, 2015 - 84 comments

When Children With Autism Grow Up

"I was 23 and needed a summer job; he was 21 and needed full-time support. He’s one of an estimated half million people diagnosed with autism who are soon becoming adults — and who society is entirely unprepared for." (Note: graphic description of sexual abuse; SL Buzzfeed)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Feb 9, 2015 - 25 comments

It's 2015 and inequality looks like it's going to be here for a while

Oxfam's latest report ahead of the World Economics Forum in Davos says that "by next year, 1% of the world’s population will own more wealth than the other 99%." [more inside]
posted by mostly vowels on Jan 19, 2015 - 126 comments

"This is whataboutery with a TARDIS"

It was with a heavy heart and no small amount of anger that I decided it was necessary to write a public refutation of the insidious myth that the Irish were once chattel slaves in the British colonies. The subject of this myth is not an issue in academic circles, for there is unanimous agreement, based on overwhelming evidence, that the Irish were never subjected to perpetual, hereditary slavery in the colonies, based on notions of ‘race’. Unfortunately this is not the case in the public domain and the ‘Irish slaves’ myth has been shared so frequently online that it has gone viral.
For OpenDemocracy, Laim Hogan writes a short article on the myth of Irish slavery, extracted from his larger essay 'The myth of “Irish slaves” in the colonies'. This has become relevant again in the wake of Ferguson as white supremacists and others use it to disparage and minimise African-American history and suffering: "the Irish don't ask for reparations and they were slaves".
posted by MartinWisse on Jan 19, 2015 - 97 comments

"Well, I dunno. You have a crazy-ass job, sir."

The Alabama legislature has introduced a unique dimension to the debate over reproductive rights in the United States: the allocation of state funds to provide lawyers to fetuses in abortion cases involving minors seeking an exemption from parental notification laws. The appointment of fetal guardians ad litem is enumerated in House bill HB 494, which went into effect on July 1, 2014.

Last week, Daily Show correspondent Jessica Williams -- recently named one of TIME's 12 New Faces of Black Leadership -- sat down to interview one of the lawyers, Montgomery civil rights attorney Julian McPhillips, about some of the ramifications of HB 494: The Unborn Ultimatum. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Jan 18, 2015 - 105 comments

Why is this white man so angry?

White Fragility is a state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable. A 2011 paper by Robin DiAngelo, author, Associate Professor of Multicultural Education, and workplace diversity trainer, explores the challenges of confronting racism which result from the inability of white people to accept that they are beneficiaries of a racist system. (PDF)
posted by emjaybee on Jan 10, 2015 - 126 comments

How Women of Color Are Driving Entrepreneurship in the US

Women of color are a principal force behind one of the most important components of America’s current marketplace and our nation’s future economy: entrepreneurship. Today, women of color are the majority owners of close to one-third of all women-owned firms in the nation. Increased access to business capital—including microenterprises, venture-capital-funded firms, and crowd funding—has helped the number of women entrepreneurs grow substantially. But women of color face significant obstacles in starting their own businesses, leading to the question of why so many of them turn to entrepreneurship. The growth of women of color as business owners is part of a long-term trend, but the question of why this trend is occurring is often left unanswered. Looking at the alternative to entrepreneurship—the traditional workplace—sheds light on some of the reasons.

posted by infini on Jan 9, 2015 - 9 comments

A Sword Among Lions

"We all appreciate what you're doing"
"But?"
"But you're LOUD and you say uncomfortable things and it is Victorian times"
"So what makes people uncomfortable in Victorian times?"
"I don't know, being alive?" [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 31, 2014 - 12 comments

"We're also thankful for Mississippi"

50 Americans Summarize Their Home State In One Perfectly Sarcastic Sentence [SLCB]
posted by Jacqueline on Dec 31, 2014 - 90 comments

This is the time. And this is the record of the time.

Over 30 years since it was finally presented in full as a two-night, seven-and-a-half hour multimedia opera only a handful of times in only three cities, Laurie Anderson is revisiting her seminal work United States with United States V. Produced by pomegranate arts, who recently brought back Philip Glass' Einstein On The Beach. [more inside]
posted by hippybear on Dec 31, 2014 - 34 comments

Cards Against the Darkness

Cards Against Humanity + Sunlight Foundation team up, give the gift of financial disclosure.
posted by curious nu on Dec 23, 2014 - 24 comments

The Barbarous Years

The Shocking Savagery of America's Early History, a look at historian Bernard Bailyn's book.
Bailyn has not painted a pretty picture. Little wonder he calls it The Barbarous Years and spares us no details of the terror, desperation, degradation and widespread torture—do you really know what being “flayed alive” means? (The skin is torn from the face and head and the prisoner is disemboweled while still alive.) And yet somehow amid the merciless massacres were elements that gave birth to the rudiments of civilization—or in Bailyn’s evocative phrase, the fragile “integument of civility”—that would evolve 100 years later into a virtual Renaissance culture, a bustling string of self-governing, self-sufficient, defiantly expansionist colonies alive with an increasingly sophisticated and literate political and intellectual culture that would coalesce into the rationale for the birth of American independence. All the while shaping, and sometimes misshaping, the American character. It’s a grand drama in which the glimmers of enlightenment barely survive the savagery, what Yeats called “the blood-dimmed tide,” the brutal establishment of slavery, the race wars with the original inhabitants that Bailyn is not afraid to call “genocidal,” the full, horrifying details of which have virtually been erased.
[more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 20, 2014 - 42 comments

US drone strikes: data analysis

41 men targeted, but 1,147 people killed: New analysis of data conducted by the human rights group Reprieve raises questions about the accuracy of intelligence guiding 'precise' drone strikes.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Dec 19, 2014 - 84 comments

Seattle’s unbelievable transportation megaproject fustercluck

Seattle's unbelievable transportation megaproject fustercluck — "In short: There is no plan to resolve the dispute over cost overruns, which are ubiquitous on projects like this; at $4.2 billion, it's the most expensive transportation project in state history. The tunnel will have no exits - no ingress or egress - throughout the entire downtown core (which makes the support of downtown businesses all the more mystifying). It won't allow transit, only cars. It will be tolled, highly enough, by the state's own estimates, to drive nearly half its traffic onto the aforementioned side streets. It will be a precarious engineering feat, the widest deep-bore tunnel in history, digging right between a) Puget Sound and b) the oldest part of Seattle, with vulnerable buildings and God-knows-what buried infrastructure. Also: Pollution. Climate change. It's the 21st f'ing century. On and on. People said all this and more, in real time, to no avail." [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Dec 16, 2014 - 166 comments

Lennon Lacy

The FBI announced today that they will open an investigation into the death of 17 year old Lennon Lacy. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 12, 2014 - 39 comments

The River of Money

MapLight is a database that "looks at big industries and big interests, their elected beneficiaries and their votes." They also run Voter's Edge for personalized election information. Check out the contributions by vote on Net Neutrality and the Keystone XL pipeline. Maplight also contributes to the national law review. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 10, 2014 - 2 comments

"The contrast between the treatment of produce and of people is stark."

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables — the first in a series of four Los Angeles Times long-form stories about labor conditions discovered during an 18-month investigation of Mexican vegetable farms that supply produce to the United States. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Dec 8, 2014 - 38 comments

Veteran Art Project

The Veteran Art Project is a visual experiment by 27-year-old photographer Devin Mitchell "who is exploring a part of the veteran’s experience that is sometimes difficult to articulate." [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Dec 5, 2014 - 2 comments

ISIS: What the US Doesn’t Understand

Over the last few days, as the United States has stepped up its bombing campaign against ISIS in Syria, it has been hard to escape another reality: the US is still looking for a coherent strategy against the Islamic State. [more inside]
posted by standardasparagus on Dec 2, 2014 - 98 comments

"Work Therapy"

Tampa homeless program uses unpaid, destitute residents as steady labor force, revenue source [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Nov 30, 2014 - 64 comments

"the family is the unit of cultural preservation."

"Eat Turkey, Become American." (SLNYTimes essay)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Nov 27, 2014 - 10 comments

Bob's your uncle and Bertha's your aunt

Aunt Bertha is a web-based platform that connects Americans in need to locally available government programs, non-profit organizations, and community-based resources that offer free or low-cost assistance with health and dental care, job placement, emergency and long-term shelter, clothing and household goods, child and elder care, legal aid, assistance with navigating the social safety net, and much more. All programs are searchable and sortable by ZIP code, city, or eligibility. Find food, health, housing, job training programs and more, anywhere. [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Nov 26, 2014 - 28 comments

Somewhere in-between Chop Suey and Pork Roll, the truth lies.

Recently on The Blue we've had discussions about American Chop Suey and New Jersey Pork Roll, but what about other regional favorites, like Lutefisk, Scrapple, or the French Dip Sandwich? Just in time for Thanksgiving, here are a few links to get you started:

posted by Room 641-A on Nov 17, 2014 - 97 comments

The first step is admitting that you have a problem.

The US and China just reached a major climate deal on cutting emissions. [more inside]
posted by tonycpsu on Nov 11, 2014 - 46 comments

Vintage photo finds

Vintage Photo Finds is a site with vintage photographs. According to creator Joel Snow:
The following pictures were found as negatives at the bottom of a cardboard box at a flea market. I shot them with my SLR on a lightbox and inverted them back to positives with Photshop. I'm not sure if it was a single photographer, or many, but many of the shots show an artistic and creative eye and share a similar style.
[more inside]
posted by tykky on Nov 5, 2014 - 9 comments

"...a tragic and extreme version of a familiar pattern"

One-Fifth of Detroit's Population Could Lose Their Homes Many families could stay put for just a few hundred dollars, if only they knew how to work the system. (SLAtlantic)
posted by tonycpsu on Oct 24, 2014 - 30 comments

All cities are mad, but the madness is gallant.

Planned cities are not a new idea (Palmanova, Italy, 1593). From Washington, D.C. (1791), to Canberra, Australia (1911), to Brasilia, Brazil (1957), planned cities have long been an urban dream (from space), perhaps most frequently applied to national capitals. But they don't always work out as planned. [more inside]
posted by Eyebrows McGee on Oct 14, 2014 - 34 comments

Race and indigeneity

Can New Zealand teach the US anything about race?
The US was founded on the idea of freedom and liberty. But freedom and liberty, which might be called the “sacred” values of American society, were exclusive ideas. In the colonial period there was, writes Dee Brown in Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, “an almost reverential attitude toward the ideal of personal freedom for those who already had it.” Treaties are the mechanism to extend that freedom and liberty – that is, the right to self determination – to indigenous peoples who were promised it, but do not have full exercise of it.

posted by gaspode on Oct 13, 2014 - 25 comments

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