86 posts tagged with Vanityfair.
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“The power of the office is unique and it is a humbling privilege.”

Barack Obama and Doris Kearns Goodwin: The Ultimate Exit Interview [Vanity Fair] As his two-term presidency draws to a close, Barack Obama is looking back—at the legacies of his predecessors, as well as his own—and forward, to the freedom of life after the White House. In a wide-ranging conversation with one of the nation’s foremost presidential historians, he talks about his ambitions, frustrations, and the decisions that still haunt him.
posted by Fizz on Sep 24, 2016 - 42 comments

Sisyphus at 67

“One of the points I’m making in the book is that, whoever you’ve been and wherever you’ve been, it never leaves you,” he said, expanding upon this thought with the most Springsteen-esque metaphor possible: “I always picture it as a car. All your selves are in it. And a new self can get in, but the old selves can’t ever get out. The important thing is, who’s got their hands on the wheel at any given moment?” Bruce Springsteen in Vanity Fair, on his new memoir.
posted by chavenet on Sep 6, 2016 - 18 comments

lol @ theranos

HOW ELIZABETH HOLMES’S HOUSE OF CARDS CAME TUMBLING DOWN
posted by Sticherbeast on Sep 6, 2016 - 112 comments

Olivia de Havilland: still alive and in Vanity Fair

“I loved her so much as a child,” Olivia says wistfully. Ever the lady, she has steadfastly refused to discuss her sister or their relationship since the 1950s. Not so Joan. In a 1978 interview with People—a forceful blast of sua culpa meant to publicize No Bed of Roses—Joan flatly contradicted Olivia’s recollection of sibling tenderness, saying, “I regret that I remember not one act of kindness from Olivia all through my childhood.”--Olivia de Havilland and the Most Notorious Sibling Rivalry in Hollywood
posted by MoonOrb on May 22, 2016 - 11 comments

“Whoops, I lost me muff!”

Arno the socialite stayed at the Ritz-Carlton until dawn, keeping Frazier company, and was captured in photos holding her hand while the 17-year-old looks utterly exhausted by the event. (She was.) Five nights earlier, Arno the satirist and his friends—publisher Condé Nast and George Balanchine among them—held a well-publicized debut at the nightclub Chez Firehouse for Miss Wilma Baard. A fashion model, Baard had spent much of her childhood on a Hoboken tugboat captained by her father, so reporters at the event dubbed it the debut of “Tugboat Minnie.” “I think most debutantes are dopes,” she told reporters. While Arno and his friends worked the receiving line in shifts, she stood there for hours, saying only of society that it made “my feet hurt.” - The Double Life of Peter Arno, The New Yorker's Most Influental Cartoonist by Ben Schwartz (NSFW warning: butts)
posted by The Whelk on Apr 6, 2016 - 26 comments

$5, same as in town

"Swipe Buster, he said, was an attempt, albeit perhaps a prurient and sordid one, to use a popular company (Tinder) and a juicy lure (cheating) in order to educate people about how much of their personal data is out there and how easily people can get access to it without hacking or breaking rules. (Swipe Buster was originally called Tinder Buster. It changed its name and URL on Sunday evening.)" — Here’s How You Can Check if Your Partner Is Cheating on Tinder by Emily Jane Fox for Vanity Fair. Previously: Tinder Confidential, and relatedly: Ashley Madison has been hacked. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Apr 4, 2016 - 8 comments

Of Smoothies and (Internet News) Cycles

LIGHTS UP
Buzzfeed: “Gwyneth Paltrow drinks $200 smoothies for breakfast!”
Vanity Fair: “Actually, they’re just $10.52 smoothies.”
Washington Post: “Whatever! It’s a good excuse for us to make a video and talk about the theoretical health benefits.”
fin.
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 24, 2016 - 49 comments

“In my family, a B-flat was a fuckin’ B-flat.”

How Randy Newman and His Family Have Shaped Movie Music for Generations by David Kamp [Vanity Fair] Sure, you know of the Oscar-winning composer behind Toy Story and his endearingly offbeat songwriting, but Newman, 72, is also the patriarch of a clan that has helped shape movie music since the talkies. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Feb 26, 2016 - 46 comments

by Joseph E. Stiglitz

China Has Overtaken the U.S. as the World’s Largest Economy
posted by infini on Feb 21, 2016 - 45 comments

In my dreams, I was inventing literature

Gabriel García Márquez began writing Cien Años de Soledad—One Hundred Years of Solitude—a half-century ago, finishing in late 1966. The novel came off the press in Buenos Aires on May 30, 1967, two days before Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was released, and the response among Spanish-language readers was akin to Beatlemania: crowds, cameras, exclamation points, a sense of a new era beginning. In 1970 the book appeared in English, followed by a paperback edition with a burning sun on its cover, which became a totem of the decade. By the time García Márquez was awarded the Nobel Prize, in 1982, the novel was considered the Don Quixote of the Global South, proof of Latin-American literary prowess. [...] How is it that this novel could be sexy, entertaining, experimental, politically radical, and wildly popular all at once? Its success was no sure thing, and the story of how it came about is a crucial and little-known chapter in the literary history of the last half-century.
The Secret History of One Hundred Years of Solitude
posted by shakespeherian on Dec 13, 2015 - 12 comments

Ermahgerd!

The Untold Story of The Ermahgerd Girl
posted by Fuzzy Monster on Oct 16, 2015 - 58 comments

From Chaplin to Zuckerberg

The Evolution of Magazine Covers
posted by fearfulsymmetry on Aug 27, 2015 - 15 comments

"A fuckboy is a man who is lame, who sucks, who ain’t shit."

The Definition of 'Fuckboy' Is Not What Bad Trend Pieces Are Telling You
posted by Elementary Penguin on Aug 21, 2015 - 129 comments

Spoiler alert: it’s not much.

"When someone like Chris Pratt lands back-to-back roles in some of the biggest movies of the year, that’s headline news. But when a charismatic, quirky actress like Judy Greer does the same, well, blink and you might miss her. The comedic actress—best known for her scene-stealing work in shows like Arrested Development and movies like The Descendants—showed up in four major 2015 films: Tomorrowland, Entourage, Jurassic World, and Ant-Man." Here’s Every Single Line Judy Greer Had in a Movie This Summer.
posted by everybody had matching towels on Jul 31, 2015 - 56 comments

"I'm very new, yes. Very new and very shit."

Daniel Radcliffe Was Our Receptionist for an Hour [SLYT]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 17, 2015 - 57 comments

Be terrifying.

Vanity Fair profiles Kelly Sue DeConnick, writer of the comics Captain Marvel, Pretty Deadly, and Bitch Planet.
posted by Stacey on Jul 9, 2015 - 44 comments

Comedy Dillane, Bureaucratic Dillane, Vulnerable Dillane

10 Great Performances from Game of Thrones Actors to Help You Fill the Void (Also on FanFare)
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jun 16, 2015 - 62 comments

How Ford Models Changed the Face of Beauty

The little-known story behind a pair of young newlyweds in post–World War II Manhattan who launched the era of the supermodel.
posted by ellieBOA on Jun 4, 2015 - 4 comments

#CallMeCaitlyn

Introducing Caitlyn Jenner [Vanity Fair]
Speaking publicly for the first time since completing gender transition, Caitlyn Jenner compares her emotional two-day photo shoot with Annie Leibovitz for the July cover of Vanity Fair to winning the gold medal for the decathlon at the 1976 Olympics. She tells Pulitzer Prize–winning V.F. contributing editor and author of Friday Night Lights Buzz Bissinger, “That was a good day, but the last couple of days were better. . . . This shoot was about my life and who I am as a person. It’s not about the fanfare, it’s not about people cheering in the stadium, it’s not about going down the street and everybody giving you ‘that a boy, Bruce,’ pat on the back, O.K. This is about your life.”
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jun 1, 2015 - 163 comments

Understanding Kim Jong Un

"Nothing better defines Kim than how little we actually know about him. When asked, even the most respected outside experts on North Korea in the United States and in South Korea—not to mention inside the White House—invariably provide details that turn out to be traceable to Dennis Rodman or to a Japanese sushi chef named Kenji Fujimoto, who was employed by the ruling family from 1988 to 2001, and who now peddles trivial details about them (such as how Kim II once sent him to Beijing to pick up some food at McDonald’s)."
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 23, 2015 - 48 comments

An Oral History of Laurel Canyon in the 60s and 70s

JONI MITCHELL: Ask anyone in America where the craziest people live and they'll tell you California. Ask anyone in California where the craziest people live and they'll say Los Angeles. Ask anyone in Los Angeles where the craziest people live and they'll tell you Hollywood. Ask anyone in Hollywood where the craziest people live and they'll say Laurel Canyon. And ask anyone in Laurel Canyon where the craziest people live and they'll say Lookout Mountain. So I bought a house on Lookout Mountain. [more inside]
posted by sallybrown on Feb 9, 2015 - 64 comments

The Horrors of Solitary Confinement

Two centuries ago, America was a pioneer in the use of punitive isolation. Now it is pioneering a refinement: the use of solitary without end.
posted by MoonOrb on Feb 2, 2015 - 52 comments

"There is hope!"

As the West African Ebola epidemic stretches into its 10th month: researchers have identified the likely cause of the initial outbreak: a young boy playing with bats in a village in Guinea. The NY Times considers how the opportunity to contain the epidemic was missed and the effects of Ebola on West African economies. Vanity Fair takes a look at the failure to contain the disease within Guinea, Frontline goes to "Ground Zero" in Guinea, and searches for a missing Ebola patient. Meanwhile, West Africans welcomed Christmas (previously) and the New Year. Africa Stop Ebola!
posted by ChuraChura on Jan 2, 2015 - 14 comments

The Place for Royalty and The Right Sort of Young

When Mark Birley died at the age of 77 he left behind a legacy of London nightclubs for the aristocratic set ...and a highly contested $200 million dollar estate with last second will changes, phony ex-girlfriends, and feuding children. Maureen Orth explores the family life of the nightlife king.
posted by The Whelk on Dec 12, 2014 - 10 comments

The Empire Reboots

Can Satya Nadella Save Microsoft? (Longform) Great Vanity Fair article that spends a lot of time examining the Gates/Ballmer dynamic.
posted by Nevin on Oct 9, 2014 - 45 comments

Everybody say, "Is he all right?" And everybody say, "What's he like?"

"Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Long Suicide of Montgomery Clift" by Anne Helen Petersen for Vanity Fair. (Warning: graphic description of car accident in the link.) [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Sep 30, 2014 - 21 comments

How The Simpsons Co-Creator Sam Simon Is Facing His Own Tragedy

Diagnosed with terminal cancer two years ago, and given only months to live, Sam Simon is still alive and still racing to spend the fortune he made as co-creator of The Simpsons on causes he loves, whether he is rescuing grizzly bears (and chinchillas and elephants) or funding vegan food banks. Sam Simon and philanthropy previously on Metafilter
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 29, 2014 - 7 comments

"No negativity—we just want to be admired."

Generation Wuss » by Bret Easton Ellis [Vanity Fair]
"In his books, he used to shoot at the materialistic excesses of his generation. But today, youth has become Bret Easton Ellis' favorite target. According to him, young people are just too sensitive, too narcissistic ,too stupid. But ultimately, as he explains in this exclusive text, he kind of feel sorry for them ( and they love it !)."
posted by Fizz on Sep 28, 2014 - 64 comments

" They were paying for an experience. "

Behind Claude’s Doors
In 1960s Paris she became known as the world’s most exclusive madam, whose client list was said to include John Kennedy, de Gaulle, Onassis, and multiple Rothschilds, and whose beautiful and cultivated girls often went on to marry wealth, power, and prestige. But among the many secrets Madame Claude kept, perhaps the greatest were her own. William Stadiem, who knew the elusive Claude in the 1980s, follows her trail to the South of France.
[more inside] posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 22, 2014 - 14 comments

"I sorely wished for some sign of understanding from the feminist camp."

I have lived many of the questions that have become central to our national discourse since 1998. How far should we allow the government into our bedrooms? How do we reconcile the right to privacy with the need to expose sexual indiscretion? How do we guard against an overzealous government demanding our private data and information? And, most important to me personally, how do we cope with the shame game as it’s played in the Internet Age? - Monica Lewinsky for Vanity Fair
posted by porn in the woods on May 28, 2014 - 46 comments

"When you’re a fat woman, taking up space is an affront to femininity."

What that Louie episode got right and wrong about fat women. After Sunday night's airing of Louie, some thoughtful, angry, interesting articles about how the show dealt with the issue of female body-shaming have popped up. But should the issue of fat-shaming women really be brought up by men?
posted by Kitteh on May 14, 2014 - 126 comments

Elvis at 21: Alfred Wertheimer talks about his famous photos

blood, dirt, & angels features audio clips of photographer Alfred Wertheimer discussing several iconic photographs he took in 1956 of Elvis Presley. Among them: The Kiss. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 16, 2014 - 1 comment

But down in the underground, you'll find a series of tubes...

Deep below the streets of New York City lie its vital organs—a water system, subways, railroads, tunnels, sewers, drains, and power and cable lines—in a vast, three-dimensional tangle. Penetrating this centuries-old underworld of caverns, squatters, and unmarked doors, William Langewiesche follows three men who constantly navigate its dangers: the subway-operations chief who dealt with the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, the engineer in charge of three underground mega-projects, and the guy who, well, just loves exploring the dark, jerry-rigged heart of a great metropolis. What Lies Beneath.
posted by Ghostride The Whip on Oct 26, 2013 - 21 comments

Boobs!

Judd Apatow and Maria Bamford remember the '90s for Vanity Fair.
posted by anothermug on Oct 5, 2013 - 34 comments

It's Not Time to Worry Yet

To Steal A Mockingbird The notoriously private author Harper Lee is now waging a public courtroom battle. Her lawsuit charges that in 2007 her agent, Samuel Pinkus, duped the frail 80-year-old Lee into assigning him the copyright to her only book, To Kill a Mockingbird—then diverted royalties from the beloved 1960 classic. (SLVF)
posted by box on Aug 2, 2013 - 38 comments

Listicles all the way down

40 Signs you are a Buzzfeed Writer Running Out of List Ideas
posted by Frayed Knot on Jul 9, 2013 - 68 comments

A C*nt and His iPhone

Continuously exasperated Tumblr Jesus Christ, Silicon Valley really lets loose [NSFW] at a Vanity Fair profile of Dave Morin, creator of the hip alternative social media app Path.
posted by Joakim Ziegler on Apr 30, 2013 - 112 comments

"It Tastes Like Steak"

"Steak is the defining mouthful of our time" (A.A. Gill, for Vanity Fair)
posted by box on Apr 11, 2013 - 102 comments

'Do you think you’re going to give this part to somebody else?'

The Making of 'Pulp Fiction' as told by Quentin Tarantino and the cast. Plus ephemera, a QT death chart, and Marvin.
posted by xowie on Feb 19, 2013 - 56 comments

I would respect you like CRAZY

For Vanity Fair's Comedy issue, the groundbreaking improvisational comedy duo of Mike Nichols and Elaine May sit down (but don't quite sit still) for their first joint interview in decades.
posted by Horace Rumpole on Jan 5, 2013 - 8 comments

Look Out—He’s Got a Phone!

Security experts agree that it’s only a matter of time before smartphones become the smart person’s murder weapon of choice.
posted by stoneweaver on Dec 20, 2012 - 56 comments

"Michelin-starred restaurants began to look and taste the same."

Vanity Fair: What's Wrong With The Michelin Guide. Esquire:Why It's Hard To Trust The Michelin Standards. FT:Star-Crossed: Once universally revered, the Michelin Guide is now dismissed by some as a relic of a bygone age
posted by the man of twists and turns on Dec 14, 2012 - 56 comments

"From the beginning, we thought that everything about the show should be painfully, painstakingly real."

My friends and I weren’t popular in high school, we weren’t dating all the time, and we were just trying to get through our lives. It was important to me to show that side. I wanted to leave a chronicle—to make people who had gone through it laugh, but also as a primer for kids going in, to say, “Here’s what you can expect. It’s horrifying but all you should really care about is getting through it. Get your friends, have your support group. And learn to be able to laugh at it.”
The Oral History of Freaks and Geeks [more inside]
posted by mokin on Dec 6, 2012 - 75 comments

on Kate Moss, and "taking one for the team"

On Kate Moss, and Taking One for the Team: "So, earlier this week Vanity Fair published a rare interview with Moss, in which the model, who is well-known for her circumspection, is unusually frank about the early years of her career. Moss was still a skinny, gangly teenager when she was plucked from mediocrity in Croydon and catapulted to superstardom. She was barely an adult, almost still a child, when she did her first topless photo shoot, with Corinne Day for The Face. In the interview, she talks about how uncomfortable this made her... This isn't the only the only revelation Moss made during the interview. It also turns out that the famous Calvin Klein campaign she did in 1992 with Mark Wahlberg gave her a nervous breakdown... Conveniently ignoring the fact that when the pictures were taken, Moss wasn't 'the face of the '90s', but a skinny teenage girl who cried because she was made to take her clothes off, Needham continues by saying that Moss' skinny frame 'seemed to encapsulate the euphoria of those long-distant times.'" [more inside]
posted by flex on Nov 5, 2012 - 92 comments

“He would roll his eyes and say, ‘Jeez, can you believe it?’”

Cruise post-Cruz was apparently tired of having ... ecclesiastical pillow fights interfere with his sex life: he needed a devout Scientologist to sleep with. Thus began an elaborate auditioning process ... to find him a drop-dead-beautiful true believer to share his life
Maureen Orth charts the rise—and fall—of a celebrity marriage. [more inside]
posted by Sonny Jim on Sep 28, 2012 - 95 comments

Obama’s Way

"To understand how air-force navigator Tyler Stark ended up in a thornbush in the Libyan desert in March 2011, one must understand what it’s like to be president of the United States—and this president in particular. Hanging around Barack Obama for six months, in the White House, aboard Air Force One, and on the basketball court, Michael Lewis learns the reality of the Nobel Peace Prize winner who sent Stark into combat."
posted by vidur on Sep 11, 2012 - 55 comments

Three Double Lives

From Vanity Fair, The Murder Hustle: In 1988, 'When businessman Gene Hanson died in a California doctor's office, his partner, John Hawkins, a former Studio 54 bartender, got $1 million in insurance. Nine months later, Hanson was caught in Texas with a new face and a new name, Wolfgang Von Snowden. He and the doctor are awaiting trial for murder. Hawkins, a scam artist and sex addict, has disappeared with the money. Ann Louise Bardach investigates three double lives in the business community of Columbus, Ohio, the Genet underground of West Hollywood, and the luxury condos of Miami's Biscayne Bay.' Part 1. [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Aug 3, 2012 - 18 comments

“Buy my art . . . or I’ll kick your ass.”

Sponge-Fraud!: 'Artist Todd White seemingly had it all. With a multi-million-dollar art brand, collectors and clients ranging from Sylvester Stallone to Coca-Cola, and a burgeoning reputation in art-mad Britain, his days as lead character designer of SpongeBob SquarePants were but a distant memory. But, as David Kushner reports, when his confidante and gallerist Peggy Howell reported a burglary of his paintings at the hand of ninjas, things took a turn for the even stranger.' [more inside]
posted by the man of twists and turns on Jun 26, 2012 - 23 comments

A Case So Cold It Was Blue

"A Case So Cold It Was Blue" is about Sherri Rasmussen's unsolved murder. [more inside]
posted by Avenger50 on Jun 20, 2012 - 17 comments

Another Night to Remember

"I never believed this could still happen in 2012." The sinking of the Costa Concordia. In slides.
posted by Avenger50 on Apr 20, 2012 - 57 comments

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