219 posts tagged with VietNam.
Displaying 1 through 50 of 219. Subscribe:

A Drawing Of A Crying Lady Liberty At The Pearly Gates

In 1967 political cartoonist Pat Oliphant drew an editorial cartoon just to win the Pulitizer - "one of the worst cartoons I've ever drawn" - trying to appeal to the judges' tastes and prevailing political opinion. And guess what happened.
posted by The Whelk on Aug 10, 2016 - 38 comments

North vs South Vietnam

A History of Pho
posted by Bee'sWing on Jun 2, 2016 - 41 comments

The Graves of the Marines I Lost

"In the early hours of Jan. 26, 2005, one of two large Marine helicopters transporting troops for this expanded and therefore riskier mission crashed, killing all onboard: 30 Marines and a Navy corpsman....I promised myself that night that I would visit all 31 grave sites. I needed to get a sense of where these military service members came from: the schools and churches they attended; the streets where they learned to drive; the neighborhoods where many of their families still lived."
posted by roomthreeseventeen on May 29, 2016 - 8 comments

I Was Ready to Go to Prison for My Anti-War Beliefs.

To protest the Vietnam War, I broke into a federal building. Half a century later, I finally got the chance to ask the judge why he made the shocking decision to let me walk.
posted by goatdog on May 24, 2016 - 23 comments

Radio discussion with Viet Thanh Nguyen, author of The Sympathizer

Nguyen's book was awarded the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Literature and is about a Vietnamese spy who flees wartime Saigon Drawing upon his own experience as a refugee of that war who later settled in the United States, Nguyen tells the program host Michael Krasny: "I knew that in writing a novel about a communist spy that the easiest way for me to write this book would be for the spy to renounce communism and embrace American individualism. This is how one gets published in the American literary industry, and I refused to do that." [more inside]
posted by wallawallasweet on May 7, 2016 - 7 comments

Recycle Nixon. Stop Kissing Pig Ass.

The University of British Columbia hosts an online collection of 250 anti-war and other posters from the Berkeley student movement, dating between 1968 and 1970. [more inside]
posted by Rumple on Apr 7, 2016 - 17 comments

Amazing sand artistry

Artists in Vietnam Can Create Photorealistic Designs Using Sand (narration in Russian). Commentary from a tv show in English. [more inside]
posted by nickyskye on Mar 16, 2016 - 10 comments

Another Vietnam

Unseen, rare images of the Vietnam War from the winning side
posted by infini on Feb 13, 2016 - 25 comments

The Keeper

Gay City News profiles Robert Woodworth, on his retirement after thirty-two years at New York’s LGBT Community Center.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jan 19, 2016 - 1 comment

Vietnam lifts ban on same-sex marriages

Vietnam becomes the first South-East Asian country to abolish a ban on same sex marriages.
posted by divabat on Jan 17, 2016 - 25 comments

Don't expect an invitation

Flying close to Beijing's new South China Sea islands [SLBBC]
posted by T.D. Strange on Dec 14, 2015 - 24 comments

Talkin' old school.

You might not have guessed that the spiritual ancestors of talk box talkers Pete Drake and Roger Troutman are musicians from faraway Thừa Thiên-Huế Province in Vietnam. Don't believe me? Just check it. [more inside]
posted by flapjax at midnite on Dec 5, 2015 - 12 comments

Ark and flood in one package

The US Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) was established in 1961 and has grown into one of the US government’s largest intelligence organizations. It employs 17,000 people, including thousands stationed overseas, and its 2013 fiscal year budget request was for $3.15 billion. Yet, the DIA is also one of the more secretive agencies in the U.S. intelligence community, regularly denying access to basic information about its structure, functions and activities. On November 20, the National Security Archive posted a new sourcebook of over 50 declassified documents that help to illuminate the DIA’s five-decades-long history. [more inside]
posted by zarq on Dec 4, 2015 - 20 comments

Refugees, Resettlement, and Reunion

"My mother, Kuo Nam Lo, was 24 when she spent her first few months in the U.S. at a refugee camp at a military base along a stretch of the Appalachian Mountains in central Pennsylvania. "I've always wanted to come back here," my mother told me in Cantonese on a recent drive through Fort Indiantown Gap. "Son, you've made my dream come true." It was the first time she had returned after she left to re-start her life in Philadelphia 40 years ago." [more inside]
posted by MonkeyToes on Nov 15, 2015 - 6 comments

Terror in Little Saigon

The journalists were assassinated on American soil, one after another. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Nov 4, 2015 - 5 comments

“I have the most fulfilling job in the world. I am the Art Squad”

In “Anything for a Witness”, the most recent episode of the Everything Is Stories podcast, Lois Gibson, relates the story of her career, loving faces, and her general thoughts on being the greatest forensic artist of our time. (Includes intense descriptions of sexual violence.) This closes a loop with “Burden of Proof”, the podcast’s first episode, in which a former videographer for COPS and former crime scene photographer describes their careers affiliated with the law. Inside, a few more of the crime episodes that have been a staple of the freeform, well-produced, interview podcast. [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Oct 31, 2015 - 1 comment

I Missed You in the Rain

A 1972 missed connection, as written up more than 40 years later on Craigslist. [internet archive link]
posted by ChrisR on Oct 3, 2015 - 104 comments

World's largest fire-breathing dragon-shaped bridge

In 2013, construction was finished on a bridge in Da Nang, Vietnam. It is six lanes wide, made of steel, has more than 2500 LED lights, is shaped like a dragon and can both breathe fire and spray water. The road is closed on weekend evenings for pyrotechnic shows. [more inside]
posted by jeather on Sep 15, 2015 - 26 comments

"Life is plentiful. Life is cheap in the Orient."

Hearts and Minds is a documentary about the Vietnam War. It was directed by Peter Davis. It came out in 1974 to considerable controversy. The war finally ended in 1975. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Aug 21, 2015 - 14 comments

100 Years of ...

[more inside]
posted by jillithd on Aug 6, 2015 - 11 comments

"If you hear a Chinook coming, get ready."

As the North Vietnamese Army captured Saigon, Ba Van Nguyen was one of the thousands of South Vietnamese desperately fleeing the country. Nguyen, a major in the South Vietnamese Air Force, would be executed and his family would be sent to concentration camps if he was caught. But Major Nguyen had a plan: he'd moved his family to his mother-in-law's house near a soccer field, and told his wife to listen for--and be ready when she heard--the distinctive whump-whump-whump-whump chopping sound made by the twin rotors of his CH-47 Chinook, the largest helicopter in the South Vietnamese Air Force. Early on the morning of April 29, 1975…
posted by mattdidthat on Jul 21, 2015 - 18 comments

"I knew that the traditional role was not going to be enough for me.”

Marlene Sanders’ Feminist Legacy [Slate obit] - "She wrote of her accomplishments: 'As I look back on my career, the women's movement provided an exceptional point when time, place and position all came together to give me the power and focus to contribute to the country’s awareness of the status of women.'" [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jul 16, 2015 - 4 comments

Hand of Dog

Sơn Đoòng 360: A series of 360° panoramas allows anyone with an internet connection to experience Vietnam's Son Doong cave, one of the planet's biggest. [more inside]
posted by almostmanda on Jun 4, 2015 - 6 comments

John Denver, America's unofficial musical diplomat

As John Denver's US prominence waned into the 1980s, opposite the rise of new wave and harder rock, he kept touring internationally for some notable firsts. In 1979, Denver was one of the performers to welcome Chinese Vice-Premier Deng Xiaoping to the US, and six years later, Denver was the first western artist to tour in the USSR, where he performed alongside Kermit the Frog. In 1992, he had another first for a western peformer, when Denver toured mainland China, to find that many of his audiences already knew his songs. Two years later, he was the first US act in Vietnam since the Vietnam War. [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Apr 18, 2015 - 44 comments

But in Vietnam there was not only one My Lai—there were many.

"The Scene of the Crime: A reporter’s journey to My Lai and the secrets of the past" by Seymour M. Hersh
posted by AElfwine Evenstar on Mar 25, 2015 - 10 comments

Why Don’t Americans Know What Really Happened in Vietnam?

For a little perspective on the 50th anniversary, consider this: we’re now as distant from the 1960s as the young Bob Dylan was from Teddy Roosevelt. For today’s typical college students, the Age of Aquarius is ancient history. Most of their parents weren’t even alive in 1965 when President Lyndon Johnson launched a massive escalation of the Vietnam War, initiating the daily bombing of the entire country, North and South, and an enormous buildup of more than half a million troops.
posted by josher71 on Mar 6, 2015 - 106 comments

"It’s hard to stay away from religion when you mess with acid."

Robert Stone, Novelist of the Vietnam Era and Beyond, Dies at 77 [New York Times]
"Robert Stone, who wrote ambitious, award-winning novels about errant Americans in dangerous circumstances or on existential quests — or both — as commentary on an unruly, wayward nation in the Vietnam era and beyond, died on Saturday at his home in Key West, Fla. He was 77.
[more inside] posted by Fizz on Jan 12, 2015 - 17 comments

A mind-blowing cave in Phong Nha-Kẻ Bàng National Park.

Hang Én, a huge cave in central Vietnam, is filled with thousands of swallows, and has a beach campsite in its main cavern. It's been scouted by Warner Brothers as a location for 'Peter Pan' and is the gateway to Sơn Đoòng cave, said to be the world's largest.
posted by xowie on Nov 2, 2014 - 9 comments

On Sewing as a Universal Language

Cousu Main (which starts here) is an adaptation of The Great British Sewing Bee, and the blog of one of the participants features significant spoilers for this season. Although it's in French, the show is not hard for an English speaker to follow, just as Project Runway Vietnam (2013: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8), Project Runway Korea (2009: 1 2 3 4 5 6 ...), and Projeto Fashion from Brazil--among others--make some sense to those familiar with the English-language series Project Runway Australia, Project Runway Canada, Project Runway Malaysia (2007 finale: 1-5 and 6), Project Runway Philippines (2008: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15), and Mission Catwalk from Jamaica.
posted by Monsieur Caution on Oct 18, 2014 - 11 comments

"One of us has to go back. Would you go back?"

As North Vietnamese forces marched towards Saigon in 1975, Citibank employee John Riordan (Warning: Autoplaying video) was ordered by Citibank to burn everything important and evacuate. In Hong Kong, he and his manager discussed the situation of their Vietnamese coworkers, who were in grave danger because they had worked for an American company. [more inside]
posted by Blue Jello Elf on Jul 29, 2014 - 11 comments

Armchair Travel to Vietnam and Cambodia

Rusty Compass is a travel website that focuses on Vietnam and Cambodia. It is the work of one man, Australian Mark Bowyer, who has lived in Vietnam since 1993. There are the usual reviews of hotels, restaurants and tourist sites, travel tips and advice, but what makes it really special are videos and blog posts about local people and events, fascinating stories told with charm. [more inside]
posted by maggiemaggie on Jul 4, 2014 - 2 comments

The Vietnam Center and Archive

The Texas Tech Vietnam Center and Archive "collects and preserves the documentary record of the Vietnam War, and supports and encourages research and education regarding all aspects of the American Vietnam Experience." It includes vast sections of digitized material, including audio, video, maps, as well as all manner of documents. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jul 2, 2014 - 7 comments

Did they call my birthday?

Waiting for your lottery number. James, Oklahoma, 1969, No. 365. I arrived at the dorm and went to my friend’s room where 12 of us were watching the lottery. I remember we had cases of beers to help us through. We knew this day could forever change our lives. When I came into the room I could feel the tension and see that the lottery had already started. It wasn't a big show on TV; it was just a series of numbers scrolling across the bottom of the screen while “I Love Lucy” played above. [more inside]
posted by goofyfoot on Apr 16, 2014 - 69 comments

"This will be final message from Saigon station"

"At that point when you say who were the people who stayed to the last, at that point I still had with me in Saigon, a couple of pretty determined and brawny types with whom I was able to get on the Embassy fence and we physically were lifting these people across. And we had a couple of military officers in the crowd with whom we had a deal that if they pick out of the crowd the people that we want, then in the end we will lift them in and they can go too. Well we did that. We made deals like that with the police all through the day. We were able to move people through the city of Saigon by making deals with police officers and saying, "Put your families in among these people and when we safely put them on the plane or safely put them on the bus then we are going to take you too. That worked very well." -- On Monday, The Washington Post published the obituary of Tom Polgar, the last CIA head of station in Vietnam and linked to his memories of the years he spend in Vietnam and the final evacuation of Saigon, written in 2013 for the Pushing on blog, which is largely dedicated to the War on Vietnam and the fall of Saigon.
posted by MartinWisse on Apr 3, 2014 - 22 comments

Channeling Their Inner Nomads

Begun at the edge of summer last year, Wanderrlust is the ongoing photography and travel blog of H.J. and Courtney Derr as they travel across the expanse of Southeast Asia. It began in Vietnam with the purchase of two cheap motorcycles and an eye to explore the country. So far they have experienced Ho Chi Minh City, drifted into the Mekong Delta, and to the City of a Thousand Pines. Don't miss the "warts and all" entry to discuss the things that haven't been so fun on their journey so far.
posted by Atreides on Jan 16, 2014 - 2 comments

Giving You Oral

Don't fight it. It's the year of the oral history. If there hasn't yet been an oral history on your favorite pop culture phenomenon, it won't be long. In the meantime, for your reading pleasure, how about starting with an oral history of Captain Marvel: The Series? Or perhaps you'd rather read about The Telluride Bluegrass Festival? If your taste runs more toward technology, check out an oral history of Apple design. More reading inside! [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 13, 2014 - 24 comments

Oliver Stone's Untold History of the United States

"Untold History of the United States challenges the basic narrative of the U.S. history that most Americans have been taught.... [Such history] is consoling; it is comforting. But it only tells a small part of the story." Instead of clips of modern people pondering the past, Oliver Stone's ten-part series relies heavily on archival footage and clips from old Hollywood films, with narration by Stone. Towards the end, he gets into the assassination of JFK, "but that should not detract from a series that sets out to be a counterweight to the patriotic cheerleading and myth-making." [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Dec 23, 2013 - 66 comments

The Big Picture

This is The Big Picture, an official television report of the United States Army, produced for the armed forces and the American people. Now to show you part of The Big Picture here is Master Sargent Stuart Queen
The series consists of ~822 documentaries produced by the United States Army Signal Corps Army Pictorial Service from 1951 to 1971 to educate both soldiers in uniform and the American public about military concerns as well as things like historical battles, world geography, famous soldiers, the latest weapons, space exploration, strategic objectives, peaceful initiatives, and the life of a soldier. Being a product of the Federal Government it belongs to the the American people, and is thus freely available to all to copy and distribute. Most can now be viewed on archive.org
[more inside] posted by Blasdelb on Dec 10, 2013 - 6 comments

Far From Vietnam':Six Directors Join to Shape a Collage

Far from Vietnam 1967 (Loin du Vietnam) Far from Vietnam (French: Loin du Vietnam) is a 1967 French documentary film directed by Joris Ivens. In seven different parts, Godard, Klein, Lelouch, Marker, Resnais and Varda show their sympathy for the North-Vietnamese army during the Vietnam-war. [more inside]
posted by KokuRyu on Nov 26, 2013 - 4 comments

Red Napoleon

'Legendary Vietnam Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap dies.' 'Vo Nguyen Giap, the brilliant and ruthless self-taught general who drove the French out of Vietnam to free it from colonial rule and later forced the Americans to abandon their grueling effort to save the country from communism, has died. At age 102, he was the last of Vietnam's old-guard revolutionaries.' 'To military scholars around the world, he was one of the 20th century’s leading practitioners of modern revolutionary guerrilla warfare.' [more inside]
posted by VikingSword on Oct 4, 2013 - 130 comments

"Well, now they know."

John Banvard, 95, Gerard Nadeau, 67, were married Thursday at a Chula Vista, CA Veterans' senior living facility. Mr. Banvard, a World War II vet, and Mr. Nadeau, a Vietnam vet, have been together for 20 years, and were married at the facility despite the opposition of some residents. In response to the opposition, Mr. Nadeau said, "Oh, that's their problem not mine, but you know what this will do, open the door for other people." [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 14, 2013 - 32 comments

Vietnam's Infinite Cave Tourism

World's Largest Cave, Son Doong, Prepping For First Public Tours (previously)
posted by kliuless on Sep 12, 2013 - 14 comments

"Come on Clock, talk to me boy!" . . . "It hurts"

Many years ago, I found a quarter inch audio reel in a rotting cardboard box, covered in dust, while helping my dear friend and mentor, Lighting Cameraman John B. Peters, clean up his garage. He told me it had been recorded in Vietnam during his coverage of that war. On the box, still legible, was handwritten: “Firefight, no name village, near Chu Lai, September 10, 1966, Nagra 3, 3,75 I.P.S.” John recalled that he was out with a patrol that day, and when the Vietcong ambushed them, they all had to duck for cover, but his soundman kept the audio recorder rolling throughout the duration of the fierce firefight that followed.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Sep 6, 2013 - 43 comments

Back from Da Nang

Former CBS Reporter Bruce Dunning, who reported the story of the last flight from Da Nang, has died at the age of 73. [more inside]
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Aug 27, 2013 - 6 comments

The circuitous histories of hamburgers and ketchup

The history of the hamburger could be a relatively short story, or one spanning centuries and continents, depending on how far you disassemble the modern hamburger. If you look for the origins of ground meat between two pieces of bread, that's something American, but where and when exactly is the question. But how did we get the ground meat patty? You can thank the Mongols and Kublai Khan, who brought their ground meat to Russia. Oh, and don't forget the fish sauce! [more inside]
posted by filthy light thief on Aug 19, 2013 - 35 comments

John Hodgman On Full Metal Jacket

"But The Shining speaks to what makes Kubrick such an interesting and, for a lot of people, troublesome filmmaker, because he does not give you what you want. At all. He does not give you a Vietnam movie set in the jungle, and he does not give you a horror movie that is just like Stephen King’s The Shining. He doesn’t even give you scares for a long time, [just] ominous foreboding. And it takes people a while to figure out, “Oh, maybe I don’t know what I want. Maybe this is better.” - Mefi's Own Jon Hodgman talks about Full Metal Jacket with Scott Tobias for "The Last Great Movie I Saw."
posted by The Whelk on Jul 12, 2013 - 75 comments

Facing up to CNN

Should viewer discretion be advised for pictures of children with congenital deformities? One Ontario woman doesn't think so: "I am 'deformed' and reading that viewer discretion warning ahead of the article (amounted) to telling me that every time I left the house I should wear a similar warning." [more inside]
posted by greatgefilte on Apr 23, 2013 - 32 comments

Fascinating pics of Vietnam in the 1980s

Fascinating pics of Vietnam in the 1980s (Part 1) (Part 2). Photographs by Philip Jones Griffiths. Here's a 1993 interview.
posted by KokuRyu on Apr 22, 2013 - 13 comments

A sobering look back on an infamous chapter in history

In the Year of the Pig is a documentary on the Vietnam war, produced and originally released in 1968 as the war raged. It begins with some background on the end of the French colonial period, then moves on to the American involvement. It features gripping historical footage from the war itself and from leading political players of the time. At the time of its release, a New York Times review said "There are no frills and few ifs, ands or buts about the stinging, graphic and often frighteningly penetrating movie". It is highly recommended for anyone seeking to understand more of the history of the war. Viewable in its entirety here.
posted by flapjax at midnite on Apr 21, 2013 - 27 comments

CS in VN

Kids In Vietnam Are Crazy Good At Programming - '11th graders in Vietnam are so good at programming that they could easily pass an interview at Google' (via)
posted by kliuless on Mar 27, 2013 - 63 comments

Page: 1 2 3 4 5