261 posts tagged with WashingtonPost.
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Postcards from the Great Divide

Postcards from the Great Divide: political stories from a divided America, is a nine part short film series from across the country telling stories of our politics and our culture. (Washington Post article on the series.)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Jul 11, 2016 - 1 comment

If you can't Instagram it, are you really there?

Performers have had it with your shit: your phone is getting locked up.
posted by naju on Jun 18, 2016 - 141 comments

Of Smoothies and (Internet News) Cycles

LIGHTS UP
Buzzfeed: “Gwyneth Paltrow drinks $200 smoothies for breakfast!”
Vanity Fair: “Actually, they’re just $10.52 smoothies.”
Washington Post: “Whatever! It’s a good excuse for us to make a video and talk about the theoretical health benefits.”
fin.
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 24, 2016 - 49 comments

Obituary.

"Depression stole decades of our lives together. Depression lies. I have to tell the truth." Eleni Pinnow writes in the Washington Post about the obituary she wrote for her sister, Aletha.
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Mar 23, 2016 - 18 comments

“My God, that fiddle sounds incredible.”

The Violin Thief by Geoff Edgers Philip Johnson was a promising musical prodigy. Then he stole a teacher’s prized Stradivarius. [more inside]
posted by Fizz on Mar 17, 2016 - 19 comments

I am like you. You are like me.

"For 3 year old Clark Reynolds, Thursday began like most others." Janell Ross on Pete Souza's photograph of Obama and his "little visitor." [more inside]
posted by sallybrown on Feb 20, 2016 - 34 comments

How abortion opponents bought a Va. abortion clinic to deceive women

How abortion opponents secretly bought a Va. abortion clinic to deceive women. (WaPost) Just five minutes after signing the final papers at closing, the doctor called her office to check her messages. “Triple A Women for Choice,” a voice answered. The doctor thought she made a mistake and redialed. “Triple A Women for Choice,” the voice said again. Whoever bought her practice had the phones forwarded to the pregnancy center within minutes of the sale, before the lawyers even had a chance to close their briefcases.
posted by OmieWise on Feb 4, 2016 - 51 comments

Roomies Like These

Margaret Sugg, Nancy Fassett, and Barbara Fletcher moved into a group house together in the 1960s and have lived together ever since, renting a row house in Georgetown, DC; buying a home in the Maryland suburbs, and then retiring together to a nearby retirement community. [more inside]
posted by sallybrown on Jan 29, 2016 - 17 comments

Meet Ted Cruz’s Secretive $11 Million Donor

Critics warned that Citizens United would bring about a new era of corporate influence in politics, with companies and businesspeople buying elections to promote their financial interests. So far, that hasn’t happened much… Instead, a small group of billionaires has flooded races with ideologically tinged contributions. Zachary Mider profiles the enigmatic Bob Mercer, the single biggest donor of the current campaign, for Bloomberg: “What Kind of Man Spends Millions to Elect Ted Cruz?” [more inside]
posted by Going To Maine on Jan 24, 2016 - 62 comments

One weird trick to save money when shopping

At the Washington Post’s Wonkblog, Danielle Paquette explains “why you should always buy the men’s version of almost anything”
posted by Going To Maine on Dec 22, 2015 - 215 comments

WaPo Drops the Mic on "He or She"

The Washington Post has updated its style guide: "e-mail" is now "email", "Web sites" are now "websites", and perhaps most significantly, "they/them/their" will now be used as gender-neutral third-person singular personal pronouns, instead of defaulting to "he/him/his" or recasting to make a sentence plural (e.g. "Readers will have their own opinions" will now be the more precise "Each reader will have their own opinion."). Post copy editor (and proprietor of The Slot) Bill Walsh notes "I suspect that the singular they will go largely unnoticed even by those who oppose it on principle. We’ve used it before, if inadvertently, and I’ve never heard a complaint."
posted by Etrigan on Dec 14, 2015 - 102 comments

Three farting uncles, Two puking dogs, Anaphylaxis in a pear tree.

Carolyn Hax's Hootenanny of Holiday Horrors 2015 was today. Advice Columnist Carolyn Hax hosts a (nearly) weekly chat in which people share their problems and she offers (nearly) instant advice. But sometimes you don't really need advice. Sometimes you just need to tell someone about the things your relatives did to you (or gave to you) at Christmas. [more inside]
posted by jacquilynne on Dec 11, 2015 - 38 comments

Archive.org, WHOIS Lookups, & Facebook >> WaPo, USA Today, & GQ

We’ve all followed the sad news about Lamar Odom… [It’s] prompted lots of journalists to ask a natural question: Who made Reload?… I’ve yet to see one proffer anything more than a skin-deep answer… Here are the simple steps I took to begin answering the question… My goal is to help you become a better consumer of the press, so that when you read paper-thin accounts like the above, you stop and say: “Hey! That’s not real journalism.” Only with that kind of pressure will the media improve.
With a few quick searches, Blake Ross took the press to task and solved a mystery.
posted by Going To Maine on Oct 19, 2015 - 41 comments

Slow Steps To Freedom

A nonviolent drug offender who was granted clemency after 22 years adjusts to life on the outside. "I believe in your ability to prove the doubters wrong." - President Obama [more inside]
posted by infinite intimation on Oct 8, 2015 - 14 comments

An American Void

“I didn’t take him seriously,” is what Joey says again and again to the people who keep asking the same questions again and again, including investigators who arrived at the trailer after one of the most notorious mass killings in recent American history. Why did he do nothing? they asked. What kind of people would do nothing? (Longform WaPo)
posted by roomthreeseventeen on Sep 15, 2015 - 104 comments

Why Americans dress so casually

The modern market allows us to personalize that style. Casual is the sweet spot between looking like every middle class American and being an individual in the massive wash of options. This idea of the freedom to dress in a way that is meaningful to us as people, and to express various types of identity.
posted by ellieBOA on Sep 14, 2015 - 314 comments

How companies make millions off lead-poisoned, poor blacks

What happens in these deals is a matter of perspective. To industry advocates, the transactions get money to people who need it now. They keep desperate families off the streets, pay medical bills, put kids through school [...] But to critics, Access Funding is part of an industry that profits off the poor and disabled. And Baltimore has become a prime target. [more inside]
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Aug 31, 2015 - 21 comments

Merl Reagle, RIP

Merl Reagle, the imaginative and irrepressibly amusing verbal virtuoso who created the crossword puzzles published each week in The Washington Post Magazine and in many newspapers, died Aug. 22 in a hospital in Tampa. He was 65. (Washington Post obituary) [more inside]
posted by chavenet on Aug 24, 2015 - 24 comments

Like many things, this will require some patience to get through.

Why Time Flies: A visualization by Maximilian Kiener of philosopher Paul Janet's theory of why time seems to pass more quickly as one gets older. As Wonkblog explains it, The apparent length of a period of time is proportional to our life span itself.
posted by Cash4Lead on Aug 3, 2015 - 26 comments

Go home Connecticut, you're drunk.

“I have a love of ships. What can I say? They transport food around the planet.” That is a quote from “Grey,” the “Fifty Shades of Grey” book told from Christian’s perspective, but it could equally describe how New Hampshire came up with its state flag.
Every state flag is wrong, and here's why.
posted by jenkinsEar on Jun 24, 2015 - 114 comments

Displaced in the D.R.

The New York Times reports that the Dominican Republic will begin deporting thousands of undocumented migrant workers, most of them Haitian, later this week. The Washington Post provides historical context. In The Nation, Greg Grandin reports on the imminent event. Last week, he characterized the effort as "a vicious, anti-black pogrom.” In Harper’s, Rachel Nolan has a detailed letter from the Dominican Republic explaining the situation at length.
posted by Rustic Etruscan on Jun 16, 2015 - 15 comments

Roads? Where We're Going, We Don't Need Roads.

The Obama administration is investigating allegations that two senior Secret Service agents, including a top member of the president’s protective detail, drove a government car into White House security barricades after drinking at a late-night party last week, an agency official said Wednesday.
House Oversight Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz told CNN that his initial understanding is that the two agents were "partying in Georgetown" when they responded to an incident at the White House. Mr. Chaffetz added: “It’s never good to be drunk at work, especially if you are in the Secret Service.”
posted by Going To Maine on Mar 11, 2015 - 47 comments

Star Trek V: Kirk manoeuvres his way into the director's chair

In response to a perhaps unsurprising takedown of Spock in the wake of Leonard Nimoy's death from the Washington Free Beacon, Daniel Drezner at the Washington Post takes a hard look at the career of Captain Kirk (with a particular focus on the films), the neo-conservative's more obvious spirit animial. Kirk doesn't come out looking very good. [more inside]
posted by dry white toast on Mar 9, 2015 - 189 comments

Keep Korma and Curry On

Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious. [Washington Post]
In a large new analysis of more than 2,000 popular recipes, data scientists have discovered perhaps the key reason why Indian food tastes so unique: It does something radical with flavors, something very different from what we tend to do in the United States and the rest of Western culture. And it does it at the molecular level.
posted by Fizz on Mar 3, 2015 - 113 comments

Can time heal these wounds?

In 2001, Josh Kaplowitz was a recent Yale graduate and Teach for America worker in a Washington D.C. public school. After pushing 7 year old Raynard Ware--something still he still disputes--Kaplowitz was arrested and then the subject of a $20M lawsuit. Eleven years later, Kaplowitz, by this point a lawyer, received a friend request on facebook from Ware: the Washington Post Magazine has the story of their reconnection. [more inside]
posted by MoonOrb on Jan 31, 2015 - 90 comments

How's your subway IQ?

Can you name these cities just by looking at their subway maps? (SLWaPo)
posted by beagle on Jan 19, 2015 - 99 comments

All hail the complicated woman: the 2015 Golden Globes

"As Maggie Gyllenhaal put it in accepting an award for her performance in 'The Honorable Woman': 'What I see, actually, are women who are sometimes powerful and sometimes not, sometimes sexy, sometimes not, sometimes honorable, sometimes not. And what I think is new is the wealth of roles for actual women in television and in film.'" The 'strong female character' is dead. All hail the complicated woman., by Alyssa Rosenberg for The Washington Post. [more inside]
posted by joseph conrad is fully awesome on Jan 14, 2015 - 13 comments

when your food label is bumpy, you must toss it

A WaPo profile of industrial design student Solveiga Pakštaitė and her latest invention, a bio-reactive food expiry label called Bump Mark: Landfills are overflowing with food. Here's a gelatin label that could limit the waste.
Misleading labels are one reason that consumers waste nearly 40 percent of the food they buy — and one of the inspirations behind Bump Mark, a new bio-based food label made with gelatin. As the food in a package starts to decay, so does the gelatin; when it finally expires, the gelatin reveals a layer of bumps. If the label is still smooth, a consumer finally knows unequivocally that food is still safe to eat... By changing the concentration of gelatin, the designer can match the label to specific foods. A weak concentration breaks down faster, and works for foods such as milk and meats that don't last as long. For any given food, the label can be adjusted to degrade at exactly the same rate.
[more inside] posted by divined by radio on Oct 28, 2014 - 42 comments

You'll hear of a wife murdered before you hear another one come forward.

Whenever Dewan Smith-Williams sees Janay Rice on television, she feels like she's looking into a mirror. Smith-Williams, 44, remembers the denial, the secrecy, the sense of isolation, the shame. But most of all, she remembers the fear of ruining her husband's career as a National Football League player — the feeling that coming forth, or seeking justice, would destroy her four children's financial security. She understands that struggle not only because she, too, was a domestic-violence victim, but because she watched so many other NFL wives, many of them her friends, go through the same nightmare. For each of them, it began with their husbands' attacks and worsened with a culture that, they felt, compelled silence.
Simone Sebastian and Ines Bebea investigate for WaPo: For battered NFL wives, a message from the cops and the league: Keep quiet.

[TW: domestic violence] [more inside]
posted by divined by radio on Oct 20, 2014 - 42 comments

Bad News Beards

Who's the hairiest team in baseball? The Washington Post weighted the style of facial hair, or lack thereof, of all active ballplayers on a scale of 0 to 8 — zero being clean shaven, eight being the grizzliest — then calculated the average hairiness of each team.
posted by troika on Oct 3, 2014 - 24 comments

Statistics say driving while black is real

The Justice Department statistics, based on the Police-Public Contact Survey, show that "relatively more black drivers (12.8%) than white (9.8%) and Hispanic (10.4%) drivers were pulled over in a traffic stop during their most recent contact with police." Or, to frame it another way: A black driver is about 31 percent more likely to be pulled over than a white driver, or about 23 percent more likely than a Hispanic driver. "Driving while black" is, indeed, a measurable phenomenon.
The Washington Post's Christopher Ingraham looks at the recently released statistics about traffic stops and whether people are pulled over for driving while black.
posted by MartinWisse on Sep 9, 2014 - 27 comments

Stop and Seize: An Investigation into Asset Forfeiture

Stop and Seize: Aggressive police take hundreds of millions of dollars from motorists not charged with crimes. A multimedia investigation by the Washington Post.
posted by milquetoast on Sep 7, 2014 - 67 comments

have taxes your way

"International fast food behemoth Burger King Worldwide Inc. confirmed Tuesday that it will pay about $11 billion to buy Canadian chain Tim Hortons Inc., which sells coffee, donuts, and other breakfast food fare. The deal would merge America's second-largest burger chain, which is valued at nearly $10 billion, with the Canadian equivalent to Dunkin' Donuts, which is valued at more than $8 billion. It would also move the new company's headquarters to Canada, where corporate taxes are significantly lower." [more inside]
posted by flex on Aug 26, 2014 - 225 comments

"Another search warrant 'for pictures of his erect penis'"

A 17 year-old Virginia teenager who is under investigation for sending a consensual sext to his 15-year-old girlfriend may be forced to have an erection in front of police as evidence in the case. [more inside]
posted by porn in the woods on Jul 9, 2014 - 85 comments

A ‘Band-Aid’ for 800 children

Nora Sandigo is guardian to hundreds of U.S. citizens born to illegal immigrants who are subject to deportation. [more inside]
posted by zeptoweasel on Jul 7, 2014 - 34 comments

There are Plenty of Skeptics

The US Secret Service, the federal law enforcement agency tasked with protecting the safety of current and former national leaders and their families, visiting heads of state, and others, posted a work order on Monday seeking the development of social media analytics software capable of detecting sarcasm online.
posted by chavenet on Jun 7, 2014 - 74 comments

How well can you spell?

How well can you spell? is a spelling challenge from the Washington Post. Just click on the misspelled words. [more inside]
posted by zardoz on May 30, 2014 - 112 comments

I could do that.

The Washington Ballet's hardest dance moves - PostTV goes behind the scenes at the Washington Ballet to get six professional dancers to show off the most difficult moves in their repertoire. [via]
posted by Think_Long on May 22, 2014 - 12 comments

When power evaporates and you’re just a 61-year-old without a job

"You resigned, though your office is the office that actually started this investigation. This would not have come to light unless your office would’ve started it. But as the leader at the top, you resigned. And people that were directly there making the decisions, signing onto the warrants, going through these fraudulent contracts, they’re still there."
Two years after Martha Johnson resigned from her position as the head of the General Services Administration following an investigation of wasteful spending under her leadership, what is her life like now? Lillian Cunningham writes for the Washington Post's On Leadership blog about life after a scandal.
posted by medusa on Apr 30, 2014 - 46 comments

The Pity-Charity Complex

"I say “you” deliberately here, because much of the writing about low-wage workers tends to obscure just that fact — that these stories could well be about you. Too much writing on the left and the right has tended to treat the people in some of the nation’s most common jobs as if they are some exotic Other rather than our neighbors, our family members and ourselves. " --Sarah Jaffe on the media's strange ways of talking about low-wage workers.
posted by The Whelk on Mar 20, 2014 - 40 comments

Yes, Kazakhstan should change its name. This map shows why.

"Life-long Kazakhstan President Nursultan Nazarbayev has suggested changing his country's name to make it friendlier to investors and tourists. It's obviously a little silly to change your country's name for marketing purposes. But there may be more meaningful reasons for the country to change its name..." An interesting perspective from Max Fisher at the Washington Post.
posted by paleyellowwithorange on Feb 11, 2014 - 33 comments

"I became a hell child."

Growing up in a Romanian orphanage, Izidor Ruckel just wanted to get out. Now, he makes it his mission to raise awareness of the suffering of other orphans who remain institutionalized. [more inside]
posted by chainsofreedom on Jan 31, 2014 - 10 comments

And they know he’ll play it totally straight

One of the hottest issues in journalism today is “native” advertising, the tricks that publishers deploy to elide the domains of journalism and advertising. It’s about time that Politico’s Mike Allen got his due as a native-advertising pioneer. A review of “Playbook” archives shows that the special interests that pay for slots in the newsletter get adoring coverage elsewhere in the playing field of “Playbook.” [more inside]
posted by T.D. Strange on Jan 15, 2014 - 17 comments

Cell Phones: Tracking Devices That Make Phone Calls

The NSA is gathering nearly 5 billion cell phone location records a day, allowing the agency to track the movement of individuals and map their relationships in ways that would have been previously unimaginable. The bulk collection feeds CO-TRAVELER, an analytic tool that lets analysts identify relationships by tracking people whose movements intersect, and look back in time to see where people have been. TL:DR? The WaPo has a quick video explaining CO-TRAVELER here. [more inside]
posted by anemone of the state on Dec 4, 2013 - 134 comments

Savor your newspaper. This is what it feels like when it’s gone.

Gabriel Stein reflects on the end of the The Rocky Mountain News, his father's decades-long career there as an editorial cartoonist, and the silver lining he sees in the billionaire acquisitions of The Washington Post and The Boston Globe.
posted by audi alteram partem on Sep 11, 2013 - 8 comments

I'll take "What is Syria" for $100, Alex

9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask
posted by desjardins on Sep 1, 2013 - 425 comments

I Now Pronounce You Man and Man

Today, Ruth Bader Ginsburg becomes the first Supreme Court Justice to officiate at a same sex marriage.
posted by Going To Maine on Aug 31, 2013 - 29 comments

USG Black Budget Revealed.

Using documents obtained from whistleblower Edward Snowden, the Washington Post reports on the United States' $52.6 billion "black budget" for 2013.
posted by anemone of the state on Aug 29, 2013 - 77 comments

Speaking in foreign tongues

The Atlantic's Ta-Nehisi Coates has spent the last few months in Paris specifically studying French. His latest dispatch, "Or Perhaps You Are Too Stupid to Learn French," looks at how hard it is to apply the rules of new language in real time, while fighting with one's perceptions and limitations (Other dispatches are here).

Washington Post writer Jay Matthews asks if learning a foreign language is worth it and recounts his own struggles studying Chinese. Another WaPo writer, Elizabeth Chang, recalls her experience in learning Arabic.
posted by Brandon Blatcher on Aug 22, 2013 - 200 comments

sold.. to Jeff Bezos

The Washington Post will be sold to Jeff Bezos for $250 million, ending four decades of the Graham family. Amazon will have no role in the purchase.
posted by stbalbach on Aug 5, 2013 - 130 comments

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